Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

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kisu
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Re: Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

Postby kisu » 2020-02-13, 11:05

Hyvää päivää everyone! :D

Unnettomuus = uni + onnettomuus?! (= sleep breakdown)

(If you know nice Suomi ethymological dictionary please give me a link! Or i would ask stupid things here for eternity :D)

Linguaphile
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Re: Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-02-13, 14:13

kisu wrote:Hyvää päivää everyone! :D

Unnettomuus = uni + onnettomuus?! (= sleep breakdown)

(If you know nice Suomi ethymological dictionary please give me a link! Or i would ask stupid things here for eternity :D)


Unettomuus = uni + ton +‎ uus ( = sleep + without + noun-forming suffix)

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sa wulfs
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Re: Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

Postby sa wulfs » 2020-03-20, 11:15

What's the most natural way to do third-person anaphoric reference with different referents in Finnish? For example, in English "she[person 1] said that she[p2] will come". I've read that in the spoken language this can be "Se[p1] sanoi, et hän[p2] tulee". How would the formal language handle this? In case of ambiguity (like in the English example), what are the most natural ways to resolve it in Finnish?
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Naava
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Re: Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

Postby Naava » 2020-03-21, 19:39

sa wulfs wrote:I've read that in the spoken language this can be "Se[p1] sanoi, et hän[p2] tulee".

It's actually the other way around:
"Se[p1] sanoi et hän[p1] tulee."

Hän indicates that this is a direct quote.

"Se sanoi et se tulee" can be either P1 & P1[indirect quote] or P1 & P2.

How would the formal language handle this? In case of ambiguity (like in the English example), what are the most natural ways to resolve it in Finnish?

I'd do the same as in spoken language: if the context is not enough to make it clear who we are talking about, I'd use names. For example, if P1 = Pekka and P2 = Anna:

1) We've been talking about Pekka.
> Hän sanoi, että Anna tulee.
He said that Anna is coming.

2) We've been talking about Anna.
> Pekka sanoi, että hän tulee.
Pekka said that she's coming.

3) In order to avoid any ambiguity:

> Pekka sanoi, että Anna tulee.
Pekka said that Anna's coming.

However, once you've mentioned two people, standard Finnish has a way to distinguish between P1 and P2 in the following sentence(s). I'm really bad at coming up with examples on my own so I'll copy this from here:

> Äiti[P1] lauloi lapselle[P2] unilaulua, ja lopulta tämä[P2] nukahti.
> Äiti[P1] lauloi lapselle[P2] unilaulua, ja lopulta hän[P1] nukahti.

(Mother sang a lullaby to a baby, and eventually she/the baby fell asleep.)

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sa wulfs
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Re: Questions about Finnish / Kysymyksiä suomen kielestä

Postby sa wulfs » 2020-03-23, 11:26

Thank you, Naava! That was a great explanation :)
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