vijayjohn - русский

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vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2014-11-07, 7:59

Здесь я могу упоминать все ошибки, которые я уже делал в этом форуме. Если есть стрелка около фразы, это значит, что я уже постарался её правильно написать.

-> так что извините

-> есть ошибки (не *есть ошибок)

-> по-английски (не *по-английскому)

говорит на другом славянском языке (не *другой славянский язык)

Я не знаю, но я думаю (не *...а я думаю)

будут (к тому времени уже) мертвы (не *мёртвые)

-> говорит только по-русски (!= только говорит по-русски)

-> говорит только на двух языках (не *...двa языкa)

-> большинство дальтоников (вместо ?больше всего дальтоников)

-> Я справился с переводом той фразы (не *правлялся переводить ту фразу)

Будем надеяться (не *будем просто надеяться)

я её правильно перевел (не *...переводил)

я знаю немного поговорок/пословиц или я только/совсем немного знаю поговорки/пословицы (не ?я только немного знаю поговорок/пословиц)

-> Без труда не вынешь рыбку из пруда = You can't catch fish from a pond without work.

Больше нет/Уже нет (не *Не больше)

это вид животного (не только *вид животного)
когда они собираются (не *когда собираются)

рождающийся = (is) born (не родившийся)

умирающий, когда они расходятся (не *умирающий когда отправляются)

знает название хотя бы одной предыдущей ССР кроме России(?) (не *знает имя хотя бы одной предыдущей ССР кроме Росии)
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2015-08-10, 1:07, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby voron » 2014-11-07, 9:28

vijayjohn wrote:рождающийся (не *родившийся)

Both exist,
рождающийся is the present participle form.
родившийся is the past participle form.

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2014-11-07, 20:06

Thanks! Fixed. :)

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-03-03, 19:08

Я тоже (не *И я?)

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby LifeDeath » 2016-03-04, 17:42

Both are possible. But I suppose the first one is better, it is more distinct.

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-03-04, 18:44

Oh OK, thanks!

And I have another mistake to add here (punctuation this time):

..., чтобы

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby LifeDeath » 2016-03-05, 8:15

Yes. Чтобы is a conjunction that is used in complex sentences with a dependent clause of purpose. It is used with a comma.
"I study math, чтобы be clever when I grow older". - Я учу математику, чтобы быть умным когда вырасту.
"I tried to overhear it, чтобы know what he wants to do". - Я пытался подслушать это, чтобы знать что он хочет сделать.

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-26, 7:55

Спасибо, LifeDeath! :)

путь (не *пут)

Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу...

Если ты хочешь

Если ему никто не скажет в ближайшее время (не *Если никто не скоро его скажет)

Ничего страшного = ничего, ничего

Эта фраза короткая (не *Эта фраза — кратка)

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby LifeDeath » 2017-02-28, 17:51

vijayjohn wrote:путь (не *пут)

Obviously, if you mean "way" or "path". "Пут" is something different.

vijayjohn wrote:Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу...

It looked strange at the first sight, but the more I try to make examples with it, the more natural it begins to sound. But I think I would expect "или нет" (or not) after this in the end of the sentence. "Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу или нет". Like in English "I don't know, whether I understand the phrase or not". (I kept the comma at its position).
I don't say it would be incorrect to finish it somehow differently, but it would sound less idiomatic, at least to me.

vijayjohn wrote:Если ты хочешь

Yes, pretty good and idiomatic "If you want".

vijayjohn wrote:Если ему никто не скажет в ближайшее время (не *Если никто не скоро его скажет)

I would shift the adverbial "в ближайшее время" back: "Если в ближайшее время ему никто не скажет, ..."
But I just think it's a matter of a style or habit. So I think your sentence is a good one, too, especially in a fluent casual speech.

vijayjohn wrote:Ничего страшного = ничего, ничего

They can be similar but it depends on your intonation. I think you know this since you wrote those expressions. The latter means something like "It's okay, it's alright" and you just say it to someone who accidentally did something unpleasant to you, and you don't want a quarrel, but reassure him.

vijayjohn wrote:Эта фраза короткая

I, again, would rephrase to "Это короткая фраза" cause it sounds more natural like that. Note that "эта" becomes "это" here.
If you keep "эта", the sentence would have a different meaning. It would have a kind of exclaiming connotation, like you're pointing out at something, usually with regret.
"Ах, эта короткая фраза! Я никогда ее не понимал!"
"Oh, this short prase! I've never understood it!".

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-22, 23:24

(to speak/write) properly = должным образом (говорить/писать; не "говорить/писать правильно")

не могут даже должным образом ни говорить, ни писать (не *даже не говорят ни пишут правильно)

ни говорить, ни писать на своём единственном национальном языке (не *говорят ни пишут правильно свой единственный национальный язык)

У следующего человека есть... (не *У следующему человеку)
LifeDeath wrote:Obviously, if you mean "way" or "path".

Yes, I did. I used it in the word association game after the last person wrote путешествие. I wrote пут when I really meant путь.

Thanks! :)
vijayjohn wrote:Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу...

