Translations - თარგმანები

BIBI75
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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby BIBI75 » 2010-01-06, 11:44

Hi everybody!
Could anyone translate following sentence into English: Tkveni mzrunvelogis shedegad.
If possible please translate each word!
Thanx in advance, BIBI :D

HoneyBuzzard
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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-01-06, 18:58

If that's actually Tkveni mzrunvelobis shedegad, it means "as a result of your concern/care".

Tkven-i is a possessive adjective for the second person plural ("your") with the -i indicating agreement with the following noun in the genitive. Mzrunvelobis is the genitive of mzrunveloba, which means care or concern. Shedegad is shedegi, meaning result or consequence, in the adverbial case. So it's:

Tkveni mzrunvelobis shedegad
As a result of your care.

And I think that's about it. Hope it helps :)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby cookietooting » 2010-02-03, 8:23

Could you translate this for me please?

8shi velodebi fuls

and

Es is iaxtaa romelzedac chven vcxovrobdit



Thanks ;)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-02-03, 21:59

8shi velodebi fuls


I am expecting money on the eighth.

Es is iaxtaa romelzedac chven vcxovrobdit


This is the yacht on which we were living.

I'm not sure what the da in romelzedac means though :? I'm guessing it's the same as romelzec. Maybe someone else can answer this :wink:
Last edited by HoneyBuzzard on 2010-03-12, 20:41, edited 1 time in total.

cookietooting
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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby cookietooting » 2010-02-04, 7:49

and sorry, these two!

Es is ar aris.

Dgas horvaiashi.

Thank you :)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-02-04, 13:41

Es is ar aris.


This is not it.

Dgas horvaiashi.


Hmm, I can't seem to find "horvaia" in any of my dictionaries. If it's a placename, it means it stands in Horvaia. "Croatia" in Georgian is Khorvat'ia (Xorvaṭia), and a google search for "Horvaia" brings up a bunch of results in Croatian, so that might be it. :)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby ninkaakanino » 2010-03-11, 22:21

HoneyBuzzard wrote:I'm not sure what the da in romelzedac means though :? I'm guessing it's the same as romelzec. Maybe someone else can answer this :wink:


yes it is almost the same. -da- has no meaning, it just expands the word so that it can sound more harmoniously :) :silly:
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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby ninkaakanino » 2010-03-11, 22:24

HoneyBuzzard wrote:
Es is ar aris.


This is not it.

Dgas horvaiashi.


Hmm, I can't seem to find "horvaia" in any of my dictionaries. If it's a placename, it means it stands in Horvaia. "Croatia" in Georgian is Khorvat'ia (Xorvaṭia), and a google search for "Horvaia" brings up a bunch of results in Croatian, so that might be it. :)



"horvaia" is indeed not a georgian word. there must be some spelling error. and yeah, "khorvatia" seems to be most probable :waytogo:
If you really want something in life you have to work for it. Now quiet, they're about to announce the lottery numbers. (H.S.)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-03-12, 22:25

Thank you for confirming my translations :D Now maybe you can give me a little help:

Firstly, I've been reading about the perfect series, and I'm having a bit of trouble with the first perfect of verbs like ლოდინი. Their gerunds neither have preverbs nor end in -ა, so I'm not sure how to apply the morphology. For example, how would you say "I have expected you"? My first guess was "გლოდინივარ" but the only perfect I've been able to find of ლოდინი at all is მოვლოდნივარ, which I'm guessing is I have expected it. Judging from that form, I guess "I have expected you" would be მოგლოდნივარ. Is that right? What about they must have expected us? უნდა მოგვლოდნოდნენ? Or do Georgian speakers simply not use indirect objects in the perfect of verbs like ლოდინი?

Secondly, what does the indirect object of მოსმენა refer to? At first I thought that the direct object was whatever was being listened to, e.g., მოვისმინე I listened to it (the it being the direct object), but then I encountered the form ვუსმენდი of the meaning I was listening to him (with the him being an indirect object). I'm wondering if this is one of those verbs where the indirect object is the possessor or referent of the direct object - this would actually make ვუსმენდი I was listening to his (words). Is it possible to say პროფესორს ლექცია მოვუსმინე I listened to the professor's lecture (with professor as the indirect object)?

