Translation mystery

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nat28
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Translation mystery

Postby nat28 » 2015-05-11, 16:01

Hi there,

My grandmother is originally from northern Greece (macedonia) and I'm trying to translate a phrase she's always said but am having no luck. She always said "ti mil vam" to tell her grandchildren "I love you". However I can't find seem to find anywhere that says ti mil vam translates to I love you. I was wondering if anyone could help me out. Perhaps I have "ti mil vam" written incorrectly or it doesn't directly translate to I love you.

Any insight would be helpful! Thanks in advance!!

N.

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Multiturquoise
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Re: Translation mystery

Postby Multiturquoise » 2015-05-20, 10:14

"Ti mil vam" doesn't seem Greek at all. It looks like some Slavic language. In Demotic Greek, I love you is "Σ' αγαπώ". I'll leave the rest to the natives.
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Re: Translation mystery

Postby dimos » 2015-05-22, 13:42

This is not greek or aromanian (my native languages). It could be some slavic or turkish dialect spoken in Macedonia in the past. If you know the town where she was from...
How come you don't know what language your grandmother spoke? :?

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Re: Translation mystery

Postby Multiturquoise » 2015-05-23, 11:34

dimos wrote:This is not greek or aromanian (my native languages). It could be some slavic or turkish dialect spoken in Macedonia in the past. If you know the town where she was from...
How come you don't know what language your grandmother spoke? :?


No, it's not Turkish. In standard Turkish it's "Seni seviyorum", and in some dialects "Seni seviyom", "Seni seveyrum", "Seni sevirem". It's most likely Slavic.
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Re: Translation mystery

Postby Salajane » 2016-02-29, 10:08

nat28 wrote:Hi there,

My grandmother is originally from northern Greece (macedonia) and I'm trying to translate a phrase she's always said but am having no luck. She always said "ti mil vam" to tell her grandchildren "I love you". However I can't find seem to find anywhere that says ti mil vam translates to I love you. I was wondering if anyone could help me out. Perhaps I have "ti mil vam" written incorrectly or it doesn't directly translate to I love you.

Any insight would be helpful! Thanks in advance!!

N.

It seems that it's a Slavic language.
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dimos
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Re: Translation mystery

Postby dimos » 2016-03-24, 22:07

nat28 wrote:Hi there,

My grandmother is originally from northern Greece (macedonia) and I'm trying to translate a phrase she's always said but am having no luck. She always said "ti mil vam" to tell her grandchildren "I love you". However I can't find seem to find anywhere that says ti mil vam translates to I love you. I was wondering if anyone could help me out. Perhaps I have "ti mil vam" written incorrectly or it doesn't directly translate to I love you.

Any insight would be helpful! Thanks in advance!!

N.


It's Pomak :)

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Re: Translation mystery

Postby Golden Breathing » 2017-12-12, 1:00

dimos wrote:
nat28 wrote:Hi there,

My grandmother is originally from northern Greece (macedonia) and I'm trying to translate a phrase she's always said but am having no luck. She always said "ti mil vam" to tell her grandchildren "I love you". However I can't find seem to find anywhere that says ti mil vam translates to I love you. I was wondering if anyone could help me out. Perhaps I have "ti mil vam" written incorrectly or it doesn't directly translate to I love you.

Any insight would be helpful! Thanks in advance!!

N.


It's Pomak :)


Correction: It's maybe the Pomak dialect of Bulgarian. It belongs to the Rup dialectal cluster. Here is a list of all Bulgarian dialects which at least Wikipedia knows:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_dialects

Dismissing your initial perception, it may also be the Kostur dialect (a dialect of Bulgarian alive in Kastoria, hence "Kostur" (that's 2 seconds of reading which my brain capacity accumulated rapidly) ), the Doyran dialect (Most likely the name hails from "Dorian" as in "Dorian Greeks" or "Dorians"), the Kukush-Voden dialect or Lerin dialect (Recall in your mind the name of "Lenin" for effortless memorization). All of those referred dialects are mainly located in Greece. Mind you, Pomak isn't in the same dialect cluster from what I acquired but from Rup, and those are compiled in "Dialects from Aegean Macedonia" cluster which I strongly ponder that isn't actually in fact registered as a dialect cluster at all but a messy mesh of categorization.

I am not sure. Meh, it's Bulgarian btw... Even if Pomak dialect dies out, they are plenty of harsh enforced speeches and over-pressured utterances of "nyash nyash" and "zaldrizeszzzzzzzzzz" Slavic sounds out there from Russian, Ukrainians and other buzzing bees to ruin our ears. Plus, Bulgarian itself as a main language which has a whole functioning state to back its prosperity. Aromanian however, ah,... it's one of a unique kind. All Romance languages clearly in fact are undeniably dinstinct in sound inventory from each other. You won't call Italian and French as phonemically approaching each other. They aren't frankly speaking. They inherently sound completely unrelated despite having a lexical inventory that is pretty much the "same".

Bulgarian will live on even if Pomak dies, would Aromanian live on if it dies in Greece? No. We won't have another sample. Another living representative. And Romanian, no, we both know and everybody knows... isn't the representative and it's actually in fact never was and going to be.


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