Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Moderator: Luís

User avatar
ujjain
Posts: 7
Joined: 2010-09-24, 22:20
Real Name: Dennis
Gender: male
Location: Rotterdam
Country: NL The Netherlands (Nederland)
Contact:

Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby ujjain » 2012-11-20, 8:17

I have been learning Brazilian Portuguese for almost 6 months. This week I have been practicing some Portuguese with people from Portugal. One of the differences is that in Portugal they use "tu" instead of "você".

This also means that "teu carro" is used instead of "seu carro". I wonder what would be his car in Portugal? Most websites have instructions of learning Portuguese are Brazilian Portuguese, so I decided to ask on the forums here.

Brazilian Portuguese
you have a car - você tem um carro.
your car - seu carro.
his car - o carro dele.

European Portuguese
you have a car - tu tens um carro.
your car - teu carro.
his car - ?

What is his car in European Portuguese? "Seu carro" means "o carro dele" or "o carro de você" in European Portuguese?

User avatar
Luís
Forum Administrator
Posts: 7709
Joined: 2002-07-12, 22:44
Location: Lisboa
Country: PT Portugal (Portugal)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Luís » 2012-11-20, 12:54

It would be the same, actually (o carro dele). You should note, though, that "seu carro" can also mean "his car" in both EP and BP, but it's more ambiguous and usually avoided.

Also, we do use "você" in EP, but it different contexts. We have a "Jij"/"U" distinction as in Dutch (with "você" being "U") while in Brazil they don't.
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8289
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Osias » 2012-11-20, 13:17

Brazilian Portuguese: where everything is more complex. I mean, we also say "teu carro". We even say "você trouxe teu carro" mixing both forms in the same sentence. If you want I can post some songs with examples.

Also we don't have T/V distinction, but have formal treatment words: "o senhor" and "a senhora" being the most commom.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Psi-Lord
Posts: 10087
Joined: 2002-08-18, 7:02
Real Name: Marcel Q.
Gender: male
Location: Cândido Mota
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Psi-Lord » 2012-11-20, 15:14

osias wrote:[…] we also say "teu carro". We even say "você trouxe teu carro" mixing both forms in the same sentence.

Although this might go off topic, I thought it was worse pointing that the situation isn’t totally unheard of in Portugal either. The difference, however, is that they mix the second person plural there – vós has been replaced by vocês (or other equivalent expressions) in most areas, but it’s not uncommon to hear e.g. ‘vocês trouxeram o vosso carro’, ‘abram os vossos livros’ etc. Right, Luís?

osias wrote:Also we don't have T/V distinction, but have formal treatment words: "o senhor" and "a senhora" being the most commom.

Probably also worth pointing those also exist in European Portuguese. Actually, this takes me back to the beginning of osias’s post:

osias wrote:Brazilian Portuguese: where everything is more complex.

Whenever I hear/read about the subtleties of addressing someone in Portugal, I believe things are actually far more complex there. There seem to be so many different layers of politeness, formality and distancing that it just feels extremely easy to offend and/or get offended by getting them wrong. :lol:
português do Brasil (pt-BR)British English (en-GB) galego (gl) português (pt) •• العربية (ar) български (bg) Cymraeg (cy) Deutsch (de)  r n km.t (egy) español rioplatense (es-AR) 日本語 (ja) 한국어 (ko) lingua Latina (la) ••• Esperanto (eo) (grc) français (fr) (hi) magyar (hu) italiano (it) polski (pl) Türkçe (tr) 普通話 (zh-CN)

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8289
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Osias » 2012-11-20, 21:17

Conclusion: everything is more complex with the Portuguese language
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Levike
Posts: 6153
Joined: 2013-04-22, 19:26
Real Name: Levi
Gender: male
Location: Budapest
Country: HU Hungary (Magyarország)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Levike » 2013-04-26, 21:23

Possessive pronouns in EU Portuguese:
- meu
- teu
- seu
- nosso
- vosso
- seu
Nem egy nap alatt épült Buda vára.

User avatar
mōdgethanc
Posts: 10658
Joined: 2010-03-20, 5:27
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby mōdgethanc » 2013-04-26, 21:30

I was taught to use the de clitics to avoid the ambiguity with seu, so: o carro dele (literally, the car of him).

User avatar
OldBoring
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5885
Joined: 2012-12-08, 7:19
Real Name: Francesco
Gender: male
Location: Milan
Country: IT Italy (Italia)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby OldBoring » 2013-06-15, 8:37

Because of the ambiguity I never use "seu".
I use:

meu
teu
dele
nosso / da gente
vosso* / de vocês
deles

*vosso is in disuse in Brazil.

Seu only used in formal sentences, where it's clear from the context that it means his. E.g. Ele lava o seu carro cada semana.

Joke
Um policial sempre sai da delegacia desde 11h até 1h. O comandante vira suspeitoso, chama o seu policial mais fiel e o manda de espionar o outro durante aquelas horas.
Cinco dias depois o policial «espião» reporta ao comandante:
«Ele sai da delegacia, dirige o seu carro, vai na sua casa, vai no seu banheiro, vai na sua cama e faz amor con a sua mulher.»
E o comandante responde: «E então, que tem de mau?!».
O outro diz: «Desculpa, posso tratar o senhor com o tu?».
«Sim, pode.»
«Então ele sai da delegacia, dirige o "teu" carro, vai na "tua" casa, vai no "teu" banheiro, vai na "tua" cama, e faz amor com a "tua" mulher!»


Translated from Italian, but this joke also works in Portuguese.

User avatar
Luís
Forum Administrator
Posts: 7709
Joined: 2002-07-12, 22:44
Location: Lisboa
Country: PT Portugal (Portugal)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Luís » 2013-06-15, 11:16

I think I've heard that joke in Portuguese before. :)

Whenever I receive a Facebook notification saying "X comentou o seu estado/a sua foto" I always have to think for a split second "Is that his/her status or mine?" :lol:
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

User avatar
Psi-Lord
Posts: 10087
Joined: 2002-08-18, 7:02
Real Name: Marcel Q.
Gender: male
Location: Cândido Mota
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Psi-Lord » 2013-06-16, 1:29

Luís wrote:Whenever I receive a Facebook notification saying "X comentou o seu estado/a sua foto" I always have to think for a split second "Is that his/her status or mine?" :lol:

Idem. :lol:
português do Brasil (pt-BR)British English (en-GB) galego (gl) português (pt) •• العربية (ar) български (bg) Cymraeg (cy) Deutsch (de)  r n km.t (egy) español rioplatense (es-AR) 日本語 (ja) 한국어 (ko) lingua Latina (la) ••• Esperanto (eo) (grc) français (fr) (hi) magyar (hu) italiano (it) polski (pl) Türkçe (tr) 普通話 (zh-CN)

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8289
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby Osias » 2013-06-17, 13:39

I use facebook in Catalan and have the same problem. Yes, I know.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
TeneReef
Posts: 3071
Joined: 2010-04-17, 23:22
Gender: male
Location: Kampor
Country: HR Croatia (Hrvatska)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby TeneReef » 2013-07-13, 17:35

विकृतिः एवम्‌ प्रकृति
learning in 2019: (no-nn)

User avatar
TeneReef
Posts: 3071
Joined: 2010-04-17, 23:22
Gender: male
Location: Kampor
Country: HR Croatia (Hrvatska)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby TeneReef » 2013-07-13, 17:38

hāozigǎnr wrote:Because of the ambiguity I never use "seu".
I use:

meu
teu
dele
nosso / da gente
vosso* / de vocês
deles

*vosso is in disuse in Brazil.

Seu only used in formal sentences, where it's clear from the context that it means his. E.g. Ele lava o seu carro cada semana.

Joke
Um policial sempre sai da delegacia desde 11h até 1h. O comandante vira suspeitoso, chama o seu policial mais fiel e o manda de espionar o outro durante aquelas horas.
Cinco dias depois o policial «espião» reporta ao comandante:
«Ele sai da delegacia, dirige o seu carro, vai na sua casa, vai no seu banheiro, vai na sua cama e faz amor con a sua mulher.»
E o comandante responde: «E então, que tem de mau?!».
O outro diz: «Desculpa, posso tratar o senhor com o tu?».
«Sim, pode.»
«Então ele sai da delegacia, dirige o "teu" carro, vai na "tua" casa, vai no "teu" banheiro, vai na "tua" cama, e faz amor com a "tua" mulher!»


Translated from Italian, but this joke also works in Portuguese.



Teu may sound too direct and even ''ugly'' in many parts of Brazil.
For example, in the city of Salvador, everyone uses seu and teu is not used much.
When I started learning Portuguese (many many years ago), I was corrected
by my Paulistano friends, they considered ''teu'' ugly and recommended that I use seu exclusively.
On the other hand, TE is universal in Brazil, no Brazilian would consider it too direct, or ''ugly'', it's basically the unstressed clitic of você (it shares that status with LHE in Bahia).

Acceptability of TU forms in ''neutral'' Brazilian Portuguese:

te > contigo > teu > ti > tu
(TU is the most regional-sounding, TE is de facto non-regional Brazilian Portuguese).

Mário Perini says in his ''Brazilian Portuguese (A Reference Grammar'':
seu is preferred, teu is occasionally heard
(his description is based on Belo Horizonte usage, his native city)

As for the city of Rio, people who use both tu and você use tu+teu or você+teu,
people who don't use tu at all, tend to stick with você+seu.

In neutral Brazilian Portuguese (not formal nor informal):
Você viaja muito.
O carro é seu.
Não vou fugir de você.
Vou viajar com você.
Vejo você.
Isso pertence a você.
Ligo p/você.

