Korean-LiShaoXuan

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2008-10-27, 15:49

Yes, really; there's a significant vocab discount for CJKs learning each others' language... but they can't call it cheating, come on; any English speaker would enjoy similar discount when they learn French.

Btw, nice to see another one of my kinfolks here; welcome to unilang, kid2kiddo. It's been years that I remained the only active Korean here...
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby kid2kiddo » 2008-10-27, 16:18

D
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Senyani » 2008-10-27, 21:33

I never knew that. That's amazing!

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Se inelos tarvi keuma se ilé doma kavu.

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2008-10-28, 3:47

Well, "kinfolk" is one of the words that *I* quite often use, but it's not necessarily Canadian English. I don't hear that word used in Canada either, but I just use it when I find the context suitable enough. ;)
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-28, 8:18

noir wrote:Well, "kinfolk" is one of the words that *I* quite often use, but it's not necessarily Canadian English. I don't hear that word used in Canada either, but I just use it when I find the context suitable enough. ;)

Hehe. You'd hear it much more often i the south. Usually shortened to "kin." It also has the meaning of family (which I'm not sure "kinfolk" has).
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Tenebrarum » 2008-10-28, 13:30

kid2kiddo wrote:You might not believe me, but even Southeast Asian (Thai, Vietnamese, etc.) have a root in Chinese, despite how minute it is.

I don't know what you mean but apart from loaned lexicon Thai and Vietnamese are totally unrelated to the Chinese bunch.

Burmese is the only Southeast Asian language has been proven to be distantly related to the Chinese family. Thai just might be, though there's no conclusive evidence. Vietnamese is as related to Chinese as Korean and Japanese (that is, obviously not).
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby kid2kiddo » 2008-10-29, 22:52

D
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2008-10-30, 3:44

Well, there's nothing wrong in saying Vietnamese, Thai and Lao are completely unrelated to Chinese, in terms of their genetic relationships. But in terms of the loanwords and later influences, there might still be a considerable chunk as kid2kiddo says..
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Tenebrarum » 2008-10-30, 4:23

kid2kiddo wrote:How do you know, as minor an influence may be, that Chinese had absolutely no influence in your language? That's a presumptuous argument to make.

Excuse me? At which point did I say Chinese had no influence? Everyone knows Classical Chinese had a huge sway over other Asian languages; 60 to 70% of Vietnamese's vocabulary, for instance, is Sinitic. Uh duh, shocking. But if you go further to say that's our "root", I'm afraid that's ridiculously superficial, just like looking at English's lexicon and saying it has "root" in French or Latin.
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby kid2kiddo » 2008-10-30, 12:20

D
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Tenebrarum » 2008-10-30, 12:30

kid2kiddo wrote:If you didn't mean it, watch your diction.

Like you do.
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby lishaoxuan » 2008-11-07, 19:07

Are there Chinese loan words in Thai and Burmese?

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby lishaoxuan » 2008-11-07, 19:14

And let's get back to questions about Korean:
What's the difference between 있어요 and 계세요?

Some say the difference is about existence and possession, other say the it's about plain and respectful.

I'm confused.

And when talking about family members, who needs to be honored, and who doesn't? Is it same when talking about one's own family members and other people's family members?

Could someone explain?

感謝!

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2008-11-08, 4:55

lishaoxuan wrote:And let's get back to questions about Korean:
What's the difference between 있어요 and 계세요?

Some say the difference is about existence and possession, other say the it's about plain and respectful.

I'm confused.

And when talking about family members, who needs to be honored, and who doesn't? Is it same when talking about one's own family members and other people's family members?

Could someone explain?

感謝!


Both correct.

여기에 있어요. (I am here.)
책이 있어요. (There is a book.)
저한테 책이 있어요. (I have a book: lit. There is a book to me.)

있다 denotes existence of something, and it is also used to describe possession.

저기에 계세요. (He/she is there.)

계시다 is a more respectful version of it, but since honorifics are for the people, this is not used to describe possession.
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Rounin » 2008-11-22, 2:25

lishaoxuan wrote:Are there Chinese loan words in Thai and Burmese?

There are in Thai, at least. Don't ask me about the extent, though; the only first-hand examples I've seen are some of the numerals. For instance, ad I saw featured the number "30", which was pronounced "sam-ship", as in Korean. There's a guy called Stuart Jay Raj ( http://stujay.blogspot.com/ ) who speaks several of these languages, so his blog may have more information on the various parallels.

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby lishaoxuan » 2009-02-01, 22:30

The difference between 무슨 어느?
Could some one explain with some example sentences? Thanks a lot.

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2009-02-02, 0:08

lishaoxuan wrote:The difference between 무슨 어느?
Could some one explain with some example sentences? Thanks a lot.


무슨 what
어느 which

"무슨 문제야?" What's the problem?
"어느게 문제인데?" Which one is the problem?
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby lishaoxuan » 2009-02-04, 6:21

What's the difference between 안 and 못?
as in 안가요 and 못가요.
Thx

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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Karavinka » 2009-02-04, 6:45

lishaoxuan wrote:What's the difference between 안 and 못?
as in 안가요 and 못가요.
Thx


안가요. I don't go. (I'm not willing to go.)
못가요. I can't go. (I'm unable to go, whether I want or not.)
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Re: Korean-LiShaoXuan

Postby Rounin » 2009-07-03, 10:32

noir wrote:안가요. I don't go. (I'm not willing to go.)
못가요. I can't go. (I'm unable to go, whether I want or not.)

How about "가지 않아요" and "가지 못해요"? Do they mean the same things as "안가요" and "못가요", respectively, or is there some sort of difference in meaning or nuance?


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