suitsetama

kloie
Posts: 47
Joined: 2006-07-26, 1:02
Real Name: russell
Gender: female
Location: Houston Texas
Country: US United States (United States)

suitsetama

Postby kloie » 2017-09-10, 15:53

Suitsetama or suitsetada on vaga kahjulik.
Smoking is very harmful.
Which verb should I use?

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 602
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: suitsetama

Postby ainurakne » 2017-09-10, 16:38

Suitsetada on väga kahjulik.

... because the meaning is actually "To smoke is very harmful." ~ "It is very harmful to smoke."

---

"Smoking is very harmful." would be:
Suitsetamine on väga kahjulik.

suitsetamine (noun) - action name, derived from the verb suitsetama.
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away

kloie
Posts: 47
Joined: 2006-07-26, 1:02
Real Name: russell
Gender: female
Location: Houston Texas
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: suitsetama

Postby kloie » 2017-09-10, 17:22

I hope,that I could ask another question,without opening a new post.
Lapsed hakkavad lauda (katma, Katta.
The kids begin to ...?

Linguaphile
Posts: 431
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: suitsetama

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-09-10, 17:59

kloie wrote:I hope,that I could ask another question,without opening a new post.
Lapsed hakkavad lauda (katma, Katta.
The kids begin to ...?

Lapsed hakkavad lauda katma. The children begin to set the table. or The children are going to set the table.

Explanations:
1. The verb hakkama is another one (like pidama) which always requires the use of the ma-infinitive rather than the da-infinitive.
2. Hakkama does mean "begin," as you said, but it's also often used to indicate something that will happen in the near future, the way we use "going to" in English. So, it is correct to translate it either as "begin to" or as "going to," depending on the context.

So, for example, the phrase Hakkame minema more often means "let's get going!" rather than "we're beginning to go." For some reason, memorizing this phrase hakkame minema has helped me to always remember that the verb hakkama requires the ma-infinitive. Maybe that will help you as well?
Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere. El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes. Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal. Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt. L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout. Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw. Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 602
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: suitsetama

Postby ainurakne » 2017-09-10, 19:07

Differently from pidama (which I think requires the secondary verb to use the "instructive" ma-form, even though the difference is not visible in modern Estonian), hakkama is a pure example of requiring "going into the state of doing something" ma-form (or relative future).

You use ma-infinitive when you:
- start doing something: hakkan minema, hakkan jooksma, hakkan lugema;
- go somewhere where you do something, get into the position for doing something: lähen jooksma, lähen sööma, lähen magama;
- cause something to happen, make someone do something: panen käima, ajan minema, sunnin jooksma, panen lugema;

But ma-infinitive could also stand alone:
Sööma! - Come to eat! Go to eat! Start eating! (literally: Into the state of eating!)
Magama! - Go to sleep! (literally: Into the state of sleeping!)

kloie wrote:I hope,that I could ask another question,without opening a new post.
I think you can also change the title of this thread if you edit your first post, in case you would like to do so.

Linguaphile wrote:So, for example, the phrase Hakkame minema more often means "let's get going!" rather than "we're beginning to go."
I think this is because in colloquial language, the regular we-form of the indicative mood is often used in place of the we-form of the imperative mood. Imperative mood for 1st person plural ("Hakakem minema!") is overly poetic.
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away


Return to “Estonian (Eesti keel)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest