Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

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jwolfe
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Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

Postby jwolfe » 2013-08-19, 11:47

I am writing a story where a character needs to say "Thank you" using the oldest Ancient Greek form still known about. Since the book is in English, I'll need to phonetically spell it out, so I also need to know how it would sound. "Close enough to something authentic" would still be better than the online English-Greek translators that I've found.

"Thank you" (in Ancient Greek :) ),

Jennifer

modus.irrealis
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Re: Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

Postby modus.irrealis » 2013-08-19, 20:39

In Ancient Greek, they used the word χάρις (lit. "grace") with various verbs, so one of the more common options you can use is χάριν σοι ἔχω charin soi echo.

jwolfe
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Re: Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

Postby jwolfe » 2013-08-20, 1:16

Thank you very much for the response. I just wanted to clarify to make sure I understand what you are saying...So would using the term 'grace' instead of 'thank' be an equivalent expression? Someone did something nice for you and instead of saying 'thank you', it would be 'grace you'? or more like 'grace upon you'? 'grace to you'.

Jennifer

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Re: Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

Postby modus.irrealis » 2013-08-20, 8:08

Basically the Greek word χάρις had a broad range of meanings, so when they used the expression I gave you (which literally means "I have grace to you"), I don't know how prominent the "grace" meaning would be. I'd say it's like in English with "say grace", which to me at least doesn't have much to do with "grace".

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Re: Ancient Greek translation and english phonetic equivalent

Postby Babelfish » 2013-08-23, 15:45

(IMHO it might be akin to Latin "grātiās tibī agō", where "grātia" is grace also in the meaning of favor, gratitude, thanks)


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