Português [Europeu] / Portuguese [European]

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Axystos
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-06, 22:56

Como escolhes as palavras para 'a palavra do dia'?

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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-06, 23:02

Escolho-as aleatoriamente ;)
O pa-integral diz que são demasiado fáceis... mas eu não sei...

I just choose them randomly ;)
pa-integral says they're too easy... but I don't know...
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Axystos
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-06, 23:30

Devo dizer que concordo com pa-integral. Palavras como 'agua' e 'peixo' já sei, más eu não sou o único no listo, verdade?

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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-06, 23:33

Não... há várias pessoas ;)

Vou tentar aumentar a dificuldade então... mas é melhor estudares essas palavras melhor: Água e Peixe, not agua e peixo ;)

What kind of words do you guys suggest? Give some English examples...
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-11-07, 0:55

Já pensaste em escolher um tema para cada semana, Luís? Numa semana, poderias limitar o vocabulário a animais... Na outra, a partes do corpo... E assim por diante.
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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-07, 10:06

Talvez... fosse boa ideia.
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-08, 19:28

Luís wrote:Vou tentar aumentar a dificuldade então... mas é melhor estudares essas palavras melhor: Água e Peixe, not agua e peixo ;)


:? Não prestei atenção.
Más sem embargo imediatamente reconheci "Água" e "Peixe" como 'water' e 'fish' em inglês.

:? I didn't pay attention.
But nevertheless I immediately recognized "Água" and "Peixe" as being 'water' and 'fish' in english.

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-11-08, 21:03

Axystos wrote::? Não prestei atenção.
Más sem embargo imediatamente reconheci "Água" e "Peixe" como 'water' e 'fish' em inglês.

That's okay, Axystos, but 'sem embargo' isn't really a common expression in Portuguese — I was even kind of surprised when I found it in the dictionary, because I thought it had been a direct translation from Spanish. :oops: Saying 'no entanto' would probably sound more natural here. It was okay, though, once again. :)

Oh, and a small point — 'mas', without the accent mark.
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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-08, 22:44

"Sem embargo" does exist, specially in formal language. But no ones uses that in daily life...
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-09, 20:20

I needed the word for 'nevertheless' and my dictionary gave 'sem embargo' and 'todavia'. I thought that 'todavia' was too spanish, so I chose 'sem embargo'.

Precisei da palavra por 'nevertheless' e o meu dicionário deu 'sem embargo' e 'todavia'. Pensei que 'todavia' foi espanhol demasiado, portanto escolhi 'sem embargo'.

And that's the story behind it. :)
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-09, 20:36

Todavia is not too Spanish.
Todavia in Portuguese doesn't mean the same as in Spanish. In Portuguese = however, in Spanish = still, yet
(from Latin "tota via")
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-09, 20:51

And could I have used it in my sentence?

E eu pude usar-lo na minha frase?

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Postby Luís » 2003-11-09, 21:43

Sim, podias :)
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Postby ekalin » 2003-11-10, 10:34

Yet "todavia" is still slightly too format. "No entanto", "Apesar disso" ou "Mesmo assim" would be more natural.
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Postby Starian » 2003-11-10, 22:54

Luís wrote:Todavia is not too Spanish.
Todavia in Portuguese doesn't mean the same as in Spanish. In Portuguese = however, in Spanish = still, yet
(from Latin "tota via")


According to my Dictionary:

Todavia (PT) = Though, But, Yet, Still.
Todavia (ES) = Still, Yet.
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-10, 23:01

Starian wrote:According to my Dictionary:

Todavia (PT) = Though, But, Yet, Still.
Todavia (ES) = Still, Yet.


True... but this might confuse people, because of the many meanings of "yet" and "still" in English.

It's a synonym for "yet" and "still" when they mean "ainda assim", "contudo", "no entanto" (basically "however"), but never when they simply mean "ainda". Saying "Todavia não o fiz" for "I haven't done it yet" would be simply wrong, while in Spanish that is precisely the primary meaning!
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Postby Axystos » 2003-11-30, 20:31

We won't receive the word-of-the-day anymore?

Já não receberemos a palavra-do-dia?

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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-11-30, 22:06

Oops... :oops:
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Postby Luís » 2003-12-05, 19:14

If you're interested in hearing spoken Portuguese + the cute Lúcia Moniz performing, you should watch a film called "Love Actually". I saw it on cinema 3 or 4 weeks ago and it was OK. Lúcia Moniz is a famous Portuguese singer/actress (some of you might have some of her mp3's like "Asas Na Mão") and she plays the role of a poor portuguese emigrant in France who works for a British guy and they fall in love, even though they can't speak each other's languages (she speaks in Portuguese, him in English). At the end, he ends up learning Portuguese in 7 days to propose to her and it's fun to see him speaking in broken Portuguese :)
Besides that nice part, I think the film is a bit insultuous for the portuguese people in the way they portrait it... it seems like it's set in 60's or something :? ... anyway... the Brazilian Rodrigo Santoro is also in the cast, but he speaks in English (does he speak? ok... he has 3 lines ;)... I guess the purpose of him being there is just to get him undressed, which happens at some point). If any of the Brazilians has seen this, I'd be very interested in knowing if Lúcia's lines come with subtitles :)
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Postby pa-integral » 2003-12-05, 20:36

Yes, there is an old singer man who is very funny too :) And her 'pai natal' girls too ;)


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