Discrimination

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linguoboy
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Re: Discrimination

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-05, 16:32

TheStrayCat wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:My understanding is that there are even some neighborhoods that are entirely Asian, but I don't recall actually seeing any off the top of my head and am not sure how common that is in the US as a whole.

This map is a good source. Chicago's Chinatown is a very visible red spot on the map (even though it's not that big compared to the predominantly Hispanic/African American areas to the south) as well as several places in New York (like Flushing). Los Angeles has some Asian-populated areas as well, but I'm not familiar at all with the layout of this city so I cannot say more than the map.

LA has what's been called the first Asian-American suburb, Monterey Park. It's since spawned a host of others. There are also Asian "ethnoburbs" in the Bay Area, such as Milpitas (62% Asian-American) and Daly City (55%). Cupertino is 65% Asian-American, the highest percentage of any city in the USA. (Flushing is 69% Asian-American, but it's a neighbourhood within Queens rather than a city of its own.)

This is primarily an immigrant phenomenon, however. Second- and third-generation US-born Asian-Americans (who outnumber the newcomers) prefer neighbourhoods that are majority White.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Prowler
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Re: Discrimination

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-06, 5:53

linguoboy wrote:
TheStrayCat wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:My understanding is that there are even some neighborhoods that are entirely Asian, but I don't recall actually seeing any off the top of my head and am not sure how common that is in the US as a whole.

This map is a good source. Chicago's Chinatown is a very visible red spot on the map (even though it's not that big compared to the predominantly Hispanic/African American areas to the south) as well as several places in New York (like Flushing). Los Angeles has some Asian-populated areas as well, but I'm not familiar at all with the layout of this city so I cannot say more than the map.

LA has what's been called the first Asian-American suburb, Monterey Park. It's since spawned a host of others. There are also Asian "ethnoburbs" in the Bay Area, such as Milpitas (62% Asian-American) and Daly City (55%). Cupertino is 65% Asian-American, the highest percentage of any city in the USA. (Flushing is 69% Asian-American, but it's a neighbourhood within Queens rather than a city of its own.)

This is primarily an immigrant phenomenon, however. Second- and third-generation US-born Asian-Americans (who outnumber the newcomers) prefer neighbourhoods that are majority White.

Off-topic but Alhambra sounds like a funny and familiar name. I could see that being a word in Portuguese due to the "lh".

Anyway, I've always wondered how often such issues are discussed in the USA outside of the media. Like, I dunno, on a daily basis in major cities is racial tension visible? And for those of you who lived in Europe, Australia, Asia, South America, etc. how would you compare the realities you've experienced back home and abroad?

I can't help but notice that lots of North Americans use football hooliganism as their argument for European racism. And ofc, the migrant crisis and its opponents, including many politicians, adds more fuel to the fire.

Personal anecdote but I remember several years ago on another forum, some American guy who apparently was Asian(South East Asia, can't remember the countries his family came from) asking me if he'd risk getting harassed or killed if he were to travel in my own country... which I assumed was just he being tongue-in-cheek since he always seemed to be a bit of a joker in a weird way, but it's so easy to spread misinformation and stereotypes about certain countries that you always wonder if there might not be something more behind it and what kind of image your country or region is giving to the world. :hmm:

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Re: Discrimination

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-06, 8:46

Prowler wrote:Like, I dunno, on a daily basis in major cities is racial tension visible?

Yes.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-06, 22:01

vijayjohn wrote:
Prowler wrote:Like, I dunno, on a daily basis in major cities is racial tension visible?

Yes.

Do you feel that on a daily basis where you live? Like what, you approach a white or a black person and they might give you a dirty look or distrust you at first before getting to know you better?

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Re: Discrimination

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-06, 23:30

Prowler wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Prowler wrote:Like, I dunno, on a daily basis in major cities is racial tension visible?

Yes.

Do you feel that on a daily basis where you live?

No, but Austin is not a particularly big city by US standards (even though I'm sure it is by Portuguese standards :P).
EDIT:
linguoboy wrote:Second- and third-generation US-born Asian-Americans (who outnumber the newcomers) prefer neighbourhoods that are majority White.

This reminded me of American Desi. :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbUp6srVMRQ
(Lol the guy who plays Salim pronounced "Shabana" wrong).

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Re: Discrimination

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-07, 8:14

Nearly 1M population and metro area with over 2M people. Also 11th ranked city by population in your country.

Your city is big, man. Not "big" like New York or Los Angeles but definitely above average.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-07, 14:00

Yes, but that doesn't mean that I automatically assume people are going to think of it as a "major city" when it's unlikely they would have even heard about it before meeting me given that it's just some place in Texas and not as big as Houston, for instance. :P I thought you meant "like New York or Los Angeles." (Besides, it's a fast-growing city, so as I understand it, it only recently became as big as it is now).

Anyway, I think the extent to which racial tension is visible depends on which city you're talking about.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-07, 15:01

I'm trying to figure out what counts as "visible racial tension". There's a lot of tension in this city, so much you have to screen it out if you're going to keep your sanity while commuting and shopping. I'm not sure how much of it could be classed as specifically "racial" though. I mean, if I walk under the viaduct at the el stop nearest me this evening, I'll pass three Black guys with posters railing against White oppression. It doesn't get much more visible than that. But that's 30 seconds out of my whole week.
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Re: Discrimination

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-07, 23:50

I'd count that as "visible racial tension," and for the purpose of answering the question as to whether it is or isn't, I'm not sure it matters how long it lasts. I've only run into Greenpeace activists twice in my whole life; that didn't last long, either (even if it was more than 30 seconds :P), but it was certainly memorable and was enough for me to get certain ideas as to what Greenpeace is like. Idk.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-08, 2:23

vijayjohn wrote:I'd count that as "visible racial tension," and for the purpose of answering the question as to whether it is or isn't, I'm not sure it matters how long it lasts.

But the question was "Like, I dunno, on a daily basis in major cities is racial tension visible?" As I said, that's clearly racial tension, but it's not visible on a daily basis. (The guys only do this once a week and I didn't happen to walk by them this evening--I was at another translation salon--so I didn't experience even that thirty seconds.)

There is plenty of visible tension in this city, but how much of it is "racial"? For instance, stand on any street corner downtown and you'll see pedestrians visibly tense as they walk past panhandlers. Some will go well out of their way to avoid them. You see the same thing every day on the el. Generally the panhandlers are African-American and the people passing by are not. Does that make the tension "racial"?

Prowler, if you could give me some concrete examples of what kind of behaviour you have in mind, that would go a long way in helping me answer your question.
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Re: Discrimination

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-08, 2:38

I've seen often the term "racial tension" popping up in the last few years. If I had to guess it's animosity between certain groups. As for it being visible, well I'm not asking for the most extreme examples such as violence in the ghetto between rival gangs or anything like that, but I dunno, people voluntarily segregating themselves on their day to day lives. Only/mostly having friends and wanting to get acquainted with people of their "race" . And do people of certain "races" feel unwelcome if they go to a bar or a place that's primarily frequented by people of a different "race than theirs?

Hard to make it a proper comparison, but here, if a family of gypsies enters a hospital waiting room or a café there will be a feeling of uneasiness in the air.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-08, 2:45

Prowler wrote:As for it being visible, well I'm not asking for the most extreme examples such as violence in the ghetto between rival gangs or anything like that, but I dunno, people voluntarily segregating themselves on their day to day lives. Only/mostly having friends and wanting to get acquainted with people of their "race" .

Well, sure, there's plenty of that (if I understood you correctly). For instance, like I said, when my parents throw a party or attend another one, both the host and (almost) all the guests are Malayalee. (Okay, that may be a relatively mild example, and they do sometimes attend/host neighborhood parties and of course host or visit (non-Malayalee) relatives, but still).

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Re: Discrimination

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-08, 2:51

vijayjohn wrote:
Prowler wrote:As for it being visible, well I'm not asking for the most extreme examples such as violence in the ghetto between rival gangs or anything like that, but I dunno, people voluntarily segregating themselves on their day to day lives. Only/mostly having friends and wanting to get acquainted with people of their "race" .

Well, sure, there's plenty of that (if I understood you correctly). For instance, like I said, when my parents throw a party or attend another one, both the host and almost all the guests are Malayalee. (Okay, that may be a relatively mild example, and they do sometimes attend/host neighborhood parties and of course host or visit (non-Malayalee) relatives, but still).

Funny since this reminds me of this time I had a weird dream about my grandfather(who died like 5 years before I was born, meaning I only saw him in pictures) being friends with Mike Tyson of all people and inviting him to a party at, I assume, our home. When I told my mom later that day about my dream she laughed and said that "well first of all, I don't think I'd invite black people to our home" and then she mentioned that Mike Tyson didn't seem like a very nice individual considering he liked to bite people's ears off.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby Hent » 2017-10-06, 8:01

So one of the parties (Blok proti Islámu) has a TV ad like any other party, but it depicts white people dressed up like a Middle Eastern family and kicking into some Czech granny's walker making her fall and then running away towards some welfare bureau. It kind of reminds me of pre-war Jewish caricatures.

Now I know they won't get enough votes, but it's pretty offensive IMO.

Another far-right party called SPD (not to be confused with the German SPD) is probably gonna get 6%+ , but their commercial spot is not as harsh.

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Re: Discrimination

Postby Aurinĭa » 2017-10-06, 11:04

Dr. House wrote:So one of the parties (Blok proti Islámu) has a TV ad like any other party, but it depicts white people dressed up like a Middle Eastern family and kicking into some Czech granny's walker making her fall and then running away towards some welfare bureau. It kind of reminds me of pre-war Jewish caricatures.

Now I know they won't get enough votes, but it's pretty offensive IMO.

Here, that would definitely be banned as hate speech/inciting racial hatred.


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