LESSONS: Pronunciation, Stress etc

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Jonne
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LESSONS: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Jonne » 2005-10-04, 14:32

This might help if someone doesn't know the pronunciation enough good yet.

A - as british a in father.
B - no problems with it..
C - s or k
D - no problems with it..
E - like english e in bet or vet.
F - no problems with it..
G - no problems with it..
H - like english h. in the end of a syllable/before a consonant a bit harder.
I - like english i in sit.
J - like english y in yes.
K - no problems with it..
L - like english l in clean or less.
M - no problems with it..
N - no problems with it..
NK - like english nk in think.
NG - like english ng in sing.
NP - mp
NM - mm
O - somewhat similar to english a in all.
P - no problems with it..
Q - no problems with it..
R - very rrrolling rrr..
S - no problems with it..
T - your tongue touches your upper teeth.
U - like english u in boot but shorter
V - no problems with it..
W - no problems with it..
X - ks
Y - like german ü or french u.
Z - ts or z or s.
Å - same as o
Ä - like english a in cat or bag.
Ö - like french eu.

The full alphabet:
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z å ä ö

Long vowels & Double consonants
Long vowels are easy, just say the vowel but longer..
same with double consonants. The thing is that you have to be very careful with this. Always pronounce double consonants and long vowels.
Annan kissa = Anna's cat
Annan kissaa = I'm giving a cat

Tapaan sinut huomenna = I'll meet you tomorrow.
Tapan sinut huomenna = I'll kill you tomorrow.

Diphthongs
there are several in finnish;
ai, ei, oi, ui, yi, äi, öi, au, eu, iu, ou, äy, öy, ie, uo, ey, yö.

this doesn't affect the pronounciation of the word, because every letter stands for an independent sound. So "eu" is "e+u" , not anything like ö.

Stress
Stress is always on the first syllable.
Auto - Áuto
Lahti - Láhti
Raivo - Ráivo

with compounds, the second word gets a secondary stress.

sadetakki - sádetákki
rautatieasema - ráutatieásema


Note that when a word ends with an unwritten glottal stop, and you're going to attach a word or suffix to it, the second word/suffix starts with a double consonant. *sorry for a bad explanation. Can't explain this in English :oops: ideas?*

Sadetakki [sadettakki]

etc.
Last edited by Jonne on 2005-10-15, 20:56, edited 2 times in total.

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Varislintu
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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Varislintu » 2005-10-04, 16:38

Jonne wrote:NOTE that when the first word of a compound ends with a vowel, and the second starts with a consonant, the consonant is doubled.. but not written as a double consonant.
so "sadetakki" is actually pronounced as "sadettakki".


That's not true!

Raivotauti
Autotalli
Jalkakylpy
Menolippu

None of these are pronounced with a double consonant.

The rule about when there is an unwritten glottal stop (or whatever it is called) doesn't depend on wether the word is compounded or not.

Just think of the difference between these two words "ilmaistakaan":

En osaa ilmaistakaan (=I can't even express).
Se ei ole ilmaistakaan (=It's not free of charge, either).

One has a glottal stop before -kaan, the other doesn't. I've been wanting to write an article about these rules for months, but I haven't been able to find the rules written anywhere in the web :(. And I can't really think of the rules myself (even if I'm a native ;)).
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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Jonne » 2005-10-04, 16:45

Varislintu wrote:
Jonne wrote:NOTE that when the first word of a compound ends with a vowel, and the second starts with a consonant, the consonant is doubled.. but not written as a double consonant.
so "sadetakki" is actually pronounced as "sadettakki".


That's not true!

Raivotauti
Autotalli
Jalkakylpy
Menolippu

None of these are pronounced with a double consonant.

The rule about when there is an unwritten glottal stop (or whatever it is called) doesn't depend on wether the word is compounded or not.

Just think of the difference between these two words "ilmaistakaan":

En osaa ilmaistakaan (=I can't even express).
Se ei ole ilmaistakaan (=It's not free of charge, either).

One has a glottal stop before -kaan, the other doesn't. I've been wanting to write an article about these rules for months, but I haven't been able to find the rules written anywhere in the web :(. And I can't really think of the rules myself (even if I'm a native ;)).


Believe me, I took this from a book :shock:
Let's change it.

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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Varislintu » 2005-10-04, 17:20

Jonne wrote:Believe me, I took this from a book :shock:
Let's change it.


:shock: Please tell me the book isn't written by Finns at least?

Yeah, good that you changed it :). This glottal stop thingy is one annoying bugger; there doesn't seem to be any good info about it anywhere. I wonder if courses in Finnish usually even mention it..?

The wikipedia had a little mention about glottal stops in different languages, but their examples for Finnish were totally inadequate; the pause between vowels in "linja-auto" and one before the first a in "veronalainen". Useless stuff :roll: ;).
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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Jonne » 2005-10-04, 19:32

Varislintu wrote:
Jonne wrote:Believe me, I took this from a book :shock:
Let's change it.


:shock: Please tell me the book isn't written by Finns at least?

Yeah, good that you changed it :). This glottal stop thingy is one annoying bugger; there doesn't seem to be any good info about it anywhere. I wonder if courses in Finnish usually even mention it..?

The wikipedia had a little mention about glottal stops in different languages, but their examples for Finnish were totally inadequate; the pause between vowels in "linja-auto" and one before the first a in "veronalainen". Useless stuff :roll: ;).


I borrowed this book from library. It was very old one (a bit similar to colloquial series.. if you know them)

This glottal stop, I've never actually heard of it before :P I wonder how they learn these sadetakki and veronalainen pronunciations.. word-by-word maybe?

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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Varislintu » 2005-10-04, 21:51

Jonne wrote:I borrowed this book from library. It was very old one (a bit similar to colloquial series.. if you know them)

This glottal stop, I've never actually heard of it before :P I wonder how they learn these sadetakki and veronalainen pronunciations.. word-by-word maybe?


I wonder, too... :?:

And I don't remember these glottal stops ever being mentioned in school. But they are quite a major factor in Finnish pronounciation. Here's my mututuntuma (=unprofessional ;))list of "rules":

(Asterisk * symbolises a stop.)

1. The stop seems to affect mostly words ending in e and a. (Like "kone*".)

2. Imperative, that is, commands, always (?) end in a stop. (Like "mene*!" or "ota*!".)

3. The infinitive of verbs have it, thus making it sound like the first consonant of the suffix is double, even if it isn't. (Like "ilmaista*kaan" or "juoda*pa".)
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Re: Pronunciation, Stress etc

Postby Liisi » 2005-10-15, 10:26

Jonne wrote:NL - ll


Olen yrittänyt keksiä suomen kielen sanoja, joissa olisi yhdistelmä nl. Ainoa tulokseni oli nimi Venla, ja sekin äännetään niin kuin kirjoitetaan. Kertoisitko mitä sinulla oli mielessä, että saan unta ensi yönä? ;)

I've been trying to think of Finnish words that have the combination nl. My only result was the name Venla, and even that is pronounced as written. Please tell me what you had in mind, so that I can get some sleep tonight. ;)
I appreciate corrections to my mistakes in any language.

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Postby Jonne » 2005-10-15, 13:03

consonant pairs nl and nm assimilate to ll and mm
samanlainen -> samallainen
tavanmukainen -> tavammukainen

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Postby Varislintu » 2005-10-15, 13:35

Jonne wrote:consonant pairs nl and nm assimilate to ll and mm
samanlainen -> samallainen
tavanmukainen -> tavammukainen


But this is not an "official" rule. It depends on the individual and their dialect. I usually don't say "samallainen".

So maybe you could add in a side note or something that this (nl-->ll) isn't obligatory :)?
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Postby Liisi » 2005-10-15, 19:09

Varislintu wrote:
Jonne wrote:consonant pairs nl and nm assimilate to ll and mm
samanlainen -> samallainen
tavanmukainen -> tavammukainen


But this is not an "official" rule. It depends on the individual and their dialect. I usually don't say "samallainen".


I think I don't either. In my speech it's more like [samanlaine]. And remember Venla, that's not [Vella] ;).
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Postby Jonne » 2005-10-15, 20:55

You're both right :roll:
I say them as
samallaine
tavammukane


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