Share Some Arabic Music

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby voron » 2017-07-07, 15:05

voron wrote:To me it looks cryptic.

Actually on the second thought, the first stanza looks more Kurdish than Arabic. I can recognize some words:
De warni warni warni de warni, warni warni
De warni warni warni, waren delani wasmar
Asmare be gawri nadem de warni, warni warni
Asmare be gawri nadem waren delani wasmar
Asmare be gawri nadem de warni, warni warni
Asmare be gawri nadem waren delani wasmar

wara (spelt were) is come!
de is an emphatic particle ("do come!")
delal is beautiful
asmar (spelt esmer) is black (-haired)
(so the first two lines are "come here, my beautiful black-haired")

Asmare be gawri
be is a prefix that means "without"
gawr is probably "gewr", grey
so "asmare be gawri" is "black-haired without any greyness"
nadem looks too much like "nadim", which is "I don't give" (or perhaps it's another verb but it looks like a conjugated Kurdish verb)
etc

So yeah this stanza is most likely in Kurdish. But the subsequent ones are in Arabic.
Last edited by voron on 2017-07-07, 15:17, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-07, 15:16

voron wrote:Here are the romanized lyrics:
http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/%D8%B9%D9% ... arni_Warni
To me it looks cryptic. It kinda looks Arabic, but that's all I can say. I love the song anyway. :)


Thanks! That actually helps a lot. I understand a lot of the song now :D it's Romanised very strangely and it's not a typical dialect either.

Thanks for your comments! Why do you think it can a Bedouin dialect, because of the guy's clothes and style?


Nah, it just sounds Bedouin. It's so different to anything else in the entire Levant except for Bedouin dialects. Bedouins the world over seem to have surprisingly similar dialects.

wiki wrote:Omar Souleyman is a musician from the village of Tell Tamer[1][2] near the city of Ra's al-'Ayn in the northeastern region of Syria.


Ahuh! He's from an Assyrian village :D Hasakah is historically very Assyrian, which means that it's now populated by a lot of Kurds like the other Assyrian regions in Iran, Turkey and Iraq. And seeing as it's near the Iraqi and Turkish Assyrian regions (much more heavily populated by Kurds, Turks and Arabs after the Assyrian genocide and other events in Syria and Iraq), it makes a lot of sense that he's a mix of Kurdish and Arab. He may even have Assyrian in him :hmm:

The dialects in these parts of Syria (North Mesopotamian or Iraqi) is often a transitional dialect between Iraqi and Syrian Levantine.

If you look at this map, you can see that there are four main dialect groups in Syria: Iraqi, North Mesopotamian, Najdi and Levantine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Mes ... alects.svg

Maybe this explains why Saria elSawas and this guy sound like a mix of Bedouin/Iraqi? I don't know anymore :rotfl:

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby Meera » 2017-07-07, 18:04

n8an wrote:
Meera wrote:
I posted this video a long time ago, but is this the same Saria?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=br4Gs-AfVkA


Yup, same one!

You get a lot of groans when you tell people you listen to her music :rotfl:


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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-07, 19:35

voron wrote:What does the title of the song "warni" mean? I have a wild guess that it's a melt of Kurdish "were" (come) and the Arabic ending "-ni" (come to me), but wouldn't it be too mad to merge things this way?

Apparently that's exactly what it means - English translation of the lyrics here.
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby voron » 2017-07-07, 19:55

eskandar wrote:Apparently that's exactly what it means - English translation of the lyrics here.

Then I was probably right that there is a merge of Kurdish and Arabic morphemes here. I want to make a trip to those lands one day and just listen to people speak -- it must be a crazy mix.

Here is a catchy disco song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqRsRlftQ84

The funniest thing about it, it's titled "Te Ma Etmaje", and the first look at the title made me think it's an Indo-European language (with these "te" and "ma"), but then I found the (terribly romanized) lyrics below the video:
damaeak ma jab eayni dameik ma jab

which means smth like
"your tears didn't bring (any use)"?

Someone here suggested it's a Lybian dialect:
http://lyricstranslate.com/en/te-ma-etm ... tears.html

So, what is this "te ma etmaje", a misheard first line of the Arabic text?

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-07, 20:14

voron wrote:So, what is this "te ma etmaje", a misheard first line of the Arabic text?

