Learning French

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musicman1982
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Joined: 2016-07-16, 10:46
Real Name: Matthew
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Country: GB United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

Learning French

Postby musicman1982 » 2017-06-02, 11:53

Hello, my name is Matthew, I am English, I live in London and I am interested in learning your language. I have come across a couple of things that I wanted to ask, if anyone is able to answer these questions, it will be appreciated.

1. Does your language have articles in or not, if so what type of articles are used?

2. When it comes to sentence structure with statements, questions, etc. How is grammar used in your language? I have come across a list by Tim Ferris, who has written twelve sentences with different types of grammar structure, I will list them below:



The apple is red

It is john’s apple

I give john the apple

we give him the apple

He give it to john

She gives it to him

is the apple red

The apples are red

I must give it to him

I want to give it to her

I’m going to know tomorrow.

I can’t eat the apple.

I know what I am asking is very specific, but if anyone can answer this question, this will be greatly appreciated. If anyone can, you can say, e.g “Sentence one, will be a statement”, “Sentence six would be a question,” etc.

3. Are there any words in English that are not used in your language?

Again, I know I am asking a lot of these questions. I am not looking for a lot of information. Just something to start off with and work on. I am learning Latvian at the moment, so I am fully aware what the commitment is to learning a language. If you can spare the time, i will gladly take on board anything you say, thank you for your time and patience.

Kind regards,

Matthew.

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IpseDixit
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Re: Learning French

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-06-08, 13:56

musicman1982 wrote:2. When it comes to sentence structure with statements, questions, etc. How is grammar used in your language? I have come across a list by Tim Ferris, who has written twelve sentences with different types of grammar structure, I will list them below:



The apple is red

It is john’s apple

I give john the apple

we give him the apple

He give it to john

She gives it to him

is the apple red

The apples are red

I must give it to him

I want to give it to her

I’m going to know tomorrow.

I can’t eat the apple.

I know what I am asking is very specific, but if anyone can answer this question, this will be greatly appreciated. If anyone can, you can say, e.g “Sentence one, will be a statement”, “Sentence six would be a question,” etc.


I really don't get this point. Those sentences are in English.

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Estrella
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Joined: 2017-06-11, 20:55
Gender: female

Re: Learning French

Postby Estrella » 2017-06-12, 18:22

musicman1982 wrote:1. Does your language have articles in or not, if so what type of articles are used?


Yes.

Definite articles:
- Le (with masculine singular nouns)
- La (with feminine singular nouns)
- L' (before a singular noun starting with a vowel or a mute H)
- Les (with plural nouns)

Indefinite articles:
- Un (with masculine singular nouns)
- Une (with feminine singular nouns)
- Des (with plural nouns)

Partitives articles (they don't exist in English, they are used to indicate an indefinite portion of something uncountable or an indefinite number of something countable):
- du (with masculine nouns)
- de la (with feminine nouns)
- de l' (before a singular noun starting with a vowel or a mute H)
- des (with plural nouns)

musicman1982 wrote:2. When it comes to sentence structure with statements, questions, etc. How is grammar used in your language? I have come across a list by Tim Ferris, who has written twelve sentences with different types of grammar structure, I will list them below:

I know what I am asking is very specific, but if anyone can answer this question, this will be greatly appreciated. If anyone can, you can say, e.g “Sentence one, will be a statement”, “Sentence six would be a question,” etc.


I'll translate these sentences so you'll be able to compare the structure.

The apple is red. = La pomme est rouge.

It is john’s apple. = C'est la pomme de John.

I give john the apple. = Je donne la pomme à John.

We give him the apple. = Nous lui donnons la pomme.

He gives it to john. = Il la donne à John.

She gives it to him. = Elle la lui donne.

Is the apple red? = La pomme est-elle rouge? / Est-ce que la pomme est rouge?

The apples are red. = Les pommes sont rouges.

I must give it to him = Je dois la lui donner.

I want to give it to her = Je veux la lui donner.

I’m going to know tomorrow. = Je vais le savoir demain.

I can’t eat the apple. = Je ne peux pas manger la pomme.

musicman1982 wrote:3. Are there any words in English that are not used in your language?


Yes. For example, in French we don't have a word for "sibling". So you would have to say "frère ou soeur", which means "brother or sister".
Native: [flag=]fr[/flag] Fluent: [flag=]en[/flag] [flag=]es[/flag] [flag=]pt[/flag] Learning: [flag=]ja[/flag]

French Lessons on YouTube / Lecciones de francés:
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musicman1982
Posts: 26
Joined: 2016-07-16, 10:46
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: GB United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

Re: Learning French

Postby musicman1982 » 2017-06-15, 7:40

Thank you very much, I will have a look at this.

SM11
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Country: FR France (France)

Re: Learning French

Postby SM11 » 2018-08-31, 11:40

musicman1982 wrote:3. Are there any words in English that are not used in your language?

Matthew.


Hi Matthew !

Here are a few words I can think of right now:

healthy (about a person) : en bonne santé

to hug : serrer [qn] dans ses bras or faire un câlin

cheap : bon marché or pas chère

to befriend : se lier d'amitié avec or devenir ami avec

somehow: en quelque sorte or d'une certaine manière

comprehensive : complet, global, total, exhaustif. There's no real equivalent in French. Note that the French word compréhensif means understanding or sympathetic.

shallow : peu profond

both/either : les deux/l'un ou l'autre

successful : [qn/qch] qui a réussi


I hope that can help

Simon
articles about French and language learning on my blog (https://blogfrench.com/blog/)


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