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Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-06-09, 8:03
by Saim
So I've been going through Glossika Arabic (Modern Standard) over the last couple of days and one of the things that struck me was the use of enclitic forms like إنّه for the copula instead of the subject pronouns I would have expected (in this case هو). Does this exist in vernacular varieties as well? Is there any difference between, say, إنّه جائع and هو جائع in MSA usage?

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-06-13, 20:04
by voron
Saim wrote:Is there any difference between, say, إنّه جائع and هو جائع in MSA usage?

I bet you know already that ّإن is a particle of assertion and it's translated as "truly" or "indeed". It is used a lot in Quran. For example, in sura al-Kawthar (108:1)
إِنَّا أَعْطَيْنَاكَ الْكَوْثَرَ
Indeed, we have given you al-Kawthar.

إنّه جائع should be translated as "He is truly hungry". I don't know how stylistically relevant it is.

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-07-02, 15:28
by Meera
vijayjohn wrote:I have no familiarity with either of them (all I have for Egyptian Arabic is the Lonely Planet phrasebook :lol:), but I just looked a bit online and found that people seem to agree that Kalaam Gamiil is a more comprehensive course (however, it assumes that you have a pretty solid background in MSA). Kullu Tamam has an average rating of 3.5 stars on Goodreads. Somebody said there that it has a lot of mistakes, and someone on Amazon said it's good if you're more comfortable reading transliterations in Roman script than in Arabic script. I think I'd probably go with Kalaam Gamiil. Of course, this is just my guess, though. :)


Thanks Vijay! I went with Kalaam Gamiil and really like so far.

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-08-14, 12:48
by Talha
Where in the Arabic world is أبزن the word for "sink"?

I have always known مغسل and حوض.

I found it in this cute children's book that the publishers emailed me:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-5DxN ... JHckk/view

Thanks for sharing any insights!

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-08-14, 12:54
by Talha
Likewise Schulz gives مخزن along with محل and دكان for "shop". The last two I'm familiar with but the first I've always thought of as "warehouse" or "storage".

I guess these terms differ from region to region.

Please advise.

شكرا

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-09-26, 6:26
by vijayjohn
Talha wrote:Where in the Arabic world is أبزن the word for "sink"?

Maybe Saudi Arabia? I found that word here, where it's apparently used for 'sink' (or maybe I got that wrong? I found that via this image, which I found by looking for "أبزن sink" without quotes in Google Images).
Talha wrote:Likewise Schulz gives مخزن along with محل and دكان for "shop". The last two I'm familiar with but the first I've always thought of as "warehouse" or "storage".

I guess these terms differ from region to region.

Either that or these are just not the meanings of these words that people usually associate with them, I guess. I mean, these meanings aren't all that distant from each other anyway, and some European languages actually got their word for 'shop' from مخزن. I think this might also be a Saudi usage (not necessarily limited to Saudi Arabia).

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-10-25, 18:03
by Luís
What kind of Arabic does Makan 33 use? (live feed here). Is it just MSA or there's stuff in Levantine Arabic as well?

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-10-25, 18:37
by eskandar
I just watched for a minute and it seemed to be in the middle of a soap opera. They were speaking Levantine colloquial and the subtitles were in MSA.

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-11-10, 16:05
by Saim

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-11-10, 16:15
by voron
Saim wrote:What is the meaning of خصم and اللدود in this sentence?

I didn't know these words but their use in this sentence is clear from the dictionary, no? I'm looking up on aratools.com:
خصم - adversary
اللدود - mortal

خصم السعودية اللدود - the mortal rival of Saudi Arabia (or, as Google Translate translates it, the arch-rival).

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2017-11-10, 16:19
by Saim
I got confused because I read السعودية as a noun (i.e. "Saudi Arabia", and Google gave اللدود on its own as "the arch" (which made me think of the physical object), and I read خصم as a verb (to defeat, subtract); so "he defeated Saudi Arabia the arch". :lol: Thanks.

ما معنى (جامع الأعقاب)؟

Posted: 2018-01-14, 10:06
by Talha
Hey guys, I'm reading Naguib Mahfouz's novel al-Liss wal-Kilab ("The Thief and the Dogs"). There is an expression he uses جامع الأعقاب. In the Trevor Le Gassick et al translation it is translated as "cigarette-butt cadger". Can anyone shed any light on the term?

WhatsApp Image 2018-01-07 at 15.10.06.jpeg

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-01-31, 4:04
by vijayjohn
I don't know, but could it mean something like "cigarette butt collector"?

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-03-13, 14:28
by księżycowy
[I'm not sure where to put this. Feel free to move it you feel it would be better elsewhere in the Arabic subforum.]

Just in case anyone comes to this forum and hasn't seen our poll in the Hebrew forum, please check out this poll that will help us decide what to do with the Semitic languages. There have not been any proposals that directly affect Arabic but if you're interested in Semitic languages in general, or otherwise want a say, check it out!

viewtopic.php?f=34&t=52834

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-05-12, 11:46
by Talha
Hey guys,

I would appreciate an answer to this question. I have tons like it.

Why is the jussive of يَحْمَرُّ -> لم يَحْمَرِرْ with a kasra on that first raa` and not a fatha?

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-08-30, 14:57
by Saim
What would the vocalisation of تحدث be in the sentence عليك التحدث إلى أحد موظفي الشباك? Would it be a masdar, i.e. تَحَدُّث?

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-08-30, 16:55
by eskandar
Saim wrote:What would the vocalisation of تحدث be in the sentence عليك التحدث إلى أحد موظفي الشباك? Would it be a masdar, i.e. تَحَدُّث?

Yes, it has to be since it's definite.

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-11-04, 16:35
by france-eesti
Hi there!
It's the 1st time I post on this forum :)
I just had some... news... Actually, my grandfather died last year. But in his early life he spent a lot of years in Algeria.
Anyway, he got to learn Arabic and even literary Arabic.
So my grandmother got to tell me yesterday that the last word he ever said just before dying was "مكتوب" => Mektub
Can anyone give me a signification for that...? I think it's something like "Destiny", or "it was written"...
The "funniest" this is that I do own a book written by Paolo Coelho named "Mektub"!
Thank you! (Shukran?)

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-11-28, 4:31
by eskandar
france-eesti wrote:I just had some... news... Actually, my grandfather died last year. But in his early life he spent a lot of years in Algeria.
Anyway, he got to learn Arabic and even literary Arabic.
So my grandmother got to tell me yesterday that the last word he ever said just before dying was "مكتوب" => Mektub
Can anyone give me a signification for that...? I think it's something like "Destiny", or "it was written"...

Toutes mes condoléances. You are right, both are good translations for مكتوب . Literally it means "written," and so by extension it also means "fated, destined."

Re: Short questions

Posted: 2018-11-28, 5:46
by france-eesti
Shukran! Thanks a lot! I'm so glad I know his last word and its meaning! :partyhat:
May he rest in peace...