That's what I would guess, too.
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-07, 21:03

Jordanian song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EOzEfnVsl0

الجمال ما بيدوم
ويمو الجمعة دايماً أشوب
والكلام البهالعيون ماله تفسير لو في معجم
والبياض اللي بهالكتاب كل مابكثر كل ما برتاح
والجفا اللي بقلبي هاد والطبع العمره ما انحب
الشمس أحلى نجوم بعد المسى ما بتتحرّك
والشباب آخرته يقوم لو غنينا ولّا لأ

والشباب بس قاعده تزقف والكواكب حولينا بتلف
من غير شمس هينا منورين ما بدنا نغرق ما بدنا نجدف

والبنات بس قاعده بتعلك خايفه أواعيها تجعلك
محلانا كيف بنلبّق محلانا را بندبّق

Aljamal ma baydum
Wimu aljum3t daymaan 'ashwab
Walkalam albahaleyun malah tafsir law fi ma3jam
Walbayad ally bahalktab kal mabkathr kl ma bartah
Waljifa ally biqalabi had walttabe aleumruh ma anhab
Alshams 'ahlaa nujum baed almasaa ma batata7rak
walshshabab akharatuh yaqum law ghanina wlla la

Walshabab bas qaeidh tazaqqaf walkawakib hawlyna bitalaf
Min ghayir shams hayinana munwrin ma badna naghrig ma badna najdif

Walbanat bas qaeidih bitaelik khayifah 'awaeiha tajeuluk
Ma7lana kayf banlabaq ma7alanaan ra badiq

Beauty doesn't last
Fridays are always hotter
and the speech in those eyes has no meaning even if in a dictionary
and the whiteness/blankness in this book, the more of it there is, the more comfortable I become
and the cruelty that is in my heart, and the instinct that has never been loved
the sun is the nicest star, after setting at night it doesn't move
and the guys will get up whether we sing or not

the guys are just clapping, and the planets circulate around us
without a sun we are brilliantly shining, we don't wanna drown, we don't wanna paddle

and the girls are just chewing, afraid of their clothes getting wrinkled
how beautiful they are, how they chose their clothes, so sweet they'll get sticky

[Not my transliteration or translation; found them online and altered the translation somewhat]

NB: شوب shoob or showb, comparative/superlative أشوب ashwab is a Levantine word meaning 'hot' (weather)
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-08, 4:47

Meera wrote:لمذا؟


This kind of music is kind of stigmatised. It's like the equivalent of country music in the US - like, a bit...lower class :? not nice to categorise things this way, but that's just how it's perceived by a lot of people.

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-08, 4:49

eskandar wrote:Jordanian song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EOzEfnVsl0

الجمال ما بيدوم
ويمو الجمعة دايماً أشوب
والكلام البهالعيون ماله تفسير لو في معجم
والبياض اللي بهالكتاب كل مابكثر كل ما برتاح
والجفا اللي بقلبي هاد والطبع العمره ما انحب
الشمس أحلى نجوم بعد المسى ما بتتحرّك
والشباب آخرته يقوم لو غنينا ولّا لأ

والشباب بس قاعده تزقف والكواكب حولينا بتلف
من غير شمس هينا منورين ما بدنا نغرق ما بدنا نجدف

والبنات بس قاعده بتعلك خايفه أواعيها تجعلك
محلانا كيف بنلبّق محلانا را بندبّق

Aljamal ma baydum
Wimu aljum3t daymaan 'ashwab
Walkalam albahaleyun malah tafsir law fi ma3jam
Walbayad ally bahalktab kal mabkathr kl ma bartah
Waljifa ally biqalabi had walttabe aleumruh ma anhab
Alshams 'ahlaa nujum baed almasaa ma batata7rak
walshshabab akharatuh yaqum law ghanina wlla la

Walshabab bas qaeidh tazaqqaf walkawakib hawlyna bitalaf
Min ghayir shams hayinana munwrin ma badna naghrig ma badna najdif

Walbanat bas qaeidih bitaelik khayifah 'awaeiha tajeuluk
Ma7lana kayf banlabaq ma7alanaan ra badiq

Beauty doesn't last
Fridays are always hotter
and the speech in those eyes has no meaning even if in a dictionary
and the whiteness/blankness in this book, the more of it there is, the more comfortable I become
and the cruelty that is in my heart, and the instinct that has never been loved
the sun is the nicest star, after setting at night it doesn't move
and the guys will get up whether we sing or not

the guys are just clapping, and the planets circulate around us
without a sun we are brilliantly shining, we don't wanna drown, we don't wanna paddle

and the girls are just chewing, afraid of their clothes getting wrinkled
how beautiful they are, how they chose their clothes, so sweet they'll get sticky

[Not my transliteration or translation; found them online and altered the translation somewhat]

NB: شوب shoob or showb, comparative/superlative أشوب ashwab is a Levantine word meaning 'hot' (weather)



Cool song! Also, Jordanian Arabic really does sound similar to Palestinian but with the ق as "g". I think there are at least 3 different dialects in Jordan so this is maybe a more rural one.

