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Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-04-22, 23:59
by Meera
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:How would you translate these two sentances in Japanese?

"I often ate hamburgers when I was a child."

"Takeshi did not study much when he was in high school."


They are two sentences I have to translate for homework and I can't find the answer anywhere. :?

子供の頃、よくハンバーガーを食べた。

高校生の頃、たけしはあまり勉強しなかった。


Hey Yasna, I'm sure these are right but the Genki book wants me to use the "-ました" and "-ませんでした". Sorry I probably should of put that in the question. :?

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-04-23, 0:36
by Yasna
Meera wrote:
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:How would you translate these two sentances in Japanese?

"I often ate hamburgers when I was a child."

"Takeshi did not study much when he was in high school."


They are two sentences I have to translate for homework and I can't find the answer anywhere. :?

子供の頃、よくハンバーガーを食べた。

高校生の頃、たけしはあまり勉強しなかった。


Hey Yasna, I'm sure these are right but the Genki book wants me to use the "-ました" and "-ませんでした". Sorry I probably should of put that in the question. :?

Oh, ok. Then 食べた becomes 食べました and 勉強しなかった becomes 勉強しませんでした. And then you should probably use たけしさん instead of just たけし.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-04-23, 2:49
by Meera
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:How would you translate these two sentances in Japanese?

"I often ate hamburgers when I was a child."

"Takeshi did not study much when he was in high school."


They are two sentences I have to translate for homework and I can't find the answer anywhere. :?

子供の頃、よくハンバーガーを食べた。

高校生の頃、たけしはあまり勉強しなかった。


Hey Yasna, I'm sure these are right but the Genki book wants me to use the "-ました" and "-ませんでした". Sorry I probably should of put that in the question. :?

Oh, ok. Then 食べた becomes 食べました and 勉強しなかった becomes 勉強しませんでした. And then you should probably use たけしさん instead of just たけし.


Thanks Yasna. :mrgreen: I think the book uses an overally formal version or a "childish" version maybe? Because before I posted here I asked some other people who are fammilair with Japanese and they gave me the same answear :P

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-04-23, 5:19
by Yasna
Meera wrote:Thanks Yasna. :mrgreen: I think the book uses an overally formal version or a "childish" version maybe?

Yeah, they use a higher register that is safer to use. If you're a beginner and you want to make sure you don't sound rude to anyone, the easiest thing to do is always use the -masu form. But for learning the language as a whole, the dictionary form of verbs (ends in ru, tsu, ku, etc.) is far more important because it is the base that allows you to construct all the different verb forms like causative, passive, imperative, etc. The magic of agglutination. You'll probably be reminded of Turkish at certain points.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-04-23, 20:42
by Meera
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:Thanks Yasna. :mrgreen: I think the book uses an overally formal version or a "childish" version maybe?

Yeah, they use a higher register that is safer to use. If you're a beginner and you want to make sure you don't sound rude to anyone, the easiest thing to do is always use the -masu form. But for learning the language as a whole, the dictionary form of verbs (ends in ru, tsu, ku, etc.) is far more important because it is the base that allows you to construct all the different verb forms like causative, passive, imperative, etc. The magic of agglutination. You'll probably be reminded of Turkish at certain points.


Yeah I have noticed a lot of similarities between Turkish and Japanese grammar so far. It's very interesting :mrgreen:

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-08-24, 17:28
by Meera
Hey guys I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this. But do you guys know of any podcasts in Japanese? Not for learning like JapanesePod, but something entirely in Japanese like news? I know it's kind of a weird question but when I'm walking my dog or at the gym I like to listen to stuff in the languages I'm learning :P

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-10-15, 16:59
by Meera
Hey everyone! I'm working on chapter 7 of Genki and I'm really confused about something. The book said there is a "short form" and a "long form" of -ている but doesn't give any examples of this. What is the difference between short and long? For example is スーさんはいまべんきょしています short or long form? There's also an exercise in the work book in chapter 7, where it has a list of verbs it then asks for you to give long forms and te forms? Do they want ています for the long form or just the regular ます form. Sorry I know it's a lot of questions but I'm so confused.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-10-15, 18:12
by Ciarán12
Meera wrote:Hey everyone! I'm working on chapter 7 of Genki and I'm really confused about something. The book said there is a "short form" and a "long form" of -ている but doesn't give any examples of this. What is the difference between short and long? For example is スーさんはいまべんきょしています short or long form? There's also an exercise in the work book in chapter 7, where it has a list of verbs it then asks for you to give long forms and te forms? Do they want ています for the long form or just the regular ます form. Sorry I know it's a lot of questions but I'm so confused.


