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uilux

Postby uilux » 2004-09-22, 0:22

huzi wrote:HAHA,Hello boys and girls.I am From GuangDong China.

Nice to meet you at this forum.

My english is very pool,sorry,haha.so funny.

你好啊,胡子。
我在MSN上看到你了。
我来这里的时间也不长,只有一个多月。觉得这里还算不错。希望你能够喜欢! :)

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Postby 勺园之鬼 » 2004-09-22, 8:23

哇噻,真高兴你们中国朋友来这里解决人家的问题!呵呵……我可能不太适合回答问题……我的汉语学了已经几年了,而我在中国生活的时间比较长,不过我现在回国了,要毕业了,可能不会有时间了……
uilux,你是做什么的?专门学英语的吗?英语也难学,我学不到个好水平……还有,你写你从tai'an来,这是什么地方?哪个省的城市?我可能已经去过了,只是看拼音想不起来是什么地方……
四海为家

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Postby 勺园之鬼 » 2004-09-22, 8:26

uilux wrote:
灰鹰(Gray Eagle) wrote:大家好!
我叫Arsenii. 我过去自学了汉语,可现在时间不够。我只要提高我的水平。希望你们能帮我一手(这样对不对?有一次我从一个香港人听到了这样的话)。
我有几个饿汉课本,会话手册,各种各样的书但我没有机会练习口语。
Arsenii

不好意思问一下,“饿汉课本”是什么? 是不是“俄汉课本”?


他肯定知道,很有可能打错了……
四海为家

uilux

Postby uilux » 2004-09-22, 12:39

JunMing wrote:哇噻,真高兴你们中国朋友来这里解决人家的问题!呵呵……我可能不太适合回答问题……我的汉语学了已经几年了,而我在中国生活的时间比较长,不过我现在回国了,要毕业了,可能不会有时间了……
uilux,你是做什么的?专门学英语的吗?英语也难学,我学不到个好水平……还有,你写你从tai'an来,这是什么地方?哪个省的城市?我可能已经去过了,只是看拼音想不起来是什么地方……

我不是学英语专业的。为什么JunMing这么问呢?我的专业是工业设计(Industrial design)。但我现在因为做过手术而在家休养,所以有时间来给大家帮忙。
Tai'an 泰安。山东省的一个中型城市。泰山(Mount. Tai)你知道吗?就在我们这里。 :)

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Postby 灰鹰(Gray Eagle) » 2004-09-23, 19:23

当然写错了!俄汉。。。
你们都怎么找到了这个讨论会?

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Postby proycon » 2004-09-27, 9:12

大家好!

I'm writing a Mandarin Chinese pronunciation guide for UniLang, and I need some help from native chinese speakers, mainly for recording sound samples..

Please check the forum thread here:
http://home.unilang.org/forum/viewtopic ... 2504#62504

谢谢你! :)
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uilux

Postby uilux » 2004-09-27, 15:39

Hi, proycon,
I'll be glad to help you. But I know too little about computer and Internet. So, if you think I could be helpful, just tell me. And also tell me what should I do.

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Postby proycon » 2004-09-27, 15:53

You won't need to know alot :)

You can just post anything for steps 1 and 2 here in the forum-thread I opened for it : http://home.unilang.org/forum/viewtopic ... 2504#62504

First I'd like more hanzi example per-sound, so if you could just write them there, I will put it in the guide :)
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Postby projetdefleur » 2004-09-30, 5:20

你门好吗?

I just started learning chinese tonight :) I hope my studies go well.

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i am a newbie

Postby egoleo » 2004-12-14, 20:21

i am a Ghanaian who just love to learn every stuff abt chinese. so i first decide to learn chinese lang. which one is widely spoken.
anyway anyone here to help me out with pronounciations of words since i have this site and a book to learn it. just mail me :D :lol:

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Postby dorenda » 2004-12-15, 16:18

This may be a silly question, but how do you type Chinese? Cause there aren't enough keys on a keyboard to have one for every character.
I'm not learning Chinese, but I just wondered about this.

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Postby schalke81 » 2004-12-15, 16:26

dor&da wrote:This may be a silly question, but how do you type Chinese? Cause there aren't enough keys on a keyboard to have one for every character.
I'm not learning Chinese, but I just wondered about this.


i safely assume that the chinese keyboard is the same as the Japanese, at least in writing kanji...

in Japanese, you write in kana and then you press the spacebar whenever you want and it will change the kana automatically to the kanji...of course they are often choices of kanji, so you may then have to select one different from what the computer chose..

At my work, there are a lot of chinese staff who write in chinese and forget to change the keyboard back to Japanese or English...from my experinece of not realising the keyboard is still in chinese, they write the phonetics of each kanji character and then have to chose one before they can write the next....this is how i ofund out but i am sure there is a special way to get around this rather monotonous task!

uilux

Postby uilux » 2004-12-17, 14:23

Many ways you can type Chinese characters . The easiest is with the pronunciation. We can use only 25 letter indicating the Chinese pronunciation. So just type these letters and a list of characters will appear. Then you choose the proper character. Proficient users use a method called “ Wu bi zi xing” . it is a little difficult. Its inventor studied the structure of characters, and found there are many common parts of all the characters. He divided these parts into five groups and allocate them on twenty five keys. Every time you want to type a character, you first disassemble it into parts, and strike the keys for the first, second, third and last part, then a character appears on the screen. Also you can only use the first two parts to represent a character, and you only need to strike your keyboard two times. If you can use this method skillfully, it take you only one minute to type 170 characters.

Nedell

hi

Postby Nedell » 2004-12-20, 9:55

DO you know this site?? sinohispania.metropoliglobal.com

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Postby Raza » 2004-12-21, 22:54

I would really like to know how Chinese deals with new vocabulary in their lexicon. When a new modern concept is introduced such as DVD player, X-ray, internet etc. do they devise a brand new character to represent those terms. I'm presuming Chinese mainly uses compounding to make up new words such as internet, or even perhaps a little bit of morphological derivation.

But let's say, someone wanted to create a brand new character from scratch to represent internet or X-ray, then who or which authority is in charge to take such an initiative. Would that authority be in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan or even Singapore? Or is there some kind of an international Chinese language committee made up of Chinese language scholars that undertakes these tasks?

Tatoo

你们好

Postby Tatoo » 2005-01-03, 18:54

我是法国人(girl ^^)也我17岁了, 我住在 Le Mans (法国的西)。我学汉语3年了,而是我想我的汉语不好。我希望你们能帮我改善它 ^.~
Bye bye~~... :)

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Postby alois » 2005-01-04, 2:09

proycon wrote:I'm writing a Mandarin Chinese pronunciation guide for UniLang, and I need some help from native chinese speakers, mainly for recording sound samples..


I've been taking a look at the IPA table of the guide you wrote and the only difference I found between the IPA transcription for the "zh" and "ch" consonants is that one (ch) is the aspirated version of the other (zh) while I think to that one should also change the "zh" pronunciation into a voiced retroflex fricative (at least that's the way I've noticed it). Aren't they voiced at all? Or does that vary from dialect to dialect (I'm sure it does, but I, who am not a phonetics expert myself, am just wondering about that since I always found them quite voiced, though letting doubts arise sometimes).

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-01-04, 2:15

Hefestos wrote:I'm I've been taking a look at the IPA table of the guide you wrote and the only difference I found between the IPA transcription for the "zh" and "ch" consonants is that one (ch) is the aspirated version of the other (zh) while I think to that one should also change the "zh" pronunciation into a voiced retroflex fricative (at least that's the way I've noticed it). Aren't they voiced at all? Or does that vary from dialect to dialect (I'm sure it does, but I, who am not a phonetics expert myself, am just wondering about that since I always found them quite voiced, though letting doubts arise sometimes).

Well, I'm far from an expert, but the way I've always been taught is that indeed, they're all unvoiced, and the only difference between such pairs (ch/zh, c/z etc.) is that the first element is aspirated and the second isn't. Foreigners often seem to fall into the voiced/unvoiced distinction, though. And, like you pointed yourself, I know nothing of dialectal variations in order to say there wouldn't be any that did have a voicing distinction.
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uilux

Postby uilux » 2005-01-04, 3:36

Yes, you are right Psi-lord. It is true that in modern Mandarin all the consonants are unvoiced. The “zh” and “z” are unaspirated, while “ch” and “c” are aspirated. Even the consonants “r” “l” and “m” “n” are half-voiced.
But you know that in China, there are many different dialects. And in some of the dialects, voiced consonants do exist. Such as the Min and Wu dialect.
Wu dialect has the voiced “d”, “b”, “g” and “zh” sound. And in Min “b” “g” and “z”.
Other dialects such as Hakka, Yue and even old Xiang also have voiced consonants.

uilux

Re: 你们好

Postby uilux » 2005-01-04, 4:01

Tatoo wrote:我是法国人(girl ^^)也我17岁了, 我住在 Le Mans (法国的西)。我学汉语3年了,而是我想我的汉语不好。我希望你们能帮我改善它 ^.~
Bye bye~~... :)

Ah, yes, tatoo,
Here I can give you some correction or suggestion to your sentences:
You wrote:“我是法国人,也我十七岁了”。
Here you should say: “我是法国人,我十七岁了”。
Maybe in English and French there is a word “and” or “et” between “我是法国人”and “我十七岁”, but in Chinese, there isn’t. You can use a comma instead of the “and”.
I read in a map that you hometown’s name is “勒芒”, and is it in Sarthe?
The characters in the brackets, “法国的西”?? I think “法国的西部” will be better.
“我学汉语三年了,而是我的汉语不好
Here use “但是”, not “而是”.
The last sentence, “我希望你们能帮我改善它”。
“改善”is not very good, you can use “改正” or “提高”。And the first “我” can be omitted.
An only 17-year-old girl, but has studied Chinese for three years, so, Tatoo, you are great!!


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