Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby schnaz » 2017-10-23, 7:03

My understanding of what a morpheme is is that it is what you get when you break a word down till you can't break it down to any smaller pieces and still have meaning. So for example the word "irrevocably" can be broken down into "ir"' "re"voc"and"ably" and these are the morphemes of the word "irrevocably". Does Chinese have any morphemes?
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-08, 3:18

Of course. I think probably most Chinese characters are morphemes.

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-27, 16:23

I'm curious does Taiwan use the same character list as mainland China?
I've tried doing a bit of research on it, but I have yet to find a definitive answer.

I would suspect that even if they use a "different" list, it's largely the same. I just want to know if there are any differences.

And no, I'm not talking about the simplified vs. traditional thing here. :P
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-27, 17:09

vijayjohn wrote:Of course. I think probably most Chinese characters are morphemes.

There are a few exceptions, e.g. 葡萄, 蝴蝶. Despite being two-character compounds, these are monomorphemic.

I'm not sure if the argument works the other way, e.g. is 甭 (from a contraction of 不用) analysed as a single morpheme or two?
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby Ser » 2018-02-27, 19:15

księżycowy wrote:I'm curious does Taiwan use the same character list as mainland China?
I've tried doing a bit of research on it, but I have yet to find a definitive answer.

I would suspect that even if they use a "different" list, it's largely the same. I just want to know if there are any differences.

And no, I'm not talking about the simplified vs. traditional thing here. :P

I think the answer is likely to be "yes, they use the same 'list'", but what do you have in mind, theoretically speaking, if there were any differences?

It's still worth pointing out that as far as the printed standards go, some simplified characters correspond to two different traditional ones. Reality on the ground is a little messy though.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-27, 20:26

I'm not sure if I had anything in particular in mind, as I am just beginning to dive into these waters in general.

I think I just wanted to be sure, because I know that there are pronunciation differences, some words have been borrowed into Taiwanese Mandarin from Taiwanese Hokkien, etc. So I was ready to hear anything. :P

Though I suspected that they would, by and large, use the same "list" of characters for most types of written materials.

It's still worth pointing out that as far as the printed standards go, some simplified characters correspond to two different traditional ones. Reality on the ground is a little messy though.

That's interesting, thanks.

Any recommendations on resources for learning traditional characters? (reference materials, character dictionaries, etc) I expect my course to do a good portion of the work here, but some additional materials never hurt. :wink:

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-27, 20:31

księżycowy wrote:I think I just wanted to be sure, because I know that there are pronunciation differences, some words have been borrowed into Taiwanese Mandarin from Taiwanese Hokkien, etc.

Those are very colloquial. I learned to speak Chinese using Taiwanese materials and they didn't include any Hokkien borrowings. I don't recall any English borrowings either, even though those are becoming common in the PRC as well.
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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-27, 20:51

linguoboy wrote:Those are very colloquial. I learned to speak Chinese using Taiwanese materials and they didn't include any Hokkien borrowings. I don't recall any English borrowings either, even though those are becoming common in the PRC as well.

I get that. But sometimes those colloquial terms have a way of weaseling their way into the standard.

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby langbox » 2018-03-19, 5:14

linguoboy wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Of course. I think probably most Chinese characters are morphemes.

There are a few exceptions, e.g. 葡萄, 蝴蝶. Despite being two-character compounds, these are monomorphemic.

I'm not sure if the argument works the other way, e.g. is 甭 (from a contraction of 不用) analysed as a single morpheme or two?


Very good point!

I guess many "load words" like the 葡萄 and 蝴蝶 are monomorphemic, and I can easily think out a few more like the 咖啡(coffee)、巧克力(chocolate)、沙发(sofa)、扑克 (poker)、爵士(jazz)...

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-09, 3:12

Ow! All these examples hurt my brain. I need an 阿司匹林. :silly:

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Re: Questions about Chinese / 关于中文的问题 / 關於中文的問題

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-11, 9:42

I've started trying to watch a Taiwanese (Mandarin) movie from 1991 called 五个女子和一根绳子 (translated into English as "Five Girls and a Rope"), apparently about sexism in rural (feudal?) China. I was trying to learn some new phrases, but I'm confused by some of them.

One term they use is 沤臭. The English subtitles seem to suggest that means 'to decay'. Does that sound about right? Is it pronounced ōuchòu or òuchòu?

Does 吃一口井长大 mean 'to grow up together (in the same hometown)'?

The most confusing part for me is the introduction to the main characters, particularly when they're talking about how old they are. The first one is twenty years old, and they describe her as "二十齐头." What does 齐头 mean? Something like 'altogether'?

The third one apparently just turned nineteen when the story started, so they describe her as 刚满十九. Does 刚满 mean something like 'just turned'? Does 齐头 have a similar meaning?

The second one is sixteen, and to describe her age, they use the phrase 吃十六的饭. What does that mean?


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