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby ninkaakanino » 2010-03-18, 20:59

HoneyBuzzard wrote:how would you say "I have expected you"?


გელოდებოდი. (მე შენ) (the verb მოლოდინი - to expect, has no progressive form in first person, i ithink, so wait - ლოდინი is used instead.

HoneyBuzzard wrote:What about they must have expected us? უნდა მოგვლოდნოდნენ? Or do Georgian speakers simply not use indirect objects in the perfect of verbs like ლოდინი?


this one with "must" is a bit tricky. actually we usually use - ალბათ - probably, as in
ალბათ მოგველოდნენ - they were probably expecting us, ალბათ გველოდებოდნენ - they must have waiting for us. and without ალბათ, just (ისინი ჩვენ) მოგველოდნენ would correspond to - they were/have been expecting us.

HoneyBuzzard wrote:Secondly, what does the indirect object of მოსმენა refer to? At first I thought that the direct object was whatever was being listened to, e.g., მოვისმინე I listened to it (the it being the direct object), but then I encountered the form ვუსმენდი of the meaning I was listening to him (with the him being an indirect object). I'm wondering if this is one of those verbs where the indirect object is the possessor or referent of the direct object - this would actually make ვუსმენდი I was listening to his (words). Is it possible to say პროფესორს ლექცია მოვუსმინე I listened to the professor's lecture (with professor as the indirect object)?


your questions are so complicated? :) ი in მოვისმინე doesn't refer to an indirect object. it just generally means i listened to something. (as the verb is always transitive)
მოვუსმინე - has almost the same meaning. u maybe refers to an ind. object in some way.
ვუსმენდი - i was listening to somebody/something. nah, not necessarily to words. but usually somebody's saying something when you are listening.

i listened to the professor's lecture - პროფესორის ლექციას მოვუსმინე. you can't listen "somebody something" - პროფესორს მოვუსმინე (i listened to the professor, to somebody), ანდა - პროფესორის ლექციას მოვუსმინე. (i listened to the professor's lecture, to something)

i hope i helped you out.

:flowers:
If you really want something in life you have to work for it. Now quiet, they're about to announce the lottery numbers. (H.S.)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-03-19, 16:42

ninkaakanino wrote:
HoneyBuzzard wrote:how would you say "I have expected you"?


გელოდებოდი. (მე შენ) (the verb მოლოდინი - to expect, has no progressive form in first person, i ithink, so wait - ლოდინი is used instead.


I'm not sure I understand. გელოდებოდი looks like an imperfect to me (I was expecting you rather than I have expected you). I know certain verbs cannot be used in certain screeves, so is this the case here?

What about the form მოვლოდნივარ? I guess it could be an obsolescent form.

ninkaakanino wrote:
HoneyBuzzard wrote:What about they must have expected us? უნდა მოგვლოდნოდნენ? Or do Georgian speakers simply not use indirect objects in the perfect of verbs like ლოდინი?


this one with "must" is a bit tricky. actually we usually use - ალბათ - probably, as in
ალბათ მოგველოდნენ - they were probably expecting us, ალბათ გველოდებოდნენ - they must have waiting for us. and without ალბათ, just (ისინი ჩვენ) მოგველოდნენ would correspond to - they were/have been expecting us.


Hmm, very interesting. What screeve is მოგველოდნენ? Looks like an aorist, but this verb seems a little unpredictable.

ninkaakanino wrote:your questions are so complicated? :) ი in მოვისმინე doesn't refer to an indirect object. it just generally means i listened to something. (as the verb is always transitive)
მოვუსმინე - has almost the same meaning. u maybe refers to an ind. object in some way.


