Short questions

Moderator: eskandar

User avatar
Massimiliano B
Posts: 1779
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
Real Name: Massimiliano Bavieri
Gender: male
Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Short questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2014-12-30, 10:36

I can't help you, loqu :(


I have a question about the preposition لِ (li). When I write it, have I to elide the alif of the article? Example: للْوَزِيرِ vs لِٱلْوَزِيرِ. I think the first is correct but I am not sure.

Thank you!

User avatar
eskandar
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 2672
Joined: 2006-12-15, 8:27
Real Name: Eskandar
Gender: male

Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2014-12-30, 11:32

Yes, you're right, you ellide the alif as in the first way you wrote it.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

User avatar
Massimiliano B
Posts: 1779
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
Real Name: Massimiliano Bavieri
Gender: male
Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Short questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2014-12-31, 9:24

Thank you, eskandar!

User avatar
Meera
Posts: 8740
Joined: 2008-05-27, 22:01
Real Name: Meera
Gender: female
Location: Philadelphia
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby Meera » 2015-01-18, 7:12

Recently for an assigment I had to read about Maurtania, so I was wondering about Hassaniya Arabic is it close to maghrebi or completely different? I tried listening to Hassaniya to see if I could hear any similaraties with maghrebi but I' not real familiar with any of the Maghrebi's so thats why I was currious. Shukran.
अहिंसा/เจ
True Love: (hi)
TAC 2017: (hi) (ja) (ko)

User avatar
eskandar
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 2672
Joined: 2006-12-15, 8:27
Real Name: Eskandar
Gender: male

Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2015-01-18, 13:30

Hassaniya Arabic is classified as a Maghrebi dialect, but from what I can tell it is pretty different from any other dialect in the family. There's a good thread on the similarities and differences at Wordreference here.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

User avatar
Meera
Posts: 8740
Joined: 2008-05-27, 22:01
Real Name: Meera
Gender: female
Location: Philadelphia
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby Meera » 2015-01-18, 19:21

Oh really interesting, thanks for the link Eskandar!
अहिंसा/เจ
True Love: (hi)
TAC 2017: (hi) (ja) (ko)

User avatar
johnklepac
Posts: 2809
Joined: 2012-12-06, 2:18
Real Name: Your Onions
Gender: male
Location: Chicago/Southwest Ohio
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby johnklepac » 2015-04-02, 4:28

What does the word ابيض mean, as a slang term? I heard it used to mean someone was either good or bad at something - I'm assuming bad, from the context. Either way, are there any more standard terms for possessing or lacking skill?

User avatar
Massimiliano B
Posts: 1779
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
Real Name: Massimiliano Bavieri
Gender: male
Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Short questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2015-04-26, 8:19

johnklepac wrote:What does the word ابيض mean, as a slang term? I heard it used to mean someone was either good or bad at something - I'm assuming bad, from the context. Either way, are there any more standard terms for possessing or lacking skill?


I've searched on Google and I've found that it means "white".

User avatar
Massimiliano B
Posts: 1779
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
Real Name: Massimiliano Bavieri
Gender: male
Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Short questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2015-04-26, 8:22

Is my translation correct?

"The employee knocked at the door and then he went in to the king"

قَرَعَ ٱلْمُوَظَّفُ ٱلْبَابَ ثُمَّ دَخَلَ إِلَ ٱلْمَلِكِ

User avatar
johnklepac
Posts: 2809
Joined: 2012-12-06, 2:18
Real Name: Your Onions
Gender: male
Location: Chicago/Southwest Ohio
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby johnklepac » 2015-05-08, 2:36

Massimiliano B wrote:
johnklepac wrote:What does the word ابيض mean, as a slang term? I heard it used to mean someone was either good or bad at something - I'm assuming bad, from the context. Either way, are there any more standard terms for possessing or lacking skill?


I've searched on Google and I've found that it means "white".

Well, literally, yeah. (For masculine singular nouns, anyway.) Eh, I'm neglecting Arabic right now anyway so it's a bit of a moot point.

User avatar
Meera
Posts: 8740
Joined: 2008-05-27, 22:01
Real Name: Meera
Gender: female
Location: Philadelphia
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby Meera » 2015-09-16, 5:43

Please help! I'm really confused on a couple of things. So I started chapter 8 in Al-Kitaab last week and we learned how to say بعد أن. However my ustaaz gave all examples of بعد using ما after it and not أن. The book says this is the way to do it in dialect, but ustaaz is saying it is MSA, which way is correct?
अहिंसा/เจ
True Love: (hi)
TAC 2017: (hi) (ja) (ko)

User avatar
Ser
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 7607
Joined: 2008-08-14, 2:55
Real Name: Renato
Gender: male
Location: Most Beautiful Vancouver / 醉美溫哥華
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Short questions

Postby Ser » 2015-09-22, 6:49

Standard Arabic has a lot of conjunctions ending in -maa (for example 7iinamaa at the time when, 3indamaa when, mithlamaa as, kullamaa the more...the more), but ba3damaa is pretty much dialect as far as I know.

