Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

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linguoboy
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby linguoboy » 2019-09-25, 16:03

Yasna wrote:This could be completely wrong, but maybe 扎 (za1) is being pushed towards zha1 by 夹 (jia1), which has a pretty similar meaning (to clamp) and is used in phrases related to hair styling.

I think a more likely source of influence is the general tendency of speakers in half of China to confuse the alveolar and retroflex series. I've heard a fair amount of hypercorrection (e.g. 從 pronounced chóng) over the years.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Saim » 2019-11-15, 18:52

In the animated series 择天记 they constantly refer to the place they're in for most of the plot as 神都, and this is translated as "the capital" in the English subtitles. According to all the dictionaries I've consulted, 神 means God, whereas capital would be 首都. Is this some sort of play on words or am I missing something here?

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby linguoboy » 2019-11-15, 19:15

神都 ("divine metropolis") was a name used for the capital city of Luoyang during the reign of Empress Wu. I take it that's when the action is set?
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Saim » 2019-11-15, 19:25

linguoboy wrote:神都 ("divine metropolis") was a name used for the capital city of Luoyang during the reign of Empress Wu. I take it that's when the action is set?


It’s set in a fictional world with magic and demons, but given a lot of the references to Taoism and issues surrounding different members of the royal family I wouldn’t be surprised for there to be references to real history. I just wasn’t sure whether this is a real word or „just” a placename. Thanks!

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Yasna » 2019-11-16, 1:35

Saim wrote:In the animated series 择天记 they constantly refer to the place they're in for most of the plot as 神都, and this is translated as "the capital" in the English subtitles. According to all the dictionaries I've consulted, 神 means God, whereas capital would be 首都. Is this some sort of play on words or am I missing something here?

That strikes me as a typical fantasy/mythical place name, in the same vein as 魔都.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby VDNB-Vidan » 2020-01-01, 23:28

Happy New Year!

How to translate this in Chinese:

Time and my right

in Latin it is Tempus et meum jus
in Russian Время и мое право
in French Le temps et mon droit

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Saim » 2020-03-25, 6:55

What sort of connotations does the expression 中港台 have? I just came across it on BBC Chinese, I imagine it's not really used on the Mainland?

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby jazyk » 2020-05-26, 21:22

Saim wrote:What sort of connotations does the expression 中港台 have? I just came across it on BBC Chinese, I imagine it's not really used on the Mainland?


By juxtaposing 中(中国, China), 港(香港, Hong Kong) and 台(台湾, Taiwan), this expression to some extent implies that China, Hong Kong and Taiwan are entities of the same administrative level, i.e. countries. However, Hong Kong is a special administrative region within the country of China, and from a Mainland perspective Taiwan is considered as province of China. Therefore, this expression is considered not in line with the one-China principle that the Beijing government holds and is actually banned in Chinese media by the National Radio and Television Administration (NRTA). In contrast, another expression, 港澳台, where Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan are listed in parallel, appears quite often in Mainland Chinese sources as these three political entities are considered at the same administrative level.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby douyacai » 2020-09-07, 3:10

jazyk wrote:
Saim wrote:What sort of connotations does the expression 中港台 have? I just came across it on BBC Chinese, I imagine it's not really used on the Mainland?


By juxtaposing 中(中国, China), 港(香港, Hong Kong) and 台(台湾, Taiwan), this expression to some extent implies that China, Hong Kong and Taiwan are entities of the same administrative level, i.e. countries. However, Hong Kong is a special administrative region within the country of China, and from a Mainland perspective Taiwan is considered as province of China. Therefore, this expression is considered not in line with the one-China principle that the Beijing government holds and is actually banned in Chinese media by the National Radio and Television Administration (NRTA). In contrast, another expression, 港澳台, where Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan are listed in parallel, appears quite often in Mainland Chinese sources as these three political entities are considered at the same administrative level.


Agreed. This perfectly explained on the expression issue from the political point of view. This is helpful for Chinese learners caring about cultural sensitivity.

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-09, 14:39

In the following image, it says the same thing three times. I know that the first two characters are 大上 but I don't know the third one. It may have been made by someone who did not know the characters well either, so they may be distorted. The way that third character looks rather different in the first two versions versus the third one makes me especially suspect this.
It is from a ceremonial stamp from the Yao people, who do not generally know Chinese but use Chinese characters for religious matters.
Image
Can anyone identify the last character (the one repeated three times in the image below). In the third version it looks somewhat like 无 with additional strokes. Does anyone know what this character is, or know the meaning of the whole thing?
Image

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby linguoboy » 2020-10-09, 15:04

Looks to me like 老: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%80%81#Chinese.

太上老君 is a Daoist deity. I'm not sure if there's any connexion to the Yao personage or not.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-09, 16:43

linguoboy wrote:Looks to me like 老: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%80%81#Chinese.

太上老君 is a Daoist deity. I'm not sure if there's any connexion to the Yao personage or not.

Thanks! That helps. I will have to research to see if there is a connection to 太上老君. I believe the stamp is used in ceremonies dedicated to 盘王, a variant of 盘古. In any case 老 definitely makes sense, thanks!


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