Russian discussion group.

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kubik
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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby kubik » 2017-12-19, 16:21

vijayjohn wrote:Я хочу написать что-нибудь* здесь, но я не знаю, что написать.

В Рэддите, каждую неделю есть подсказки для написания сочинений** на русском языке. Подсказки*** достаточно трудные. Часто я не знаю, что я бы ответил, даже если бы подсказка была по-английски!
* Слово "что-то" подразумевает, что говорящий знает, что он имеет в виду, когда он говорит "что-то". "Что-то" - это как бы "something" с определённым артиклем.
** "Подсказки для написания сочинений" звучит, как будто речь идёт о "writing tips", а не "writing prompts". Наверное, можно сказать "каждую неделю предлагают темы для сочинений" или "каждую неделю предлагают написать сочинение на определённую тему", но это тоже не совсем про "writing prompts". Хм. :hmm:
*** Тире между подлежащим и сказуемым ставится, если они оба выражены инфинитивами или существительными в именительном падеже или одно выражено инфинитивом, а другое существительным в именительном падеже. В данном случае слово "трудные" - сказуемое, выраженное прилагательным.


Ты можешь привести пример темы, на которую в Reddit-е предлагают написать сочинение? Мне интересно. :)

vijayjohn
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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-27, 21:32

kubik wrote:Ты можешь привести пример темы, на которую в Reddit-е предлагают написать сочинение? Мне интересно. :)

Да, вот пример ))

И спасибо большое!

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby AlanF_US » 2018-02-22, 14:00

I'm having trouble with the last line in this excerpt from Кошкин Дом:

Коза (козлу тихо):
Слушай, дурень, перестань
Есть хозяйскую герань!

Козёл (тихо):
Ты попробуй. Очень вкусно.
Точно лист жуёшь капустный.


I understand that it means something like this:

Точно как капустный лист жуёшь.

I also understand that word order is more free in Russian than in English. What I don't understand is how the syntax in the original can be that free. Specifically, I have trouble seeing how a conjugated adjective (as opposed to an unconjugated adverb-like adjective) can be so far away from the noun. Is it common for an adjective to be neither immediately before nor immediately after a noun?

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby voron » 2018-02-22, 15:27

AlanF_US wrote: Is it common for an adjective to be neither immediately before nor immediately after a noun?

It's common in poetry.

Specifically, I have trouble seeing how a conjugated adjective (as opposed to an unconjugated adverb-like adjective) can be so far away from the noun.

Actually, it being conjugated simplifies seeing the connection between the adjective and the noun it modifies (since they are both in the same case), thus giving more freedom to separate them.

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby linguoboy » 2018-03-03, 3:12

This question comes from my brother, whom I sent a birthday card to in Russian. One of the lines is: "Пусть будешь ты счастливей всех!" and he wants to know why the adjective appears to be in the feminine form given that the front of the card says "Моему брату"
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby voron » 2018-03-03, 12:44

linguoboy wrote:This question comes from my brother, whom I sent a birthday card to in Russian. One of the lines is: "Пусть будешь ты счастливей всех!" and he wants to know why the adjective appears to be in the feminine form given that the front of the card says "Моему брату"


It literally means "Let you be happier than all", and the adjective is in the comparative form (which doesn't distinguish gender).

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Lutrinae » 2018-05-21, 21:40

Hey :)

I am not sure if that post belongs here, feel free to let me know if not!

So I just started to learn russian and I went first with the alphabet, and decided to learn both block and cursive, so now that I start to get it I am training by writing down the words learnt in the lesson.

Since it's kind of different from the block letters and that some are similar to the latin alphabet but not quite, I would like to get some opinion if it seems correct or if there's some changes needed? (especially the size of the letters, they seem really small on the templates I've seen!)

20180521_222422.jpg
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Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby plengfruit » 2018-05-21, 22:39

I'm can't really add anything constructive here, but I like the way you write П :whistle:
Image Image Image Image Image

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Lutrinae » 2018-05-23, 22:08

plengfruit wrote:I'm can't really add anything constructive here, but I like the way you write П :whistle:


Haha ok then, I'll post more, whenever I learn new words with capital П ^^

So yesterday I was reading articles about words existing only in specific languages, and one of them was :

Russian - Razbliuto - the sentimental feeling you have about someone you once loved but no longer do.

Then after some more research and seeing that this was widely spread on Internet, I found one article from a Russian person, stating and explaining that this word never existed in Russian, although it as been referred to in some books !

I was so happy I read that before using it to show off to my Russian colleagues XD

Did you know about this word, his fakness or did you encounter some similar examples ?

Article

Edited to add cursive attempt at my favourite part of the article :

20180523_233030.jpg


I am having some troubles with small г, trying to make it not look too much like a п in the middle of words.
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Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Lutrinae » 2018-05-27, 19:42

привет :)

I have a question about the word “Нука“.

In the lesson, it's part of the expression “Нука давай.“

Erik:
Давай покушаем вместе?
Anna:
Нука давай.


So, in this context, the whole expression is “let's do that“.

