Questions in the read text, please correct my understanding

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Kumar001
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Real Name: Pawan Kumar
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Questions in the read text, please correct my understanding

Postby Kumar001 » 2021-06-12, 17:30

Dear Friends,

Good afternoon. Please bear with me for the length of this email, as I wish to write what I understood and seek your valuable advise(s).

I have come across the following text (as attached Wegschreibung.jpg) in the book titled "Sabine Dinsel, Susanne Geiger - Großes Übungsbuch Deutsch_ Grammatik ( 2009, Hueber)" - Page 9. I am not sure if I understood the content (Prepositions, adjective endings correctly).So I am writing what I understood / and what is not understood, seek your kind support to correct me where I have gone wrong. Thanks in advance for your valuable support and would be glad to get in touch with someone living close to Karlsruhe, Germany.

1) Formen ---- um : Why is it separable / Trennbare verb ?
2) ankommen : Why is it unseparable / Untrennbare verb ?
3) den Schildern : Is "den" because of Akkusativ, if so why Schildern, as das/der Schild ; die Schilder/die Schilde. In case of Akkusativ it should be den Schilder or den Schilde.

Is "den" because of Dativ, plural, if so how do I identify this is a case of Dativ ?
4) Am Automaten : Why "Am" ? der Automat, die Automaten. Is "Am" because of Dativ, as the Automat is already positioned/existing in that location/place ? In that case "Automaten" being plural, is "Am" still right?
5) kaufen: Why only kaufen and no kaufen --- ein or einkaufen ?
6) in die U-Bahn Richtung Messe: Is "in" here an Akkusative preposition ? Because, Richtung is a direction and there is an action / movement involved ?
7) steigen Sie wieder aus: Why is it separable / Trennbare verb ? How do I identify when to separate and when not in general?
8) Am Ausgang: der Ausgang, so here "an" is a Dativ preposition ? Ausgang already being positioned takes Dativ form and therefore an + dem = am ?
9) in die Goethestrasse: "in" is here a Akkusativ preposition ? Strasse involving movement and therefore Akkusativ ?
10) auf der rechten Seite: "auf" here is a Dativ preposition (as the right side is already existing / positioned) and therefore die strasse --> der strasse. "rechten with ending en" because adjective declension corresponds to definite article i.e. "der" / feminine (strasse) / Dativ ?
11) Am besten setzen Sie sich gleich ins Cafe: why "ins" and not "im", das Cafe, but setzen Sie sich meaning already positioned, so is it not a Dativ case? Why " Am besten" ?

Thanks in advance once again and Regards
Kumar
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h34
Posts: 1163
Joined: 2014-12-16, 20:15
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Re: Questions in the read text, please correct my understanding

Postby h34 » 2021-06-19, 8:15

Kumar001 wrote:Dear Friends,

Good afternoon. Please bear with me for the length of this email, as I wish to write what I understood and seek your valuable advise(s).

I have come across the following text (as attached Wegschreibung.jpg) in the book titled "Sabine Dinsel, Susanne Geiger - Großes Übungsbuch Deutsch_ Grammatik ( 2009, Hueber)" - Page 9. I am not sure if I understood the content (Prepositions, adjective endings correctly).So I am writing what I understood / and what is not understood, seek your kind support to correct me where I have gone wrong. Thanks in advance for your valuable support and would be glad to get in touch with someone living close to Karlsruhe, Germany.

1) Formen ---- um : Why is it separable / Trennbare verb ?

The verb umformen is separable. In this sentence, it is used in the imperative mood, which is one of the tenses/moods requiring separable prefixes to be 'detached' from the stem:

umformen (infinitive)
forme … um (imperative singular/plain)
formen Sie … um (imperative plural/polite)

> Formen Sie den Text in die du-Form um.

Kumar001 wrote:2) ankommen : Why is it unseparable / Untrennbare verb ?

Even though ankommen is a separable verb, it is not separated here because of the sentence structure which requires the verb to be in final position. For comparison:

Sie kommen an.
(main clause > an is separated)

Wenn Sie ankommen, …
= …, wenn Sie ankommen.

(subclause requiring the verb to be in final position, where the prefix an is attached to the verb)

Kumar001 wrote:3) den Schildern : Is "den" because of Akkusativ, if so why Schildern, as das/der Schild ; die Schilder/die Schilde. […]. Is "den" because of Dativ, plural, if so how do I identify this is a case of Dativ?

You're right, if it was the accusative case, the correct form would be identical with the nominative plural:
die Schilder
= nominative plural
= accusative plural

However, the verb folgen requires the dative case, so the case used in this sentence is not the accusative but the dative plural: den Schildern.

The article der has the same form in the accusative singular and the dative plural:

den
= accusative singular, masculine
= dative plural, all genders

Kumar001 wrote:4) Am Automaten : Why "Am" ? der Automat, die Automaten. Is "Am" because of Dativ, as the Automat is already positioned/existing in that location/place ? In that case "Automaten" being plural, is "Am" still right?

This might be confusing because Automat is one of those nouns with the 'n-declension' pattern:

Automat
= nominative singular

Automaten
= all other cases

In this sentence, the dative singular is used, which is why the -en suffix is needed.

Kumar001 wrote:5) kaufen: Why only kaufen and no kaufen --- ein or einkaufen ?

Even though einkaufen / kaufen … ein would be grammatically correct as well, kaufen is more natural here.

einkaufen ≈ to do some shopping, to shop, …
kaufen ≈ to buy (something specific)

Kumar001 wrote:6) in die U-Bahn Richtung Messe: Is "in" here an Akkusative preposition ? Because, Richtung is a direction and there is an action / movement involved ?

Yes, that's right.

Kumar001 wrote:7) steigen Sie wieder aus: Why is it separable / Trennbare verb ? How do I identify when to separate and when not in general?

Yes, it is a separable verb. Here it appears in the imperative, so the prefix is separated from the stem:

aussteigen (infinitive)
Steigen Sie aus! (imperative)


Similarly:
einsteigen (infinitive)
Steigen Sie ein! (imperative)
umsteigen (infinitive)
Steigen Sie um! (imperative)


Kumar001 wrote:8) Am Ausgang: der Ausgang, so here "an" is a Dativ preposition ? Ausgang already being positioned takes Dativ form and therefore an + dem = am ?

Yes, exactly.

Kumar001 wrote:9) in die Goethestraße: "in" is here a Akkusativ preposition ? Straße involving movement and therefore Akkusativ ?

Yes, that's correct.

Kumar001 wrote:10) auf der rechten Seite: "auf" here is a Dativ preposition (as the right side is already existing / positioned) and therefore die Straße --> der Straße. "rechten with ending en" because adjective declension corresponds to definite article i.e. "der" / feminine (strasse) / Dativ ?

In this case, der Straße is in the genitive, corresponding to the English 'of the street'.

auf der rechten Seite (dative) …
… der Straße (genitive)


Kumar001 wrote:11) Am besten setzen Sie sich gleich ins Cafe: why "ins" and not "im", das Cafe, but setzen Sie sich meaning already positioned, so is it not a Dativ case?

Perhaps it makes sense if you compare these two sentences:

Wo sitzen sie?
– Sie sitzen im Café
.
(location)

Wohin setzen sie sich?
– Sie setzen sich ins Café.

(direction)

Kumar001 wrote:Why " Am besten" ?

It's just a phrase often used in friendly suggestions, meaning something like 'it would be best (/it would be a good idea) if you did it'. I'm not sure if there is an equivalent in English.
Thanks for any corrections

kevin
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Re: Questions in the read text, please correct my understanding

Postby kevin » 2021-06-20, 13:23

Kumar001 wrote:9) in die Goethestrasse: "in" is here a Akkusativ preposition ? Strasse involving movement and therefore Akkusativ ?

You're right about the movement, but this is not because of the word "Straße". It's about the verb: You can be "in der Goethestraße" (location -> Dativ), but in this sentence you're coming from somewhere else and turning "in die Goethestraße" (direction -> Akkusativ).


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