IpseDixit - German

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linguoboy
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Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-17, 16:44

IpseDixit wrote:Pear and Pfirsich don't sound too close but not too different either to really dismiss the hypothesis that it was an error.

FWIW, "pear" and "peach" are also very close orthographically.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-10-17, 17:08

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Pear and Pfirsich don't sound too close but not too different either to really dismiss the hypothesis that it was an error.

FWIW, "pear" and "peach" are also very close orthographically.


Yeah, that's also true.

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Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-18, 4:58

Pear, peach, and der Pfirsich all resemble each other so closely that whenever I see any form of the word "Pfirsich" and try to translate it into English, the first word that comes to mind for me is pear even if I'm simultaneously visualizing peaches.

EDIT: Also, it's intriguing to me that there's a comma after als Flints Witwe.

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Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby Car » 2018-10-18, 9:50

vijayjohn wrote:EDIT: Also, it's intriguing to me that there's a comma after als Flints Witwe.

It's inserted into the phrase, so it needs a comma before and after.

See here
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caleteu
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Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby caleteu » 2018-10-19, 6:16

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:I'm not sure why you're concerned with finding fitting English translations in any case. The point of the exercise is to learn German, right? If you understand what a Herrin is and what it means to say fields are zugehörig, what difference does it make what we might call them in English? If you want to know what we'd use, why not just look at the original text?


Ditto. My German teachers all emphasized that we should try to not translate. German doesn't differ from English just in the vocabulary. The idioms are different and the way you put words together make sentences is different. As a matter of fact, if I may share my own experiences with Greek and Hebrew, you become more fluent by not translating. Look up the words you don't know and try to understand the sentence without translating.

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - German

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-10-19, 11:27

caleteu wrote:Ditto. My German teachers all emphasized that we should try to not translate. German doesn't differ from English just in the vocabulary. The idioms are different and the way you put words together make sentences is different. As a matter of fact, if I may share my own experiences with Greek and Hebrew, you become more fluent by not translating. Look up the words you don't know and try to understand the sentence without translating.


If I want to have feedbacks from other people to see if I've really understood what the text says, I have to translate. And in any case, I'm not really translating word for word.

Anayway, I haven't asked for suggestions on how I should go about learning German. I don't know what makes you think I need a lecture on how German differs from English and what the best techniques to learn it are.


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