Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Lemanensis
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2019-01-13, 12:46

Hi guys
I came across what is probably a slang word in an interview in the TV news (about young gamblers).

What does וואלק mean and how is it used?

Thanks
מרטין
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eskandar
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby eskandar » 2019-01-17, 4:54

I'm trying to understand the difference between lamrot she and af al pi she - I take the former to be "although" and the latter to be "in spite of the fact that..." Does that sound correct?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2019-01-17, 9:29

eskandar wrote:I'm trying to understand the difference between lamrot she and af al pi she - I take the former to be "although" and the latter to be "in spite of the fact that..." Does that sound correct?


I think the difference is irrelevant in translation. Both have very similar meanings. The syntactical difference is that למרות (without ש) can be followed by a noun. And in register למרות is likely to be more everyday and the other more formal.
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby eskandar » 2019-01-17, 22:57

Thanks!
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby caleteu » 2019-03-20, 18:37

What is the difference between העיר and עורר? My Hebrew text suggest that they mean the same thing, but would they be used differently?
Thank you! Caleteu

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2019-03-23, 8:11

They don't mean the same thing, though obviously related.

לעורר means "to rouse": to bring forth, to excite interest, make alert, or motivate an action.
It might sometimes be interchangable with להעיר (to wake up), but generally has a stronger sense.

Some examples:
לעורר לבבות - stir the hearts
עורר גל ביקורת - roused a wave of criticism
עורר בי בחילה - made me nauseous
עורר חשד- aroused suspicion
מצבנו הנוכחי עורר אותי לכתוב את זה- our current situation brought me to write this
הקפה עורר אותי - the coffee made me more alert

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby caleteu » 2019-03-23, 18:11

Golv wrote:They don't mean the same thing, though obviously related.

לעורר means "to rouse": to bring forth, to excite interest, make alert, or motivate an action.
It might sometimes be interchangable with להעיר (to wake up), but generally has a stronger sense.

Some examples:
לעורר לבבות - stir the hearts
עורר גל ביקורת - roused a wave of criticism
עורר בי בחילה - made me nauseous
עורר חשד- aroused suspicion
מצבנו הנוכחי עורר אותי לכתוב את זה- our current situation brought me to write this
הקפה עורר אותי - the coffee made me more alert

Would לעוררbe used with a person as subject?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2019-03-24, 9:59

Very keen of you to observe I haven't explicitly stated a person agent in any of my examples, but yes, it could.

Such phrases as מעורר חשד (arousing suspicion = suspicious), מעורר רחמים (arousing pity = pitiful, pathetic) can definitely take a person as the subject and are commonly used.

Other usages with a person agent might be less common, but possible.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2019-06-05, 18:44

1. Does התגלח refer specifically to shaving a beard or can it be used in a more general way (e.g. shaving your legs, head, etc.)
2. How would you refer to a light meal/snack in the middle of the afternoon? Is ארוחת ארבע something Israelis would use?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby eskandar » 2019-06-06, 21:26

Luís wrote:2. How would you refer to a light meal/snack in the middle of the afternoon? Is ארוחת ארבע something Israelis would use?

What comes to mind for me is לנשנש lenashnesh, "to nibble; to [have a] snack", from Yiddish nosh (which is also used in English, at least in the US).
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2019-06-07, 11:24

Luís wrote:1. Does התגלח refer specifically to shaving a beard or can it be used in a more general way (e.g. shaving your legs, head, etc.)


It can be used to talk about the general act of shaving any area in one's body, but normally would be understood to mean the face when used by men. When a woman uses it, it probably means the works.

eskandar wrote:
Luís wrote:2. How would you refer to a light meal/snack in the middle of the afternoon? Is ארוחת ארבע something Israelis would use?

What comes to mind for me is לנשנש lenashnesh, "to nibble; to [have a] snack", from Yiddish nosh (which is also used in English, at least in the US).


לנשנש isn't associated with any part of the day though.

Google reveals the idea of ארוחת ארבע must be familiar to at least some Israelis, but we don't really have such a formalized concept of snack time. Referring to any meal with a hour reminds me of school.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2019-07-18, 20:43

A few more questions...

:arrow: What exactly is the difference between סירה and אונייה?

:arrow: Are ויזה and אשרה the same thing?

:arrow: Is עליונית the word for "vest"? Can it also be used when, for instance, talking about the Yellow Vests in France or is it something more specific?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2019-07-20, 10:53

Luís wrote: What exactly is the difference between סירה and אונייה?

The same difference there is between a boat and a ship.
Luís wrote: Are ויזה and אשרה the same thing?

Yes.
Luís wrote:Is עליונית the word for "vest"? Can it also be used when, for instance, talking about the Yellow Vests in France or is it something more specific?

The word for "vest" is אפוד.
As far as I know, עליונית is a light, top layer garment for women. Some light cardigans might be called עליוניות.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Luís » 2019-08-11, 11:51

Is אוירון still used nowadays or is מטוס the most common word? If so, is there any difference between the two?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby caleteu » 2019-09-04, 18:08

I am confused. Is there a rule for the addition or substraction of א ?
The plural of ברייה for example, is בריאות
The passive participle of מילא for example isמילוי
I know that the root of both words ends on א . Is there a rule for the addition or substraction of א?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Mikey93 » 2019-09-04, 20:10

caleteu wrote:I am confused. Is there a rule for the addition or substraction of א ?
The plural of ברייה for example, is בריאות
The passive participle of מילא for example isמילוי
I know that the root of both words ends on א . Is there a rule for the addition or substraction of א?


First of all, aleph and heh are very unstable consonants, which are prone to either lose their consonantal values and remain as purely orthographic fossils, or they may drop out entirely. This is something you might discover only if you dwelve into the older layers of Hebrew. In Modern Hebrew usually only one form of a word is accepted so it can be confusing.

Unlike the letter ע, aleph is a rather inaudible gluttural sound and it loses it's consonantal value whenever you'll find it at the end of the word. It merely signals the preceeding long vowel (for the sake of argument; in Modern Hebrew there is no difference between long and short vowel) ====)
מִלּוּא (it's a doublet, the same meaning as מילוי), מָלֵא , הֵבִיא, חֵטְא (חָטָא) , שְׁוָא etc. Aleph is completely silent, merely orthographic.

(In cases like דוגמא, קופסא etc, the aleph is a remnant of the Aramaic definite article. So קופסא in Aramaic is basically הקופסה in Hebrew. You may find in Hebrew both forms קופסא and קופסה, but language purists would insist on קופסה.)

Usually when a word or syllable begins with aleph, it retains it's consonantal value. However, there are words when even in such cases the aleph is violently supressed (it is made silent) and remains in the word purely as an embelishment. ====)
מְלָאכָה, מְלַאכְתֶּךָ, יִשְׁמָעֵאל , (future tense of verbs that begin with aleph like אכל - אוכל)

And so it happens, that in cases when aleph looses its consonantal value it might be substituted with י or ה. Like ימלא can be also ימלה and ראם can be also רים and מילוא can be also מילוי and so ברייה is the same as בריאה and so on.

In many instances it's just dropped ====)
יצאתי - יצתי
מלאתי - מלתי
חמאה - חמה
And many more... these are all doublets and show how unstable aleph was and in spoken biblical language it seemingly didn't play significance, as it was often dropped by the scribes themselves. In Modern Hebrew, in these cases, only the forms with aleph exist.

There are many more rules as to what happens to these weak letters and when these changes occur, but if you're not interested in the very deep linguistic understanding of Hebrew, I think it's irrelevant. In case you find this interesting I recommend to start with Gesenius grammar book.
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