(These sound natural in speech, and are correct according to the official formal grammar of Brazilian Portuguese, so you won't lose points in an assessment essay).

Regional:
Salvador: você, seu, lhe/te (Eu te/lhe amo or Eu amo você), com você
Rio: as in SSA (but without LHE) or você/tu + teu, te, esperando você/tu passar, contigo/com tu/você
Recife: combined usage from SSA+RJ, vejo tu, um beijo pa tu is very common :mrgreen: some people use tu exclusively but use it with LHE :mrgreen:
Maranhão: tu, teu, ti, contigo, te/lhe (LHE has infested the tuteante speach of Maranhão because of forró music from Pernambuco and neighboring states)
it's very complex :para:

Salvador is the most você-ante city of Brazil (people use LHE informally and imperatives of você don't sound formal at all: diga aí/me siga etc...don't not sound formal at all), São Luís do Maranhão is the most tuteante city of Brazil. All other cities/regions of Brazil are between these two extremes (maybe MG and ES are closer to vocêante nature of Salvador than to tuteante nature of Rio or Santos). 5 years ago I analyzed a corpus of Salvador-made axé music lyrics and it was something like 90% seu+sua+seus+suas vs 10% teu+tua+teus+tuas. In MPB and bossa nova lyrics teu/tua is much more common because of Rio influence.

A quote from a carioca funk song (Me chamaram pra Orgia de Tati Quebra Barraco)
De tigrão tu não tem nada mais parece um gatinho se eu entrar na sua jaula o tigrão fica mansinho :mrgreen:
tu+seu :P
विकृतिः एवम्‌ प्रकृति
learning in 2019: (no-nn)

User avatar
TeneReef
Posts: 3071
Joined: 2010-04-17, 23:22
Gender: male
Location: Kampor
Country: HR Croatia (Hrvatska)

Re: Personal pronouns in Portuguese

Postby TeneReef » 2013-07-13, 18:26

hāozigǎnr wrote:Because of the ambiguity I never use "seu".
I use:

meu
teu
dele
nosso / da gente
vosso* / de vocês
deles

*vosso is in disuse in Brazil.

Seu only used in formal sentences, where it's clear from the context that it means his. E.g. Ele lava o seu carro cada semana.

Joke
Um policial sempre sai da delegacia desde 11h até 1h. O comandante vira suspeitoso, chama o seu policial mais fiel e o manda de espionar o outro durante aquelas horas.
Cinco dias depois o policial «espião» reporta ao comandante:
«Ele sai da delegacia, dirige o seu carro, vai na sua casa, vai no seu banheiro, vai na sua cama e faz amor con a sua mulher.»
E o comandante responde: «E então, que tem de mau?!».
O outro diz: «Desculpa, posso tratar o senhor com o tu?».
«Sim, pode.»
«Então ele sai da delegacia, dirige o "teu" carro, vai na "tua" casa, vai no "teu" banheiro, vai na "tua" cama, e faz amor com a "tua" mulher!»


Translated from Italian, but this joke also works in Portuguese.


As it's been said earlier, except in fixed phrases (Cada um na sua etc), in speech
seu/sua defaults to your(s), and not to his/her:

Vale lembrar a esse respeito as observações de Mário Perini (2004, p. 62) em A língua do Brasil amanhã e outros mistérios, em relação ao emprego do pronome seu. Ele pergunta: que quer dizer seu? E observa que as gramáticas e os manuais de ensino de português para estrangeiros não levam em conta esse detalhe da ambigüidade do pronome, que pode acarretar muitos mal-entendidos.

Diz o autor: no português falado, seu significa apenas “de você” (com uma exceção, que seria o caso de construções mais ou menos fixas, como “Fulano e sua cara de pau”, ou “Lá vem fulano com suas piadas de mau gosto”). Nos outros casos, usamos as formas analíticas dele, dela, deles, delas, e inclusive de vocês, porque seu só vale para o singular. Uma frase como “Vou convidar a Patrícia e seu marido para jantar lá em casa”, normalmente, significa: “vou convidar Patrícia e o marido de Patrícia”. Mas essa mesma frase falada significa outra coisa: vou convidar a Patrícia e o marido de quem me escuta (ou seja, o “teu” marido). Perini relata que percebeu isso, quando viu uma estrangeira, ao escutar um disco de Maria Betânia, dizer a uma amiga brasileira: “Sua voz é muito bonita. Ao que a amiga respondeu: “Obrigada”. Na verdade, a estrangeira queria dizer: A voz dela, de Maria Betânia, é muito bonita”, mas usou sua, como mandam as gramáticas, e errou.




http://www.filologia.org.br/viiicnlf/an ... 13-01.html
विकृतिः एवम्‌ प्रकृति
learning in 2019: (no-nn)


Return to “Portuguese (Português)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest