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Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-06-27, 13:47
by Levo
linguoboy wrote:
Levo wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Levo wrote:As far as i'm concerned in the USA such things exist as nationwide minimum salary?

There is a minimum hourly wage (currently $7.25).

So it actually does exist

Um, no. A wage is not a salary. If you're an hourly employee working twenty hours one week and five ours the next, you get paid for twenty-five hours. If you're salaried, you get paid the same semimonthly stipend no matter how many hours you worked. There's no minimum number of hours an employee needs to be given and, therefore, no minimum monthly or yearly earnings.

Levo wrote:
linguoboy wrote:[The median household income of Maryland is over $67,000. In Mississippi, it barely tops $39,000.

I understand what you would like to point at, comparing it to our situation. But here the difference is around X4 between EU-15 and EU-newer Central-European states.

Here's the difference: Maryland and Mississippi have been part of the same federal union for just shy of 200 years; the gap has shrunk enormously, but it still persists. Hungary hasn't even been part of the EU for ten. I suspect people's expectations of the benefits of accession (and the speed with which they would be delivered) were less than realistic.


Who told you we had expectations like that?
I mentioned already in this topic that I'm bringing it up here only, because Turkey would face similar problems (just with even worse standards than in my example) and we still have so big differences within EU already. And being called an "equal citizen" in EU, then, no matter how embarrasing it is for more developed states, I have the right to stand for these rights :) Not if I wasn't happy the way I am already. But in theory, I could vie for the implementation of these rights, don't I? :wink: Like minorities for minority rights or women for equal pay. (And I don't even want an equal pay, just an equal purchase power locally for the same job).
If someone wants another 80 million people like that, then face this factor.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-06-27, 14:26
by linguoboy
Levo wrote:(And I don't even want an equal pay, just an equal purchase power locally for the same job).

This is a prime example of American-European culture clash. I don't think many Americans would agree that you have a "right" to that. In this country, if you don't like the market conditions where you are, you move.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-06-27, 16:49
by TeneReef
Croatia will be entering the EU in 4 day's time.
Say welcome to EU's Puerto Rico. :rotfl:

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-06-28, 12:42
by Levo
TeneReef wrote:Croatia will be entering the EU in 4 day's time.
Say welcome to EU's Puerto Rico. :rotfl:

I did :D

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-07-01, 0:22
by IpseDixit
TeneReef wrote:Say welcome to EU's Puerto Rico. :rotfl:


Culturally, economically or what else?

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-07-02, 18:17
by linguoboy
IpseDixit wrote:
TeneReef wrote:Say welcome to EU's Puerto Rico. :rotfl:

Culturally, economically or what else?

Musically! Turbo folk--it's the salsa of Europe.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2013-07-03, 8:39
by mōdgethanc
linguoboy wrote:Musically! Turbo folk--it's the salsa of Europe.
As long as it's not the reggaetón.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 17:20
by Multiturquoise
I've already voted against Turkey joining the EU, and I'll explain my reason with more details:

Turkey is a country where many locals hate foreigners, especially non-Muslims. It praises Daesh, a bunch of terrorists whose hobby is beheading people. I've never been hostile, but always been friendly to foreigners I saw. I hate Turkey being a radical Islamic country nowadays. I'm not a Muslim and I'm against the hostility against people. By the way, even 100 years passed from the genocide, Turkey still denies the Armenian genocide and condemns the countries which recognise these events as genocide. I agree that 1.5 million Armenians were really killed by the Ottoman Empire (present-day Turkey). Because of that, I'll never vote yes to Turkey's accession to the EU. Turkey can only enter the EU if they recognise the Armenian genocide, stop supporting and funding terrorism, and make Christianity the official religion of the country.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 17:47
by Levike
Elaine wrote:and make Christianity the official religion of the country.

What? That doesn't make any sense. Not even half of the country is Christian, why would they do that?

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 18:04
by Multiturquoise
Levike wrote:
Elaine wrote:and make Christianity the official religion of the country.

What? That doesn't make any sense. Not even half of the country is Christian, why would they do that?


But Turkey's soil is historically Christian. The first churches were built in Anatolia.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 18:10
by Levike
Elaine wrote:But Turkey's soil is historically Christian. The first churches were built in Anatolia.

And Greece's soil historically belongs to Zeus and his fellow gods.

Following your logic you'd also have to erase Turkish as the official language.

The "soil" belongs to the people living on it (to those who "own" it).

And according to Wikipedia the majority of Turkey's population is Muslim (>90%), that is you'd have to force 70+ million people change their culture or at least accept another religion as their country's new official religion.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 20:52
by linguoboy
Levike wrote:
Elaine wrote:and make Christianity the official religion of the country.

What? That doesn't make any sense. Not even half of the country is Christian, why would they do that?

Not only is this an extremely illiberal policy, it flies in the face of trends in the EU (and the Western world in general). The only remaining EU countries with a state religion are England, Finland, Denmark (and its dependencies), Iceland, Malta, and Greece. Sweden disestablished its official church five years after joining and Iceland's Ásatrúarfélagið recently got permission to build a temple to the Norse gods in the capital.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 21:26
by Johanna
linguoboy wrote:Denmark (and its dependencies)

Neither the Faroes nor Greenland are members of the EU, so they don't really need to be mentioned here ;)

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-16, 21:41
by linguoboy
Johanna wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Denmark (and its dependencies)

Neither the Faroes nor Greenland are members of the EU, so they don't really need to be mentioned here ;)

Argh! I just read a summary of the political history of Greenland recently, but clearly I misunderstood this crucial point.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-17, 6:44
by Johanna
linguoboy wrote:Argh! I just read a summary of the political history of Greenland recently, but clearly I misunderstood this crucial point.

Well, they were a member, they became one when Denmark proper did since they were still an integrated part of it back then. However, a few years after they were granted home rule they opted to leave the union.

The Faroes have had home rule since the 1940's, so they've never been part of the EU.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-02-17, 12:44
by Aurinĭa
Iceland isn't a member either, nor will it become one (unless they change their mind again at some point in the future). They withdrew their application last year.

Re: Turkey in the EU

Posted: 2016-04-15, 15:14
by RubyH
… Exactly what would the benefit of joining the E.U. be say I … after reading threw the entire front of it and still nah, yeah something might be a benefit if ones already a member. But as a non member state it's literally not as if one couldn't just copy better laws and do things better.