Friends Theme Tune

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luap
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Friends Theme Tune

Postby luap » 2006-03-06, 21:23

I am not sure how correct I am here, but is it true that Estonian does not have a future tense and therefore this song wouldn't translate (I'll be there for you..) - Would it therefore be I am there for you.

Please let me know if I have confused your language with another one. :)

If this is possible to translate accurately would someone be kind enough to do this, mainly as my mate has promised me £10 if it can be done

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Loiks
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Re: Friends Theme Tune

Postby Loiks » 2006-03-07, 18:33

luap wrote:I am not sure how correct I am here, but is it true that Estonian does not have a future tense and therefore this song wouldn't translate (I'll be there for you..) - Would it therefore be I am there for you.

Please let me know if I have confused your language with another one. :)

If this is possible to translate accurately would someone be kind enough to do this, mainly as my mate has promised me £10 if it can be done


No specific future tense in Estonian (neither in other Finnic languages). Present tense is used instead. And we don't miss the future tense because it's understandable by context anyway that we talk about future :).

About this 'I'll be there for you...'. I would translate it as 'Ma olen sinu jaoks olemas' (literally: I am your (genitive) for in being). And I'd add some word like alati or ikka ('always' or smth like that) to make it clearer that we talk about the future. So my final translation: Ma olen alati sinu jaoks olemas.

So I'm afraid you won't get your £10 :).

aabram

Postby aabram » 2006-03-14, 17:09

Just nitpicking and adding to the confusion here. Yes, it can be accurately translated as far as the meaning goes, so I'd argue you still get that £10. No native speaker would misunderstand when it's written as Loiks wrote here.

On a related note I'd like to point out that there are numerous other ways one can indicate the future and that is with helper verbs like "saama" (to become), "olema" (to be), "hakkama" (begin to), "minema" (to go). If one want's to specifically indicate something that will happen and has not happened yet it will become blatantly obvious as soon as you use the right wording. For example when you translate "This will be wonderful" as "see saab olema imetore" then no native speaker will mistake it for the present tense. None.

Also there are combinations that are used mostly for future tense and rarely for present, although the words strictly by themselves can be used to indicate either. For example: you could translate literally "Ma lähen koju" as "I am (now) going home" but it is usually safe to assume that it should be "I will go home". Only when you call someone at 5:30pm on his cellphone and ask "what are you doing there?" and you hear him in the midst of traffic, then you can assume that he is actually in the process of going home but otherwise it'd usually mean the future tense.

So go claim your... let's say £5 since we do have ways to ensure the expression of future tense and one can translate that song's meaning.

ltd
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Postby ltd » 2006-03-16, 16:50

Here´s a shot
:twisted:

Nii, et keegi ei öelnud sulle, et elu saab nii olema
Su töö on nali, sa oled vaene, su armuelu saabub surnuna
On nagu oleksid alati kinni teisel käigul
Kui ei ole olnud sinu päev, su nädal, su kuu,
või isegi su aasta.
Aga...

Ma olen alati su jaoks olemas
(kui vihma hakkab sadama)
Ma olen alati su jaoks olemas
(Nagu ma pole veel kunagi olnud)
Ma olen alati su jaoks olemas
(sest oled ka minu jaoks olemas)


So no one told you life was gonna be this way
Your job's a joke, you're broke, your love life's D.O.A
It's like you're always stuck in second gear
When it hasn't been your day, your week, your month, or even your year
But...

I'll be there for you

(When the rain starts to pour)

I'll be there for you

(Like I've been there before)

I'll be there for you

('cause you're there for me too)


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eurooplane
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Postby eurooplane » 2006-03-17, 20:04

aabram wrote:On a related note I'd like to point out that there are numerous other ways one can indicate the future and that is with helper verbs like "saama" (to become), "olema" (to be), "hakkama" (begin to), "minema" (to go).
:idea: It makes me to think, that we often use ‘minema’ in french to indicate a closed-futur (~ ‘We go to eat, soon.’) whereas we use the futur tense for a far-futur ( ‘We will eat after the show’ or ‘This boy will be musician’).
Is this ‘minema’ a closed-futur too ? it's the case in aabram’s example ‘Ma lähen koju’...

Ada H.
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Postby Ada H. » 2006-03-19, 20:08

I think "minema" always means actually going somewhere, whether now or in the future. "Ma lähen tööle" can mean that one is actually walking. It may also mean a plan for the future (near or distant), but it would normally mean going or moving somewhere. Otherwise it would be "ma hakkan tööle".

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Loiks
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Postby Loiks » 2006-03-19, 21:23

This 'saab olema' is wrong officially, I wrote 'tulee olemaan' in Finnish forum and the natives said it was wrong, same here! A German(ic) loan!

Ada H.
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Postby Ada H. » 2006-03-20, 17:58

'Saab olema' is not considered that wrong anymore: http://www.eki.ee/books/ekkr/sy27.html

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Loiks
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Postby Loiks » 2006-03-20, 18:05

Ada H. wrote:'Saab olema' is not considered that wrong anymore: http://www.eki.ee/books/ekkr/sy27.html


OK, maybe I have old fashioned views on that :)


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