It looked strange at the first sight, but the more I try to make examples with it, the more natural it begins to sound. But I think I would expect "или нет" (or not) after this in the end of the sentence. "Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу или нет". Like in English "I don't know, whether I understand the phrase or not". (I kept the comma at its position).
I don't say it would be incorrect to finish it somehow differently, but it would sound less idiomatic, at least to me.

What about "Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу по-английски"?

Also, how would you say 'I'm not sure I understood the sentence in English'? (For example, how would you say that if someone asked you in English, 'How do you translate this sentence into Russian?' but you didn't even understand the sentence they gave you?).
I would shift the adverbial "в ближайшее время" back: "Если в ближайшее время ему никто не скажет, ..."
But I just think it's a matter of a style or habit. So I think your sentence is a good one, too, especially in a fluent casual speech.

Okay, thanks again, that's very good to know! kuЫК had suggested Если ему никто не скажет в ближайшее время instead of Если никто не скоро его скажет.
vijayjohn wrote:Ничего страшного = ничего, ничего

They can be similar but it depends on your intonation. I think you know this since you wrote those expressions. The latter means something like "It's okay, it's alright" and you just say it to someone who accidentally did something unpleasant to you, and you don't want a quarrel, but reassure him.

Oh, okay, thanks!
vijayjohn wrote:Эта фраза короткая

I, again, would rephrase to "Это короткая фраза" cause it sounds more natural like that. Note that "эта" becomes "это" here.
If you keep "эта", the sentence would have a different meaning. It would have a kind of exclaiming connotation, like you're pointing out at something, usually with regret.
"Ах, эта короткая фраза! Я никогда ее не понимал!"
"Oh, this short prase! I've never understood it!".

Well, the full sentence I originally wrote was Эта фраза — кратка и простая in the translation thread when I was trying to translate the sentence 'this sentence is short and simple'. Then kuЫК suggested instead that I should say, "Эта фраза короткая и простая." Do you think it would be better to say, "Эта короткая и простая фраза"?

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Re: vijayjohn - русский

Postby LifeDeath » 2017-10-06, 16:55

vijayjohn wrote:What about "Я не знаю, понимаю ли я фразу по-английски"?

Also, how would you say 'I'm not sure I understood the sentence in English'? (For example, how would you say that if someone asked you in English, 'How do you translate this sentence into Russian?' but you didn't even understand the sentence they gave you?).

This is how people say it, but I'm not sure if that's grammatical according to some linguistic standards. Because you either understand something or not. How can you understand something "in English" or any other language?
But, as I said, I wouldn't be surprised did I hear something like that in a casual conversation.
As for me, I would say "Не знаю, понял ли я эту фразу или нет". (I don't know whether I understood this sentence or not).
Or "Я не расслышал что он сказал на английском" (I didn't hear (catch) what he said in English).
I think that the first example is strange, you either understood or not. How can you doubt about it? How can you not be sure? I think that "English" can be omitted, because the guy you're talking with probably understands what language you mean when you say it.

vijayjohn wrote:Okay, thanks again, that's very good to know! kuЫК had suggested Если ему никто не скажет в ближайшее время instead of Если никто не скоро его скажет.

"Если никто не скоро его скажет" is incorrect. It means something like "If he is not said by someone not soon" which is highly unnatural in English, too.
This is because of Russian cases:
"Его скажет" is the accusative case, so it means something like "Say him / talk him", it's like "he" is an object of talking. (And we do not say like that in Russian).
"Ему скажет" is the dative case. It means "Say to him / tell him" and I think this is what's supposed to be meant.
Yes, "Если ему никто не скажет в ближайшее время" is also pretty natural.

vijayjohn wrote:Well, the full sentence I originally wrote was Эта фраза — кратка и простая in the translation thread when I was trying to translate the sentence 'this sentence is short and simple'. Then kuЫК suggested instead that I should say, "Эта фраза короткая и простая." Do you think it would be better to say, "Эта короткая и простая фраза"?

Again, it should be "Это" in your example.
I would put adjectives before the noun they modify: "Это короткая и простая фраза". But I think it probably depends on style.
But you can't use short adjectives like that! You have to shift them further so that they are placed after the noun: "Эта фраза кратка и проста".
I also think that using both short and full adjectives in a sentence modifying one noun isn't a good idea. At least it sounds strange. So your sentence "Эта фраза — кратка и простая". should either be rephrased to "Эта фразакратка и проста" or "Эта фраза — короткая и простая". (But the latter is a bit strange with the dash. Better "Эта фраза короткая и простая").

Well, the whole issue is complicated. Short adjectives is usually used to produce some kind of effect of sounding somewhat archaic. But many of them have become independent words and their meanings is a bit (sometimes a lot) different from the meaning of their full forms.

But the difference between "короткий", "краткий" и "краток" might be absolutely confusing.
Короткий - means "short". The short form is "короток".
Краткий - means "brief". The short form is "краток" ("кратка" for feminine).
In Russian "brief" is colloquially used to mean "short". While in English they are completely different.
I recommend that you read about it in the internet, here, for example.
Or here, here and here.


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