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby Meera » 2017-07-08, 17:41

n8an wrote:
Meera wrote:لمذا؟


This kind of music is kind of stigmatised. It's like the equivalent of country music in the US - like, a bit...lower class :? not nice to categorise things this way, but that's just how it's perceived by a lot of people.


Really? So she sings like folk music? I don't care I like her music. :oops:
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-08, 19:12

This genre gets referred to as شعبي (sha3bi) music, which would seem to translate as "folk music," but I think n8an's comparison to country music is a better one - Arabic "folk music" is a little different. I've definitely been teased for liking sha3bi music, but I don't care either!
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-11, 15:24

Meera wrote:
n8an wrote:
Meera wrote:لمذا؟


This kind of music is kind of stigmatised. It's like the equivalent of country music in the US - like, a bit...lower class :? not nice to categorise things this way, but that's just how it's perceived by a lot of people.


Really? So she sings like folk music? I don't care I like her music. :oops:


I'd say it's more like low-class hillbilly music :| which is unfair, but that's how a lot of people perceive it.

I like it too :lol:

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-13, 7:00

Jordanian, Yemeni, and Egyptian rap
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8iOTB818VE
Arabic lyrics + English translation here
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-16, 15:22

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zApafuoIuNw

Waleed al Shami - We7id 7elo

This song is supposed to be in the Mosul Arabic dialect (as opposed to most Iraqi songs which are in Baghdadi Arabic) in celebration of Iraq regaining control of Mosul.

My Iraqi friend said that it's not a "real" Moslawi song because Waleed isn't Moslawi - the lyrics are in "easy" Moslawi.

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby voron » 2017-07-17, 14:19

eskandar wrote:Jordanian, Yemeni, and Egyptian rap

I can definitely tell that the first girl Mira is Jordanian, and I think the second guy too. (Although he pronounces his ق as [q]. Or is it [g]? I think I hear [q] in قائدة and [g] in قصة and حق).

What are the tell-tales of a Yemeni dialect? How do they pronounce their ق and ج? What are the most distinguishing grammar differences? How do they construct negation and the present tense?

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-17, 15:06

voron wrote:What are the tell-tales of a Yemeni dialect? How do they pronounce their ق and ج? What are the most distinguishing grammar differences? How do they construct negation and the present tense?


Yemeni is extremely different to Khaleeji. It's probably up there with Moroccan and Algerian in terms of difficulty for speakers of other dialects.

As far as I know, they use q for ق and g for ج (like Egyptian), but there are dialects in Yemen which probably don't do that. They also have something with ش or س, from what I remember.

Let me look at Wiki

Grammatically all Tihami dialects also share the unusual feature of replacing the definite article (al-) with the prefix (am-). The future tense, much like the dialects surrounding Sana'a, is indicated with the prefix (š-), for all persons, e.g. šabūk am-sūq "I will go to the Souq". Some Tihami dialects, such as that spoken in al Hudaydah, are otherwise fairly similar to other Yemeni dialects in grammar and syntax, differing mainly in vocabulary, while others can be so far from any other Arabic dialect that they are practically incomprehensible even to other Yemenis.


Yup :doggy: so hard to understand.

Here we go, here's a video of Sanaani Arabic. This is actually MUCH easier to understand than the other Yemenis I've heard.

https://youtu.be/vQs1ZMznIr0?list=PLUn2PLxMGLCFMhv38EHroGTWCIoTpfja4

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby n8an » 2017-07-18, 15:09

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eb10bwERnwk



I literally forgot about Ruwaida Attiyeh years ago, but this song came on my shuffle and I remembered how beautiful her voice is :<3:

She sounds a tiny bit like Nawal elZoghbe.

This song is really nice :yep:

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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-18, 20:18

voron wrote:I can definitely tell that the first girl Mira is Jordanian, and I think the second guy too. (Although he pronounces his ق as [q]. Or is it [g]? I think I hear [q] in قائدة and [g] in قصة and حق).

Exactly. This happens a lot in Arabic dialects. "Everyday" ordinary words with ق are pronounced the local way ([g] in this case) whereas words that are more formal (eg. words borrowed into colloquial from MSA) are pronounced with [q]. You can compare in any dialect how they say the word قلب with قرآن - the ق in the former could be a glottal stop, a [g], a [k], or whatever, but in the latter it's almost certainly going to be [q].
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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby Limagne » 2017-07-21, 13:59


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Re: Share Some Arabic Music

Postby eskandar » 2017-07-22, 20:41

I found a version of the song "Dommak" that n8an posted with English subtitles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY28u4eeCo4
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