Português - ILE

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Osias
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Osias » 2010-02-04, 14:12

Me parece que na verdade é pior. Mas eu não tenho como provar estatisticamente.
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-05, 5:11

The 'strong' bit, I wanted to confirm the use of forte to mean 'a lot of.' That's how they meant it, right? I mean, the idiom of the makeup being 'strong' is how I assumed it, unless the makeup was powerlifting or something... :P

Anyway, do y'all know of any good European Portuguese resources for news tidbits then? I noticed that this one had been editted after being submitted, because there was and audio version, which I listened to, and ended up understanding most of the text. :)
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-07, 7:53

Also, where do you Portuguese speakers buy books online? I'm looking for...er...any novel in Portuguese really. :P
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby sergiolopes » 2010-02-07, 11:52

ILuvEire wrote:Also, where do you Portuguese speakers buy books online? I'm looking for...er...any novel in Portuguese really. :P


Well.. since most books I want are actually in English, I buy mine from Amazon. As for Portuguese ones, I usually buy them in person at Fnac, Bertrand or Wook (Fnac and Wook links are already pointing to Portuguese language literature).

I really don't know about the quality of their service as far as online shopping goes. I only tried it once with Wook and I had a bad experience, as one of the books apparently went out of stock some hours after I placed my order and I had to wait A LOT for the whole order to arrive. Ironically, the book that delayed everything was actually an abridged version aimed at simple-minded folk and I had to return it. :(
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-08, 1:15

Obrigado :) I love the name wook, even if it sounds like a racial slur.

I think I'm going to try those sites, I dunno really what I'm after. :P
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Osias » 2010-02-08, 10:23

Eu nunca compro livros on-line. On-line, até hoje, só comprei passagem de avião.

Na verdade eu quase não compro mesmo, por absoluta falta de grana.
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-21, 23:02

Well, I was at a used bookstore, and I bought the book "Não toque no gato" by Mary Stewart, it sounded interesting, but I had never heard of the English version. This'll be a fun experience, reading a book for the first time in another language!

I do have a question about the title already, what exactly does the construction "não toque no gato" bring to the translation? Why don't they say "não toque o gato?" Is it an archaism? The English title is "Touch not the cat," which is an archaism. :hmm:

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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Psi-Lord » 2010-02-22, 0:41

ILuvEire wrote:I do have a question about the title already, what exactly does the construction "não toque no gato" bring to the translation? Why don't they say "não toque o gato?" Is it an archaism? The English title is "Touch not the cat," which is an archaism. :hmm:

I usually leave such subjective questions to the Europeans, since their view may be different. However, it’s a hot evening and I’ve got nothing else to do, so I’m sticking my nose here. :P

Strictly speaking, as a matter of fact, there’s no real difference between tocar and tocar em. That is, tocar may take either a (bare) direct object or govern the preposition em in many¹ of its meanings, with no significant change.

To my ears, não toque o gato actually sounds slightly more stilted than não toque no gato, but it may be just me. Besides, I’ve never heard of the book, so the translator may’ve had his own reasons for such a choice (or not).

¹ I say ‘many’ because a quick look in a dictionary gets me 33 different definitions under tocar, many of which work like this, and many of which do not.
português do Brasil (pt-BR)British English (en-GB) galego (gl) português (pt) •• العربية (ar) български (bg) Cymraeg (cy) Deutsch (de)  r n km.t (egy) español rioplatense (es-AR) 日本語 (ja) 한국어 (ko) lingua Latina (la) ••• Esperanto (eo) (grc) français (fr) (hi) magyar (hu) italiano (it) polski (pl) Türkçe (tr) 普通話 (zh-CN)

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Re: Português - ILE

Postby sergiolopes » 2010-02-22, 10:31

I just want to add that "tocar o gato" would make me interpret it as "play the cat", as if he had some frets and strings. :)
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Psi-Lord » 2010-02-24, 0:01

sergiolopes wrote:I just want to add that "tocar o gato" would make me interpret it as "play the cat", as if he had some frets and strings. :)

Hah, good one! :lol:

And yet another meaning that has just occurred me (and I’m surprised it totally escaped me the other night) – tocar o gato, with no context, might, at least in Brazil, also mean ‘to shoo the cat away’. :P :D That might actually be an excellent reason to make it tocar no gato instead.
português do Brasil (pt-BR)British English (en-GB) galego (gl) português (pt) •• العربية (ar) български (bg) Cymraeg (cy) Deutsch (de)  r n km.t (egy) español rioplatense (es-AR) 日本語 (ja) 한국어 (ko) lingua Latina (la) ••• Esperanto (eo) (grc) français (fr) (hi) magyar (hu) italiano (it) polski (pl) Türkçe (tr) 普通話 (zh-CN)

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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-25, 3:34

Haha! This is probably my favorite part of learning a language, the little colloquialisms and humorous interpretations!! :D
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-08-04, 6:14

Hey, look, I have one of these threads as well! In Italian, when you're commanding someone to do something, you sometimes will append the direct object -te to it. Like "corrite!" (terrible example, I can't think of anything better :P ) Does Portuguese do this? For example, could I say "corrá-te!"
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby BlackZ » 2010-08-04, 23:46

In Brazilian Portuguese not, and I'm fairly sure it's the same with European Portuguese.

I would say "corra!" or "corre!" in such situation.
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Stawrberry » 2010-08-05, 2:29

You only have to add -te or -se when the verb is reflexive, I think.

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Re: Português - ILE

Postby sergiolopes » 2010-08-05, 8:45

Stawrberry's right. Not all verbs can take the clitic pronoun that indicates reflexivity. I'm also wondering: wouldn't that also be the case in Italian?
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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Covered » 2010-09-11, 17:33

well, colloquialy you may hear "Vai-te embora" or "Anda-te" here in Brazil, but I suppose it's not correct. :silly:

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Re: Português - ILE

Postby Luís » 2010-09-11, 21:26

Covered wrote:well, colloquialy you may hear "Vai-te embora" or "Anda-te" here in Brazil, but I suppose it's not correct. :silly:


Why shouldn't it be? ;)
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