Help with Danish slang translations

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Mavericker
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Help with Danish slang translations

Postby Mavericker » 2007-08-29, 22:58

Hello. I am interested in and am doing research on Danish youth, street and college slang for a project I'm working on.

I'd like to know:

What are Danish slang terms and expressions for:

tomboy
tough girl
tough woman
girl prone to fighting
woman prone to fighting
delinquent girl
delinquent boy
cool guy
cool girl
gangster
wild girl
wild boy

Please let me know and please list as many slang terms and expressions as possible. Thank you.

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Additions to thread-Reply to all posters

Postby Mavericker » 2007-09-03, 4:11

I'd like to add the following terms to the list of translations I'd like slang for:

tough guy
guy prone to fighting

Please list as many Danish slang terms and expressions as possible. Thank you. :D

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-09-06, 1:20

Hello. Some slang terms I've seen used for "tough girl" and "tomboy" are:

en strid sild

"en knaldhård sild"

en høj kaliber pige
en pige med fødderne på jorden
en fornuftig pige
en hårdfør pige
en knaldhård pige


drengetøs (wild girl)
drengepige (a tomboy)

Is there a shorter way to say,

"en pige med fødderne på jorden"

Can I also use terms like "hard pige", "wild pige" and "toffe pige"?

Does anyone know of any others?

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-09-09, 3:47

What are Danish slangs for "tough guy" besides "farlig fyr", "børste", "hård børste", "bisse", "skrap fyr", "hård fyr", "barsk fyr" and "hård negl".

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-09-27, 23:07

Hello. Is there someone here who speaks Dansih who can please help me out with translation requests?

nbo
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Postby nbo » 2007-09-28, 4:46

Danish is my native language, but I haven't responded before now, because you don't use those kind of words anymore. Those words you've on your list has been used, a long time ago. Like, if you're seeing movies (from 50-70) then you can see those words being used, but not anymore.

You usually don't call people like: "He is a 'tough guy'," but instead you're saying something like "He is tough." We're generally using adjectives to describe a person, and not titles, like "børste," etc.

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-09-28, 20:33

Oranen wrote:Danish is my native language, but I haven't responded before now, because you don't use those kind of words anymore. Those words you've on your list has been used, a long time ago. Like, if you're seeing movies (from 50-70) then you can see those words being used, but not anymore.

You usually don't call people like: "He is a 'tough guy'," but instead you're saying something like "He is tough." We're generally using adjectives to describe a person, and not titles, like "børste," etc.

Do you use any other words/expressions on the list?

nbo
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Joined: 2007-08-19, 12:46

Postby nbo » 2007-09-29, 6:32

I'm actually not using any of the words on your list, and I never had. There's probably someone who does it, I'd think the older generation does, but I'm not sure.

For some reason, we don't really use slang, and titles about persons. If we use anything, then it's adjectives like I said in my last post.

When I'm thinking of it, there's some words, but it's only harsh word, meant to harm others that's being used. I don't know if it's words like that you're searching for or not. Also, you sometimes call people after what they're listening to of music.

Let's look on some of the music-terms to describe people.

hiphopper - Somebody who listen to hip-hop music, and wearing baggy clothes, etc.

gangsta - We're using the English word in Danish as well, though the ending "-er" is replaced with "-a" It's usually people who tends to use bling bling, and listening to hardcore-rap, etc.

There's other as well...

Let's look on some of the harsh words to describe people.

spasser - This is used, if you dislike someone. The word is comming from "spastisk" (spasticity) which is a medical condition. It is commonly used, but only by the younger generation, especially teenagers.

mongol - Same as above, but the word referrers to "mongolisme" (down syndrome) Also commonly used, but mostly by the younger generation.

idiot - A loanword from English (idiot)

taber - English equivalent is "loser."

There's other as well...

I don't think it was what you were looking for, but I gave it a try. I hope was!

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Reply to Oranen

Postby Mavericker » 2007-10-01, 22:46

Oranen wrote:I'm actually not using any of the words on your list, and I never had. There's probably someone who does it, I'd think the older generation does, but I'm not sure.

For some reason, we don't really use slang, and titles about persons. If we use anything, then it's adjectives like I said in my last post.

When I'm thinking of it, there's some words, but it's only harsh word, meant to harm others that's being used. I don't know if it's words like that you're searching for or not. Also, you sometimes call people after what they're listening to of music.

Let's look on some of the music-terms to describe people.

hiphopper - Somebody who listen to hip-hop music, and wearing baggy clothes, etc.

gangsta - We're using the English word in Danish as well, though the ending "-er" is replaced with "-a" It's usually people who tends to use bling bling, and listening to hardcore-rap, etc.

There's other as well...

Let's look on some of the harsh words to describe people.

spasser - This is used, if you dislike someone. The word is comming from "spastisk" (spasticity) which is a medical condition. It is commonly used, but only by the younger generation, especially teenagers.

mongol - Same as above, but the word referrers to "mongolisme" (down syndrome) Also commonly used, but mostly by the younger generation.

idiot - A loanword from English (idiot)

taber - English equivalent is "loser."

There's other as well...

I don't think it was what you were looking for, but I gave it a try. I hope was!


He Oranen-thank you for responding. I went elsewhere and was told:


Here are some suggestions:
tough guy = rå fyr, sej fyr, hård negl (hard as nails)
tough girl = sej pige, sej tøs, sej kælling
tough woman = barsk dame, barsk kælling, hård kælling
strong guy = stærk fyr, kraftkarl
strong girl = stærk pige or tøs
strong woman = stærk kvinde, stærk kælling (strong bitch)
guy prone to fighting= slagsbroder (brawlingbro (-ther)
girl prone to fighting = rivejern (grater)
cool guy = sej fyr, cool fyr
cool girl = sej pige ( or tøs), cool tøs or pige
gangster = bandit, gangster
punk = gadedreng
delinquent boy = småkriminel fyr
delinquent girl = småkriminel tøs

Tomboy - "vildbasse"

wild girl = vildbasse
wild guy = vildbasse
powerfully-built male = kraftkarl, muskelbundt (bunch of muscles)
powerfully-built female? = muskelbundt (is useable)

" rå pige/tøs/kælling" or "hård pige/tøs" for "tough girl"

nbo
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Joined: 2007-08-19, 12:46

Postby nbo » 2007-10-02, 4:39

I would say those are right, and fits the English ones pretty good. But I just want you to know, that those slangs aren't used much anymore.

Anyways, I would say those are fine. :-)

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-10-03, 1:11

Oranen wrote:I would say those are right, and fits the English ones pretty good. But I just want you to know, that those slangs aren't used much anymore.

Anyways, I would say those are fine. :-)


Hello and thank you for responding. The terms I'm looking for don't have to be current. Are there any other members here who can help me out with my questions?

Mavericker
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Reply to Oranen

Postby Mavericker » 2007-10-04, 21:49

Hello Oranen. Do you have any friends here I can contact who can help me out with this thread?

nbo
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Joined: 2007-08-19, 12:46

Postby nbo » 2007-10-05, 4:44

No, sorry. I'm pretty new here myself.

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Postby Mavericker » 2007-10-06, 9:30

Hello. Is there someone here who speaks Danish who can help me out with my Danish slang translations?


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