-ている is the the short form and -ています is the long form. The structure is made up of the "te" form of a verb + "iru" (as in the verb "to be" for animate subjects). So its the same way that いる is the short form of that verb an います is the long form.

Also, just as a side note, frequently in speech and sometimes in informal writing the -ている ending gets shortened further to just -てる.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-10-15, 18:35
by Yasna
Meera wrote:There's also an exercise in the work book in chapter 7, where it has a list of verbs it then asks for you to give long forms and te forms? Do they want ています for the long form or just the regular ます form.

Looking at the example they give in the workbook, it looks like they want the regular -masu form for the long form section. So the first verb, わかる, would have a long form of わかります and a -te form of わかって.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-10-15, 19:14
by Meera
Ciarán12 wrote:
Meera wrote:Hey everyone! I'm working on chapter 7 of Genki and I'm really confused about something. The book said there is a "short form" and a "long form" of -ている but doesn't give any examples of this. What is the difference between short and long? For example is スーさんはいまべんきょしています short or long form? There's also an exercise in the work book in chapter 7, where it has a list of verbs it then asks for you to give long forms and te forms? Do they want ています for the long form or just the regular ます form. Sorry I know it's a lot of questions but I'm so confused.


-ている is the the short form and -ています is the long form. The structure is made up of the "te" form of a verb + "iru" (as in the verb "to be" for animate subjects). So its the same way that いる is the short form of that verb an います is the long form.

Also, just as a side note, frequently in speech and sometimes in informal writing the -ている ending gets shortened further to just -てる.


Arigato! That makes more sense now :mrgreen:

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-10-15, 19:21
by Meera
Yasna wrote:
Meera wrote:There's also an exercise in the work book in chapter 7, where it has a list of verbs it then asks for you to give long forms and te forms? Do they want ています for the long form or just the regular ます form.

Looking at the example they give in the workbook, it looks like they want the regular -masu form for the long form section. So the first verb, わかる, would have a long form of わかります and a -te form of わかって.


Thank you so much Yasna! I was so confused because they gave ある and they said ある cant be used with -te iru. So I was so confused if they wanted -te iru or just the regular te forms. I love Genki but it is conusing to use on your own sometimes.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-11-16, 9:07
by Koko
So from a friend I heard "one's favourite <thing> ___" has the construction "<namae> ga ichi sukina no <thing>." If this is true, then would "Rondo of Nightmare is my favourite Babymetal song now" be いま「Rondo of Nightmare」は おれ が 一 好きな の ベービーメタル の 唄 だ。 ?

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-11-16, 11:00
by hashi
Not quite:

One's favourite X, Y
Y ga ichiban daisuki na X
Yが一番大好きなX

The extra 'no' is not required as 'na' already serves this purpose. By that token, if we take your sentence, and assign X and Y:
"Rondo of Nightmare (Y) is my favourite Babymetal (X) song now"

Then the sentence in Japanese would be:
今、Rondo of Nightmareが一番大好きなBabymetal(ベービーメタル)の歌です。

A couple of notes on this:
- The おれ is not required. And if you really wanted to include it, it would be 今、おれはRondo of Nightmareが~
- It's "ichiban", not just "ichi"
- Both 歌 and 唄 mean the same thing. I just happen to prefer the former :)

Hope that helps.

Re: 雑談 (General Discussion)

Posted: 2014-11-16, 17:57
by Koko
どうも。Yes, it helps a lot (^-^).