Self-teaching Arabic

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nemurenai
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Self-teaching Arabic

Postby nemurenai » 2014-06-10, 3:29

Hey,

I'm planing to teach myself Arabic, and I'd like to know if anyone can recommend a course that teaches both Egyptian Arabic and Modern Standard Arabic. All the ones I've looked at so far that do this (like Al-Kitaab) are either not suitable for self-study, or don't seem to be very favourably reviewed :hmm:

Can anyone recommend anything?

Thanks.

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Michael
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Michael » 2014-06-10, 4:53

nemurenai wrote:Hey,

I'm planing to teach myself Arabic, and I'd like to know if anyone can recommend a course that teaches both Egyptian Arabic and Modern Standard Arabic. All the ones I've looked at so far that do this (like Al-Kitaab) are either not suitable for self-study, or don't seem to be very favourably reviewed :hmm:

Can anyone recommend anything?

Thanks.

I would personally recommend Living Language: Ultimate Arabic, whether or not product reviews for it may be flattering. Half of the book is devoted to MSA, and the other half delves into the basics of 5 major dialects, including Egyptian. The only thing I don't like about it is that the vocabulary seems to have been lazily copy-and-pasted from the dialogues, and not listed in dictionary form, but that's a rather trivial matter.

I just read the reviews for this book on Amazon, and all I can say in response is that, besides the above complaint, those issues don't seem to be a problem for me.
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Ser » 2014-06-10, 15:39

I found J. A. Haywood and H. M. Nahmad's A New Arabic Grammar of the Written Language (1999) to be a very good textbook for Modern Standard Arabic. It says "grammar" but it's really a very long and complete textbook—it even has exercises after every chapter. :P (It says it's out of stock, but maybe you can find it in a library or the like.) You can also get a hold of the key to the exercises.

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Michael » 2014-06-10, 16:06

But he's looking for a textbook that teaches both MSA and ECA.
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Ser » 2014-06-10, 21:08

There's always the possibility of using separate books. :) Kullu Tamām for Egyptian Arabic, along with A New Arabic Grammar of the Written Language for Standard Arabic.

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby księżycowy » 2014-06-10, 21:12

Yeah, Living Language: Arabic is the only one that I can think of that teaches MSA and some basics of a few dialects. Other than that, I can only think of separate books that either teach Egyptian Arabic or MSA.

For separate books, I second Kullu Tamam for Egyptian. I like Standard Arabic by Schultz for MSA myself.

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Meera » 2014-06-10, 22:56

The only textbooks I can think of that teaches MSA and Egyptian together are Al-Kitaab and Living Language. And Living Language is out of print and only has very basic Egyptian lessons. I think the best way to go is to get two separate books. For Egyptian Kullu Tamam and Colloquial are pretty good.
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby nemurenai » 2014-06-11, 14:50

Thanks for the responses so far, guys.

So, if I were to use two separate textbooks for MSA and Egyptian, would these be used at the same time, or would you start with MSA and then go onto Egyptian once you've attained a decent level? Or does this depend on the two books you're using?

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby księżycowy » 2014-06-11, 15:25

It would depend on which textbook you used for Egyptian. Most do assume some knowledge of MSA, but a few don't. Kullu Tamam is one of the few that doesn't.

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby nemurenai » 2014-06-11, 21:53

I've read (in quite a few places) that Kullu Tamam has a lot of errors. Have these been a great hindrance to anyone who's used it?

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby księżycowy » 2014-06-12, 20:57

There is also Kalaam Gamiil, which consists of two volumes. It does assume some knowledge of MSA.

Out of the two, I do like Kalaam Gamiil better, but I don't take Kullu Tamam to be that much worse. Then again, this is the first I'm hearing about any typos. :hmm:

Another difference is that Kullu Tamam uses transcription throughout, were as Kalaam Gamiil uses the Arabic script with occasional transcription for tricky spots.

Most dialect courses do use transcription only however.

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby LadyDi » 2014-09-29, 19:47

I would like to learn Arabic as well. I already started to learn the alphabet. Can someone recommend me how to proceed with learning? What is the most effective method in learning to SPEAK a language?

I need a learning partner who is either fluent or a native, if someone could help me I will be pleased.

Thank you very much!

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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Meera » 2014-10-01, 17:58

LadyDi wrote:I would like to learn Arabic as well. I already started to learn the alphabet. Can someone recommend me how to proceed with learning? What is the most effective method in learning to SPEAK a language?

I need a learning partner who is either fluent or a native, if someone could help me I will be pleased.

Thank you very much!


Hey LadyDi, it depends on which Arabic you want to learn. If you only want to speak you could try Pimsleur, I don't like Pimsleur but it is good for speaking I think. But it really depends on which Arabic you want to learn.
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby Zireael » 2014-11-09, 14:17

LadyDi wrote:I would like to learn Arabic as well. I already started to learn the alphabet. Can someone recommend me how to proceed with learning? What is the most effective method in learning to SPEAK a language?

I need a learning partner who is either fluent or a native, if someone could help me I will be pleased.

Thank you very much!


It would be best if you found an Arabic native speaker to tutor you - that's how I started.

After two years, I've had roughly 1,5 year of everyday contact with Arabic Erasmus exchange students here in Poland, so even when the holidays rolled around, I just kept in touch via FB.
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Re: Self-teaching Arabic

Postby arabeasy » 2015-04-29, 21:18

LadyDi wrote:I would like to learn Arabic as well. I already started to learn the alphabet. Can someone recommend me how to proceed with learning? What is the most effective method in learning to SPEAK a language?

I need a learning partner who is either fluent or a native, if someone could help me I will be pleased.

Thank you very much!


a tutor or language exchange partner is good, and using latin letters to memorize vocab more easily. check out http://arabeasy.net


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