Modern Hebrew Stress

Gonzo
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Modern Hebrew Stress

Postby Gonzo » 2019-03-06, 4:24

Hi,
I'm currently working through the Duolingo vocab, and am trying to figure out the stress for the last remaining words in my list. I cannot find the stress anywhere, but found milog, which has audio. I'm not sure if I'm hearing them right, so would it be possible for someone to check over what I've done already? Many thanks.

Gonzo
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Re: Modern Hebrew Stress

Postby Gonzo » 2019-03-07, 3:32

Here are the words in question. I have the stressed vowel in bold, colours indicated word class. This is what I think they are, but I'd just like conformation that they are correct.
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Drink
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Re: Modern Hebrew Stress

Postby Drink » 2019-03-07, 22:35

Good job, here are the ones that you got wrong:

Category - kategoriya - קטגורייה
Doctorate, PhD - doktorat - דוקטורט
Dumb - metumtam - מטומטם
Each Other - ekhad (-)sheni - אחד (-)שני (you got the stress right, but swapped the vowels)
Effect - efekt - אפקט
Euro - eiro - אירו (not 100% sure myself though)
Harmonica - mapukhit - מפוחית
Hat Trick - sh'losha'ar - שלושער
Lecturer - martze - מרצה
Marathon - maraton - מרתון
Mass - masa - מסה
Milimeter - milimeter - מילימטר
Pasta - pasta - פסטה
Penalty Kick - pendel - פנדל
Physics - fizika - פיזיקה
Professional - miktzo'i - מקצועי
Quadrilateral - m'ruba' - מרובע
Repulsive - dokhe - דוחה
Robot - robot - רובוט
Saucer - tzlokhit - צלוחית
Two Days - yomayim - יומיים (yomiyim is the plural of "daily" with the same spelling)
What Is? (f) - mahi - מהי
Where From? - me'eifo - מאיפה (what you had is technically correct, but no one would say it that way)

Iffy cases:
If Not - ilule - אילולא (I'm not quite sure about this one, I think it could also be ilule, and I'm not sure which is more common)
Metazda/Massada - m'tzada - מצדה (you definitely got this right, but I think m'tzada is also possible and common, but I'm not sure)
שתה וגם גמליך אשקה

Gonzo
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Re: Modern Hebrew Stress

Postby Gonzo » 2019-03-08, 0:27

Thanks Drink! This is a massive help! I still need some time to start hearing the stress and intonation patterns properly, so this is going to be very useful for me. The verbs are more predictable, but the other words seem more unpredictable to me.

Regards,
Gonzo :D

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Golv
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Re: Modern Hebrew Stress

Postby Golv » 2019-03-10, 18:32

Drink wrote:Euro - eiro - אירו (not 100% sure myself though)

That is correct, but it is more commonly pronounced 'yuro'.
Marathon - maraton - מרתון

maraton
Robot - robot - רובוט

robot exists as well and not uncommon.
Iffy cases:
If Not - ilule - אילולא (I'm not quite sure about this one, I think it could also be ilule, and I'm not sure which is more common)

It's ilule, never ilule.
Metazda/Massada - m'tzada - מצדה (you definitely got this right, but I think m'tzada is also possible and common, but I'm not sure)

Could be.
Among other uses of the habit, Hebrew changes the stress of words from ultimate to penultimate position in order to distinguish between nouns and names (e.g. ilan for 'tree', but ilan when used as a name), and it could become the case with מצדה (which is a noun and means 'fortress').

Furthermore, in some sense, every word with the stress in ultimate position has a potential less formal/substandard version with the stress in penultimate position (the broader function of this habit is to grant a word a less formal tone which sometimes serves to distinguish between the standard sense of a word to less standard meanings, but not necessarily), so I wouldn't be surprised to learn some kiddo somewhere pronounce it as metzada, but I have never heard it done in reference to the famous fortress and wouldn't pronounce it so myself.


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