Some phrases I struggle to translate by myself

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wolverine
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Some phrases I struggle to translate by myself

Postby wolverine » 2020-02-12, 20:27

I want to know some phrases in Russian and I'm having a hard time translating them myself - Google takes them literally and mangles them

"to break character"

"to break immersion"

"to suspend disbelief"

Context: me and a few people were talking about an opera singer botching a scene and breaking the mental immersion we'd gotten ourselves into.
'You're so cold, but you feel alive
Lay your hands on me, one last time'
- Breaking Benjamin

Fruchtenstein
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Re: Some phrases I struggle to translate by myself

Postby Fruchtenstein » 2020-02-13, 6:58

You've just taught me some English. The first two phrases I've never heard before, and I can't even imagine how to translate the second one.

"To break character" — "выйти из роли", "выйти из образа". E.g.: "Увидев слезы на ее глазах, он потерял концентрацию и на минуту вышел из роли злодея" Often used in positive context when an actor breaks the expected rules and interprets the character in a new way. If you would like to stress that it happened unwillingly, you can say "выпасть из роли, из образа". Another word is "расколоться". It's a colloquial expression, analogous to the English theatrical slang "to corpse".

"To suspend disbelief" — Russian Wikepedia includes an article called 'Приостановка недоверия'. I never heard this expression before and it looks really awkward, but the article mentions some alternative expressions used in literature. For example, the translation of Coleridge's Biographia Literaria, where this expression was used for the first time, speaks about "временный отказ от недоверия". In my opinion, a better translation would be "подавить недоверие" or "подавить сомнения". One might also use a figurative expression "закрыть глаза на что-либо".

I'll take a break to find a suitable translation for the second phrase.
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Fruchtenstein
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Re: Some phrases I struggle to translate by myself

Postby Fruchtenstein » 2020-02-13, 9:46

@wolverine, is this second phrase used in the specific context of the 'immersive theatre'?
Native: Russian Fluent: Am.English Learning: French, Latin
Book reviews in Russian
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wolverine
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Re: Some phrases I struggle to translate by myself

Postby wolverine » 2020-02-13, 17:05

Fruchtenstein wrote:@wolverine, is this second phrase used in the specific context of the 'immersive theatre'?


First, big thanks for the help, second, no, myself and a friend were talking about an opera singer messing up a scene. He was supposed to garrotte his victim but he was clearly really uncomfortable about it and didn't want to even mime being violent to someone, and the result was a 'loss of immersion' feeling because he really wasn't acting like Orlik.

Edit: Wait, I misunderstood, I assumed you meant specifically theatre rather than any performing art, but I hadn't had enough caffeine at the time...yes, pretty much that. We were talking about how we'd suspended disbelief but then got jolted out of it because "Orlik" was really not acting like Orlik.
'You're so cold, but you feel alive
Lay your hands on me, one last time'
- Breaking Benjamin


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