Perhaps your 2ustaadh means to say that ba3damaa isn't considered vulgar, and it's acceptable in a wider number of registers.

User avatar
Meera
Posts: 8740
Joined: 2008-05-27, 22:01
Real Name: Meera
Gender: female
Location: Philadelphia
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby Meera » 2015-11-08, 6:27

Shukran ya serefin
अहिंसा/เจ
True Love: (hi)
TAC 2017: (hi) (ja) (ko)

הענט

Re: Short questions

Postby הענט » 2016-10-13, 12:47

I have an old book on Arabic (classical) by Manassewitsch from the Austria-Hungary era and he classifies the dialects into four forms. Hejaz, Syrian, Egyptian and Maghrebi. Is it accurate enough? I just met two guys. One from Egypt and one from Tunisia and they understand each other just fine.

User avatar
eskandar
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 2672
Joined: 2006-12-15, 8:27
Real Name: Eskandar
Gender: male

Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2016-10-13, 17:18

Since these classifications are ultimately arbitrary to some extent, it just depends on how specific you want to get. You could go even more general and broadly group Arabic dialects into "Eastern" and "Western." More commonly, the major dialect groups are identified as Maghrebi, Egyptian, Levantine, and Gulf. You can get more specific than that, too. Hejazi Arabic is significantly different from the Gulf dialects, though...

As for Tunisian and Egyptian: it's hard to generalize without knowing how they were speaking. Did they speak to each other in their respective dialects, or, more likely, in a kind of lugha bayDa where they water down the more distinctive features of their dialects to make their Arabic more intelligible? Or perhaps the Tunisian, like many Arabs from the Maghreb and elsewhere, was familiar with Egyptian Arabic and able to speak it? Or maybe they spoke to each other in standard Arabic? These are all fairly likely possibilities. Tunisian Arabic is the most intelligible of the Maghrebi dialects for a speaker of a more Eastern dialect like Egyptian, but it's still very different.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

veljko.vel
Posts: 1
Joined: 2016-10-21, 1:50
Real Name: Veljko velickovic
Gender: male

Re: Short questions

Postby veljko.vel » 2016-10-21, 2:07

Hello, can somebody help me and clarify what's been written on a pic below. I understand most of it, but handwriting is illegible at same places and it's really giving me hard time. Could someone who is able to understand it type in this post?
Thanks

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B6ABIsflN7OUeENZNVZ6b256X3VaSUVMNTJ4bkdWUlVsbVJV

User avatar
Meera
Posts: 8740
Joined: 2008-05-27, 22:01
Real Name: Meera
Gender: female
Location: Philadelphia
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby Meera » 2017-02-20, 15:50

Hey all, I was wondering does anyone have any experience with Kullu Tamam or Kalam Gamil? I want to get a good textbook for Masri and wondering which one is better out of these two? Shukran.
अहिंसा/เจ
True Love: (hi)
TAC 2017: (hi) (ja) (ko)

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 22890
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Short questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-05, 5:37

I have no familiarity with either of them (all I have for Egyptian Arabic is the Lonely Planet phrasebook :lol:), but I just looked a bit online and found that people seem to agree that Kalaam Gamiil is a more comprehensive course (however, it assumes that you have a pretty solid background in MSA). Kullu Tamam has an average rating of 3.5 stars on Goodreads. Somebody said there that it has a lot of mistakes, and someone on Amazon said it's good if you're more comfortable reading transliterations in Roman script than in Arabic script. I think I'd probably go with Kalaam Gamiil. Of course, this is just my guess, though. :)

User avatar
Moraczewski
Posts: 59
Joined: 2010-11-09, 15:56
Real Name: Andrej Moraczewski
Gender: male
Location: Himki
Country: RU Russia (Российская Федерация)

Re: Short questions

Postby Moraczewski » 2017-04-11, 5:49

Could you please tell if this is standard Arabic or regional variety (supposed Sudanese Arabic). This is a recording of Dabanga Radio from Sudan.
http://vocaroo.com/i/s1WF6iPZ6vPG

User avatar
eskandar
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 2672
Joined: 2006-12-15, 8:27
Real Name: Eskandar
Gender: male

Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2017-04-11, 18:52

It's mostly in standard Arabic. There's a bit in English (sounds like it's picked up a different station) around three minutes in.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.


Return to “Arabic (العربية)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest