Arabic learning resources

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Meera
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2011-08-10, 22:14

Hannahanneke wrote:http://en.mo3jam.com/

a user-generated dictionary of colloquial Arabic (only), not excellent, an explanation is sometimes absent, but good to keep your colloquial vocabulary fresh in mind



OMG! this site is absoutly awesome! Thanks :D
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Ser » 2011-08-11, 2:38

''' wrote:is there an online list of roots?
You're asking for a dictionary then.
Hannahanneke wrote:http://en.mo3jam.com/

a user-generated dictionary of colloquial Arabic (only), not excellent, an explanation is sometimes absent, but good to keep your colloquial vocabulary fresh in mind
I had already posted that one two years ago, check the first page...

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2011-08-22, 6:10

http://afl.sakhr.com//


This site is really good
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Hannahanneke » 2011-08-22, 6:54

Thanks Meera! The dialogues can help me to improve my informal fouS7a!

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby eskandar » 2011-12-31, 19:08

A Hundred and One Rules - A Short Reference for Arabic Syntactic, Morphological & Phonological Rules for Novice & Intermediate Levels of Proficiency (.doc format, very good resource)
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby ecoimp1211 » 2012-01-13, 10:10

There is audio books for arabic learning.And there is a site named "http://www.madinaharabic.com/"
which is good to teach araby.www.madinaharabic.net you can visit this also..
impresoras cd
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby arabiconline » 2012-02-11, 12:11

There is this new and free online course of Modern Standard Arabic for complete beginners funded by the EU. The course is now available and it provides:

1. user-friendly and clearly organised units of learning that cover reading, listening, speaking and writing in Arabic;
2. integrated learning activities promoting relevant intercultural awareness;
3. integrated voice recording facilities;
4. permanent online availability;
5. and English, German, Italian, Lithuanian and Portuguese versions.

Check out the links, I assure you this is not a spam:
Arabic Online course: http://www.arabiconline.eu/
Arabic Online promotional video: http://youtube/flcVUaIbNEU
Arabic Online facebook group & apps: http://www.facebook.com/arabiconline


Good luck and have fun!

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Anatoli » 2012-02-16, 21:41

I have submitted this Arabic resource but it hasn't appeared yet.

http://arabic.euronews.net/

It has news in Arabic with scripts matching what is said - a thing often sought by language learners.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2012-02-18, 7:52

Anatoli wrote:I have submitted this Arabic resource but it hasn't appeared yet.

http://arabic.euronews.net/

It has news in Arabic with scripts matching what is said - a thing often sought by language learners.


This is awesome. thanks!
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2012-02-23, 3:21

Arabic Online
http://www.arabiconline.eu/index.php/learn-arabic/
I just found this today, if you a begginner this will be a great start in Arabic.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2012-03-09, 21:12

Guys I wanna warn you, do not get the third eddition to al-kitaab. It's horrible.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Ser » 2012-03-10, 5:49

Saying "it's horrible" doesn't help at all unless you tell us why you think it's horrible.

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby YngNghymru » 2012-03-10, 6:35

My experiences of al-Kitaab have not been great. The grammar sections are patronising and slow, although this might just be me - I prefer to get stuck in with grammar, whilst obviously most courses prefer to introduce them slowly. The vocab introduced includes numerous useful words, but also lots of considerably LESS useful words - and words like 'humidity' and 'study grant' are taught long before e.g. the colours. The dialect section is aimed at improving comprehension rather than actually teaching you anything, which is annoying but I suppose understandable to some extent and the stories which are supposed to motivate you, I assume, are just profoundly depressing. It also presupposes considerable knowledge from Alif Baa, which we didn't do, although this is more a problem with our department than anything else I would imagine.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Ser » 2012-03-10, 6:49

YngNghymru wrote:My experiences of al-Kitaab have not been great. The grammar sections are patronising and slow, although this might just be me
Still, how could you feel patronized by a grammar section? :hmm: (I've never used al-Kitaab myself.)
I prefer to get stuck in with grammar, whilst obviously most courses prefer to introduce them slowly.
Me too, but not many colleges have courses that stuff you with grammar. You do generally need to look for grammars by yourself. (Though I guess I can assume you've already done that.)
The vocab introduced includes numerous useful words, but also lots of considerably LESS useful words - and words like 'humidity' and 'study grant' are taught long before e.g. the colours.
Hmm... "Humidity" and "study grant" don't look too bad to me actually, and I think it's understandable they'd teach the colours late depending on how they're teaching case declensions. If they're teaching diptotes late (as I think it's usually done), then it's a must since the singulars of colours are diptotes.

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2012-03-10, 19:07

Serafín wrote:Saying "it's horrible" doesn't help at all unless you tell us why you think it's horrible.


I don't even know where to start. We spent two semesters of Alf Baa (which was riddiculious but people in the class needed to go slower so it's okay because its a whole new alphabet) and alf baa is excellent if you don't know the script but the al-kitaab is painful. Even our professor is considering not using in her next classes. The jump from Alf baa to al-kitaab is huge, for me personally it wasn't a problem because I studied some Arabic on my own, but everyone in my class is compleatly lost. The exercises in it makes you do things that havent been taught yet. For example in the first chapter it tells you how to verb conjugations but doesn't teach word order, so when the students translate it is all wrong. The videos and things on the dvd are nice but are all labeled wrong for example there are two main charecters, Maha whos Egyptian and Nasreen whos Syrian, but on the dvd the syrian files are under Maha's name and Egyptian under Nasreen. Also to put any of the mp3's on an mp3 player/ipod you would have to convert them because the give them all in movie file. To use the internet acess you have to pay another 25 dollars and the book is seventy which is also okay but the book doesn't advertise this. My Egyptian teacher has told us some of the Egyptian phrases used aren't right, although she is from Alexandria so it could just be a dialect difference. The grammar explantions are bad too, it hardly covers anything, so far there has been no explantion on the root system. The biggest problem I noticed though is the fact it gives you exercises hasn't been taught yet, my professor was thinking the authors might of done it on purpose to learn from mistakes but it has been highly stressful for everyone. The online content and the fact in includes dialects and has videos is a huge plus but if you try to learn Arabic on your own i wouldn't suggest it. I really prefer ultimate arabic, living arabic and mastering arabic over this one. But I do know there are some people who love al-kitaab so I guess it depends what kind of style you like.

Edit: I would also like to add that although my proffesor is very sweet and really helpful, she isn't the best language professor so it might not be entirely the books fault :P
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby YngNghymru » 2012-03-10, 23:13

Serafín wrote:Hmm... "Humidity" and "study grant" don't look too bad to me actually, and I think it's understandable they'd teach the colours late depending on how they're teaching case declensions. If they're teaching diptotes late (as I think it's usually done), then it's a must since the singulars of colours are diptotes.


They don't introduce diptotes in this book, as I understand it; cases only get a very brief overview. They do introduce 'black' and 'white' reasonably early, and frequently introduce words with features which are only explained later (e.g. ليس long before they discuss hollow verbs), so it's obviously not that they're worried about this sort of thing.

Incidentally, our teacher has also mentioned that there are a lot of unidiomatic phrasings in the book; sometimes they are understandable and are probably used in order to illustrate grammar points without complication, or whatever, but more often they seem to take the form of literal translations from English, such as بيأتم يدخلون معًا as a euphemism for, you know, courting or whatever you want to call it.

Still, how could you feel patronized by a grammar section? :hmm: (I've never used al-Kitaab myself.)


It's just very, very simplified. If you know anything whatsoever about linguistics, it can become painful. But this applies generally to courses, I would think.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Ser » 2012-03-10, 23:42

YngNghymru wrote:They don't introduce diptotes in this book, as I understand it; cases only get a very brief overview. They do introduce 'black' and 'white' reasonably early,
Umm... What? Then how do they even form sentences with them? They just avoid using them in the indefinite acusative? I can't imagine them not teaching you that they don't take the ـًا ending...
and frequently introduce words with features which are only explained later (e.g. ليس long before they discuss hollow verbs)
But that's okay, the conjugation of ليس is very specific to this verb, while you can teach the generalities of hollow verbs later (i.e. they don't apply to ليس anyway).
بيأتم يدخلون معًا
How... do you even pronounce that?

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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby Meera » 2012-03-11, 0:11

YngNghymru wrote:
They don't introduce diptotes in this book, as I understand it; cases only get a very brief overview. They do introduce 'black' and 'white' reasonably early, and frequently introduce words with features which are only explained later (e.g. ليس long before they discuss hollow verbs), so it's obviously not that they're worried about this sort of thing.

Incidentally, our teacher has also mentioned that there are a lot of unidiomatic phrasings in the book; sometimes they are understandable and are probably used in order to illustrate grammar points without complication, or whatever, but more often they seem to take the form of literal translations from English, such as بيأتم يدخلون معًا as a euphemism for, you know, courting or whatever you want to call it.



It's just very, very simplified. If you know anything whatsoever about linguistics, it can become painful. But this applies generally to courses, I would think.


I agree the grammar sections are really bad, I don't know anything about lingustics but they way the explain it, it's just not engough information. The book feels so waterdowned to me, they don't really explain anything.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby YngNghymru » 2012-03-11, 11:26

Serafín wrote:Umm... What? Then how do they even form sentences with them? They just avoid using them in the indefinite acusative? I can't imagine them not teaching you that they don't take the ـًا ending...


Pretty much! I don't think they avoid using them, they just ignore the distinction and neglect to explain why you might use nunation on a given noun or not. They quite frequently do things like saying, and this is a genuine example, 'pick one out of -uun and -iin, the differences will be explained later.' 'Later' isn't just one or two chapters, either; my class (although not me, since I changed subjects) has been studying this book for most of the year and are on chapter 16 but still haven't reached the section on cases. The case system is only discussed - and then comparatively briefly - after verb forms and weak verbs have been discussed in what is comparatively great detail.

]But that's okay, the conjugation of ليس is very specific to this verb, while you can teach the generalities of hollow verbs later (i.e. they don't apply to ليس anyway).


Not really... I mean its lack of imperfect forms, okay, but the distribution of vowel lengths etc is completely typical of a hollow verb. I suppose that's a reasonable justification, though, but it's not JUST ليس - they often introduce the verbs long before they explain how to conjugate them fully. The same applies to lots of things - passive forms, superlatives, and so on - in that they introduce individual forms several chapters before they discuss generalities. I suppose this might be to some extent necessary for the listening exercises - i.e. you need to know what أكثر or أحسن mean a while before you necessarily need to know how to form superlatives generally - but it's still quite annoying.

How... do you even pronounce that?


That was insanely typoed, I meant بدؤوا يدخلون معا (or the 2pl equivalent, I'm not sure which I was actually aiming for). The terrors of rapid posting without an Arabic keyboard.
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Re: Arabic learning resources

Postby safofoh » 2012-04-21, 19:02

Learning Arabic as a Foreign Language With a Studied Plan.
Don't miss this site out. It's offering free lessons.


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