But what is it on its own ? Is it like an imperative form ?
Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Serge » 2018-06-13, 9:43

"Ну" is very frequently used function word of Russian. ( "- кa" is an amplifying particle after pronouns, adverbs and imperatives, informing the speakers of a familiarity; requires accelerated execution of a request or order). It has so many meanings :shock: I think, in many cases, it can be translated by a word "well"...Here in detail (in Russian) https://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/dmitriev/2900/%D0%BD%D1%83

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Serge » 2018-06-13, 10:12

This word ( разблюто ) does not exist in Russian. As for the small "r" ... or write it with a longer "tail," or just write like "p" - this is a very common variant and it is often used.

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Naava » 2018-06-13, 10:46

Lutrinae wrote:Edited to add cursive attempt at my favourite part of the article

I'm not a native speaker nor have I ever lived in Russia (or any other country that uses Cyrillic alphabet), so I can't say anything for sure - but I can tell you what's different from how I've been taught to write.

I noticed that your л is lacking the initial "hook" - like this, the first highlighted letter. (The same hook should be in м and я.) The loop in ц was rather big, I'm used to seeing it less than ½ the size of loops in у and д. Like this. But I don't know how natives write, these are just the "perfect" examples I've been taught to use. :P

I've been also told that you can add a straight line above т and under ш if you want to distinguish them more easily, but I think that's optional because it's rare to see that in "teach yourself Cyrillic handwriting" examples. And I noticed my Russian friend does д sometimes like this and this, so I think that's an option, too. :D

I don't know how much my opinion counts here, but I must say you have a cute and readable handwriting! Sometimes I wish I could write like that too. :ohwell:

Lutrinae wrote:I am having some troubles with small г, trying to make it not look too much like a п in the middle of words.

You have a round handwriting (which, imo, looks nice) and that's probably why you're afraid your г and п might look too similar. I tend to write п like here, so it has that initial small "hook" and straight line down, which г doesn't have. I don't know how that'd work in your style, though. :hmm: I guess you just need to test out what works for you.

Meanwhile, I'm really struggling with б. No matter how I do it, it looks like a tadpole: round o with a weird tail. :lol:

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby Lutrinae » 2018-06-13, 20:35

Serge wrote:"Ну" is very frequently used function word of Russian. ( "- кa" is an amplifying particle after pronouns, adverbs and imperatives, informing the speakers of a familiarity; requires accelerated execution of a request or order). It has so many meanings :shock: I think, in many cases, it can be translated by a word "well"...Here in detail (in Russian) https://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/dmitriev/2900/%D0%BD%D1%83


Thanks for the link and info :)

Serge wrote:This word ( разблюто ) does not exist in Russian. As for the small "r" ... or write it with a longer "tail," or just write like "p" - this is a very common variant and it is often used.


Then you distinguish them just by knowing the words, right ?

Naava wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:Edited to add cursive attempt at my favourite part of the article

I'm not a native speaker nor have I ever lived in Russia (or any other country that uses Cyrillic alphabet), so I can't say anything for sure - but I can tell you what's different from how I've been taught to write.

I noticed that your л is lacking the initial "hook" - like this, the first highlighted letter. (The same hook should be in м and я.) The loop in ц was rather big, I'm used to seeing it less than ½ the size of loops in у and д. Like this. But I don't know how natives write, these are just the "perfect" examples I've been taught to use. :P


It's true, I've seen this small hook later on when I searched for cursive writing examples !

Naava wrote:I've been also told that you can add a straight line above т and under ш if you want to distinguish them more easily, but I think that's optional because it's rare to see that in "teach yourself Cyrillic handwriting" examples. And I noticed my Russian friend does д sometimes like this and this, so I think that's an option, too. :D


I do the straight line in my notes sometimes, not to get confused, and in another color just to make sure :lol:

Naava wrote:I don't know how much my opinion counts here, but I must say you have a cute and readable handwriting! Sometimes I wish I could write like that too. :ohwell:

Lutrinae wrote:I am having some troubles with small г, trying to make it not look too much like a п in the middle of words.

You have a round handwriting (which, imo, looks nice) and that's probably why you're afraid your г and п might look too similar. I tend to write п like here, so it has that initial small "hook" and straight line down, which г doesn't have. I don't know how that'd work in your style, though. :hmm: I guess you just need to test out what works for you.

Meanwhile, I'm really struggling with б. No matter how I do it, it looks like a tadpole: round o with a weird tail. :lol:


Yes I will continue training ! It's really difficult to make б looking like something, really, I understand the struggle.
I've seen some cursive pages that were so beautiful !
Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Russian discussion group.

Postby voron » 2018-06-15, 16:29

Lutrinae wrote:Russian - Razbliuto - the sentimental feeling you have about someone you once loved but no longer do.

Razbliuto is definitely not a word, as everyone else confirmed.

Just recently I was listening to this German song Herzblut (du hast mein Herzblut), and I noticed how the blut part is similar to razbluito. Perhaps it's formed by contamination from German?


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