USA Presidential Election 2012

This forum is the place to have more serious discussions about politics and religion, and your opinions thereof. Be courteous!

Moderator: Forum Administrators

Forum rules
When a registered user insults another person (user or not), nation, political group or religious group, s/he will be deprived of her/his permission to post in the forum. That user has the right to re-register one week after s/he has lost the permission. Further violations will result in longer prohibitions.

By default, you are automatically registered to post in this forum. However, users cannot post in the politics forum during the first week after registration. Users can also not make their very first post in the politics forum.

Who would you vote for?

Poll ended at 2012-11-08, 15:51

Image Barack Obama / Joe Biden (Democratic Party)
17
57%
Image Mitt Romney / Paul Ryan (Republican Party)
2
7%
Image Gary Johnson / James Gray (Libertarian Party)
2
7%
Image Jill Stein / Cheri Honkala (Green Party)
9
30%
Image Virgil Goode / Jim Clymer (Constitution Party)
0
No votes
Image Rocky Anderson / Luis J. Rodriguez (Justice Party)
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 30

User avatar
johnklepac
Posts: 2809
Joined: 2012-12-06, 2:18
Real Name: Your Onions
Gender: male
Location: Chicago/Southwest Ohio
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: USA Presidential Election 2012

Postby johnklepac » 2012-12-31, 22:17

Image

Not too surprised, but I voted for Obama because I knew no one but him or Romney would win in my state (actually, since I live in a strong blue state, Romney wouldn't have won anyway).

User avatar
johnklepac
Posts: 2809
Joined: 2012-12-06, 2:18
Real Name: Your Onions
Gender: male
Location: Chicago/Southwest Ohio
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: USA Presidential Election 2012

Postby johnklepac » 2012-12-31, 22:30

linguoboy wrote:I don't get the feeling that most liberals are interested in electoral reform per se--it's too wonkish and confusing for most people. They only get engaged if they can see a clear advantage for the people they like.

For instance, look at all the outrage over voter disenfranchisement this year. Republicans have figured out that greater turnout disproportionately benefits the Democrats, so they initiated measures to reduce it (under the cover of fighting "voter fraud"). Democrats sought to have many of these blocked in the courts on the basis that they mostly impacted lower-income and minority voters--who happen to be among those most likely to vote Democratic.

But if, say, those being kept away from the polls were mostly Republicans, would the Good Liberals be making much noise? They seem quite fine with the fact that in, some states, convicted felons are disenfrachised for life, regardless of how long it's been since they've served their time, and that most states restrict their voting rights in one way or another.

The real problem is that what's best for the electorate (i.e. more choice, more turnover) is worst for the incumbents--regardless of party affiliation--and it's the politicians in power who would have to approve the changes. I really don't see a way forward without a massive shift in political consciousness among hoi polloi.


I'm a pretty hardcore liberal (and I mean that I only take issue with a few traditionally liberal issues like race-based affirmative action and absolute gun control), but I can't ever see myself ever honestly being happy about people never making it to the polls, no matter whom they'd have voted for. However, this is largely because criminal justice is one of my pet issues, and I agree with you about most liberals (but the same is true for most conservatives).


Return to “Politics and Religion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest