Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

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Luís
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-11-13, 14:42

Golv wrote:
Luís wrote::) !תודה

I've been going through Assimil Hebrew and I'm coming across things such as שיעור שש עשרה. Considering שיעור is a masculine noun, shouldn't it be שיעור שישה עשר? :hmm:


It's a nominal number, which always take the feminine form.
I'd only consider it a mistake of consistency if they used ordinal numbers in previous chapters.


That's exactly what happened. In the first ten lessons they used ordinal numbers in the masculine form. And then they suddenly started using feminine cardinal numbers. It confused me a bit :)

Golv wrote:All correct, except I'd say מחשב נייד is at least as common as לפטופ (probably more common), and מחשב נישא hardly ever sees use, certainly not in speech.


Is לפטופ pronounced with an /a/ or an /e/?

And what exactly does פולניה mean then? Does it refer to an historical region (e.g. Poland before WWII)?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2017-11-14, 2:38

Luís wrote:Is לפטופ pronounced with an /a/ or an /e/?


With an /e/.

Luís wrote:And what exactly does פולניה mean then? Does it refer to an historical region (e.g. Poland before WWII)?

They are both names for Poland, historical and modern, and have no distinction in meaning. פולניה has fallen out of use though.
The convention of rendering country names into Hebrew by adding the suffix -ia to the original name of the country has largely yielded to the more lenient approach of simply adopting the original name*, as much as Hebrew phonology allows it, but for the short time it persisted, it gave us פולניה.

שוויץ and שוויצריה are one other similar case (where the variant name שוויצריה is actually quite common), but you could probably also find instances of אירלנדיה, פורטוגליה and other abhorrations.

*) or sometimes the name as it exists in another language. פולין, I believe, was inspired by the German name for Poland.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-11-14, 20:57

I just learned from my book that the preposition ל is to be pronounced /li/ before a word with a schwa in the first syllable. Can I safely ignore this and pronounce it consistently as /le/? :P How often do Israelis actually follow this rule?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Drink » 2017-11-14, 21:21

Luís wrote:Can I safely ignore this and pronounce it consistently as /le/? :P

You won't die.

Luís wrote:How often do Israelis actually follow this rule?

Practically never.
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challenge - best free hebrew text translation tools

Postby max123 » 2017-11-25, 6:59

Hi folks,

one of the most important tools for learning any language
is a good translation service or dictionary.

When it comes to hebrew Google Translator is not very reliable. :silly:

Thankful for any useful hebrew text and word translation service.

I»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»Thanks4Support!Best Regards!»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»

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Hebrew Courses and Study Classes

Postby max123 » 2017-11-25, 7:03

Hi folks,

still searching the forum for hebrew course and study class.

Could anyone tell me where to find the learning hebrew material for forum members?

I»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»Thanks4Support!Best Regards!»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»

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Re: challenge - best free hebrew text translation tools

Postby caleteu » 2017-11-25, 17:30

I like http://www.lexilogos.com/english/hebrew_dictionary.htm#. But I do prefer a printed lexikon with niqqud, and only use lexilogos when Alcalay isn't up to date.
Yours, Caleteu

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Re: Hebrew Courses and Study Classes

Postby Lemanensis » 2017-11-25, 19:43

max123 wrote:Hi folks,

still searching the forum for hebrew course and study class.

Could anyone tell me where to find the learning hebrew material for forum members?

I»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»Thanks4Support!Best Regards!»­( ̄`v ́ ̄)­»


Hi
What are you looking for exactly?
Martin
http://www.hebrew.ecott.ch <= catalogue of resources for learning Modern Hebrew

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-11-27, 22:08

What exactly is the difference between תמונה and צילום? Are they interchangeable?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2017-11-29, 19:55

Luís wrote:What exactly is the difference between תמונה and צילום? Are they interchangeable?


תמונה just means any 'picture'. צילום specifically means 'photo'. Just like in English, people will use תמונה to mean a photo.
Martin
http://www.hebrew.ecott.ch <= catalogue of resources for learning Modern Hebrew

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how to read numerals

Postby caleteu » 2017-12-12, 18:57

When letters of the alphabet are used as numerals, do you pronounce them as letters or numbers? Is א, for example, "aleph " or "echad"?
thanks!
Caleteu

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Re: how to read numerals

Postby Luís » 2017-12-12, 21:36

I believe you read them as letters. For instance, י׳׳ב would be yod bet. But it's better if a native speaker (or an advanced learner) can confirm it.
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-12-14, 21:16

How exactly are we supposed to decide which spelling to use? Today I came across a word that has four possible spellings: לוין, לוויין, לווין, לויין. The first one is the defective spelling... but how does one choose between the others? :?
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Re: challenge - best free hebrew text translation tools

Postby Drink » 2017-12-18, 18:55

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby księżycowy » 2017-12-22, 18:25

So, I know that generally speaking, the qamets is pronounced /o/ in a closed syllable. But I'm curious if ה is considered as closing a syllable.

Take for instance the following verb:
שתה - he drank
Would that be shatah, or shatoh? (It's traditionally spelled with two qamets)

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Ser » 2017-12-22, 19:15

księżycowy wrote:So, I know that generally speaking, the qamets is pronounced /o/ in a closed syllable. But I'm curious if ה is considered as closing a syllable.

Take for instance the following verb:
שתה - he drank
Would that be shatah, or shatoh? (It's traditionally spelled with two qamets)

I don't know Hebrew but this Wikipedia article suggests it'd be shatah, listing it separately as "qamatz male" (and so does this Wiktionary entry, see the pronunciation section).

What I would like to know is, why is the name of qamatz qatan pronounced as such and not "qaton", if the vowelling is קָמַץ קָטָן? Does -tan not count as a closed syllable?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-12-22, 21:30

Ser wrote:What I would like to know is, why is the name of qamatz qatan pronounced as such and not "qaton", if the vowelling is קָמַץ קָטָן? Does -tan not count as a closed syllable?


Because the definition of a "closed syllable" is different in Hebrew... :P

From Wikipedia:

The qamatz sound of [o], known as Qamatz Qaṭan (Hebrew: קָמַץ קָטָן‬, IPA: [kaˈmats kaˈtan], "small qamatz") occurs in a "closed syllable", i.e. one which ends in a consonant marked with a shwa nakh (zero vowel) or with a dagesh ḥazaq (which indicates that the consonant was pronounced geminated, i.e. doubled);

The qamatz sound of [a], known as Qamatz Gadol (Hebrew: קָמַץ גדול‬ [kaˈmats ɡaˈdol], "big qamatz") occurs in an "open syllable", i.e. any other circumstance: one which ends in a consonant followed by a normal vowel, a consonant at the end of a word and with no vowel marking, or a consonant marked with a shwa na (originally pronounced [ǝ]).


So yeah, according to this definition טָן is definitely an open syllable..
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-12-22, 21:33

księżycowy wrote:So, I know that generally speaking, the qamets is pronounced /o/ in a closed syllable. But I'm curious if ה is considered as closing a syllable.

Take for instance the following verb:
שתה - he drank
Would that be shatah, or shatoh? (It's traditionally spelled with two qamets)


That would be open.

Besides, that's the basic form of a pa'al verb, so by definition it should be XaXaX
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby księżycowy » 2017-12-22, 21:38

That's what made me ask. It wouldn't make sense to have it be XaXoX generally speaking. Not that every verb follows this pattern in the qal, but still.
Either way, it's spelled with a qamets, so I had to ask to be sure.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2017-12-22, 21:46

I thought you didn't care about the damn points anyway :P I certainly don't bother with those subtleties.
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