Yes, exactly. I guess native speakers don't think about it, but the u in these cases refers to various sorts of 3rd person non-direct objects (recipients, benefactors, etc.,) usually marked with the dative in syntax. I should probably present the sentences that made me wonder about this in the first place:

10.18
ძაღლს არ უყეფნია? დიახ, მან იყეფა, მე თვითონ მოვისმინე მისი ყეფა.
Hasn't the dog barked? Yes, he barked; I myself listened to his bark. (Here მოსმენა has no indirect object)

11.28
გაამეორებინეთ ვიქტორს პროფესორის ნათქვამი! როცა ლაპარაკობდა, არ ვუსმენდი.
Have Victor repeat what the professor said! When he was speaking, I wasn't listening to him. (Here მოსმენა has an indirect object - ვსმენდი)

I just don't see why one sentence would use a direct object and the other an indirect object.

ninkaakanino wrote:i listened to the professor's lecture - პროფესორის ლექციას მოვუსმინე. you can't listen "somebody something"


Well, Georgian has a number of verbs where the indirect object marks what would be a possessive in English, e.g.,

ამ ოსტატს მარჯვენა მოუჭრეს.
They cut off this master's right hand. (with "ოსტატს" as an indirect object corresponding to the English possessive)

მას მოუკვდა ძმა
His brother died. (with მას as an indirect object corresponding to the English possessive)

So what I was thinking was that maybe the არ ვუსმენდი above was actually (პროფესორს ნათქვამს) არ ვუსმენდი with პროფესორს as an indirect object of possessive meaning and ნათქვამს as the direct object. I guess it doesn't work that way, but something must be triggering the switch to an indirect object. And if the indirect object in sentence 11.28 is პროფესორს (i.e., listening to him), what is the direct object?

ninkaakanino wrote:i hope i helped you out.

:flowers:


Yes, definitely. There's still so much I don't know :D

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby C0LETTE » 2010-04-07, 17:06

Gamarjoba,

Can anyone please help me translate "კედლის სურათები"? I found it in one of my texts, but I can't figure it out.

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-04-08, 13:33

Hmm, best I can tell, it just means "pictures of (a) wall" - კედელი in the genitive and plural სურათი in the nominative. Does that make sense in the context of the text?

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby C0LETTE » 2010-04-13, 12:14

HoneyBuzzard wrote:Hmm, best I can tell, it just means "pictures of (a) wall" - კედელი in the genitive and plural სურათი in the nominative. Does that make sense in the context of the text?


Yes, it seems to match. Thanks :)

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby ninkaakanino » 2010-04-14, 18:57

So many questions. i'll try to answer some of them (sorry for long pauses, i'm busy with my studies..)

HoneyBuzzard wrote:
What about the form მოვლოდნივარ? I guess it could be an obsolescent form.


this is not a georgian verb form at all :) but feel free to coin new words :mrgreen:


HoneyBuzzard wrote:Hmm, very interesting. What screeve is მოგველოდნენ? Looks like an aorist, but this verb seems a little unpredictable.


i'm not sure about screeve names of georgian verbs :oops:



HoneyBuzzard wrote:10.18
ძაღლს არ უყეფნია? დიახ, მან იყეფა, მე თვითონ მოვისმინე მისი ყეფა.
Hasn't the dog barked? Yes, he barked; I myself listened to his bark. (Here მოსმენა has no indirect object)

11.28
გაამეორებინეთ ვიქტორს პროფესორის ნათქვამი! როცა ლაპარაკობდა, არ ვუსმენდი.
Have Victor repeat what the professor said! When he was speaking, I wasn't listening to him. (Here მოსმენა has an indirect object - ვსმენდი)

I just don't see why one sentence would use a direct object and the other an indirect object.


the common sense tells me that you can listen to a professor - as an indirect object. and usually nobody listens to dogs. you rather hear them bark or whatever sound they would make - thus, direct object -referring to ყეფა.

HoneyBuzzard wrote:Well, Georgian has a number of verbs where the indirect object marks what would be a possessive in English, e.g.,

ამ ოსტატს მარჯვენა მოუჭრეს.
They cut off this master's right hand. (with "ოსტატს" as an indirect object corresponding to the English possessive)


actually the english translation is not that correct, that's why you confuse georgian indirect object with english possessive. the literal translation would be - they cut off (to) the Master - (he being a patient in terms of semantics) a right hand. if you speak German, it becomes even clearer why "ostats" is an indirect object, and "marjvena" - a direct one - Sie haben dem Master die rechte Hand abgeschnitten (dem Master - dative/indirect object, die rechte Hand - accusative - direct object).

HoneyBuzzard wrote:მას მოუკვდა ძმა
His brother died. (with მას as an indirect object corresponding to the English possessive)


ok this example cannot be translated into english differently i guess. but if we try and translate the english "His brother died"back into georgian, you will get another sentence - მისი ძმა მოკვდა and in this case you get a possessive in georgian as well. :) so your hypothesis about indirect object corresponding to the englisch possessive is not justified in this case. maybe it's just a gap in translation.

HoneyBuzzard wrote:So what I was thinking was that maybe the არ ვუსმენდი above was actually (პროფესორს ნათქვამს) არ ვუსმენდი with პროფესორს as an indirect object of possessive meaning and ნათქვამს as the direct object. I guess it doesn't work that way, but something must be triggering the switch to an indirect object. And if the indirect object in sentence 11.28 is პროფესორს (i.e., listening to him), what is the direct object?


not sure if i get this question right. firstly, it's პროფესორს ნათქვამს. and yes - პროფესორს is a possessive form, not an indirect object. natqvams - is a direct object.
if you leave out - natqvams, you can say - პროფესორს არ ვუსენდი, and in that case პროფესორს is a direct object.

But i'm impressed!!! keep it up! :good4u: :cheery:
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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2010-04-15, 12:43

ninkaakanino wrote:So many questions. i'll try to answer some of them (sorry for long pauses, i'm busy with my studies..)


Heh, that's okay. I'm not in a hurry :)

ninkaakanino wrote:
HoneyBuzzard wrote:What about the form მოვლოდნივარ? I guess it could be an obsolescent form.


this is not a georgian verb form at all :) but feel free to coin new words :mrgreen:


This is the form I would have expected going from the example of other class II verbs in the first perfect (cf. დავმალვივარ I have hidden from him), and it does occur in at least one text:

http://titus.uni-frankfurt.de/texte/etca/cauc/mgeo/visr/visrg/visrg017.htm (about half way down the page)

The text is too hard for me, but it does feature that form. It's a translation of an old Persian text, so it's probably old - that's why I suggested the form might be obsolescent.

ninkaakanino wrote:
HoneyBuzzard wrote:Well, Georgian has a number of verbs where the indirect object marks what would be a possessive in English, e.g.,

ამ ოსტატს მარჯვენა მოუჭრეს.
They cut off this master's right hand. (with "ოსტატს" as an indirect object corresponding to the English possessive)


actually the english translation is not that correct, that's why you confuse georgian indirect object with english possessive. the literal translation would be - they cut off (to) the Master - (he being a patient in terms of semantics) a right hand. if you speak German, it becomes even clearer why "ostats" is an indirect object, and "marjvena" - a direct one - Sie haben dem Master die rechte Hand abgeschnitten (dem Master - dative/indirect object, die rechte Hand - accusative - direct object).


I'm not sure I see what you're getting at. The translations aren't supposed to be literal, and the indirect object clearly is functioning as a possessive in both the German and Georgian (as well as in several other languages that have these kinds of constructions). Here, let me quote you from Hammer's German Grammar and Usage, section 2.5.4, p. 43:

(a) The dative case often indicates possession

This is especially frequent with parts of the body or articles of clothing, but it is also found with close relatives and prized possesssions (like vehicles or houses). The definite article is used rather than a possessive determiner, see 4.6; the dative usually precedes the item possessed.


And I don't know how much of a hypothesis it is; the possessive use of the dative is a common and well documented construction in many languages.

Oh well, I guess it doesn't really matter anyway since this clearly isn't what's going on in our sentence with მოსმენა.

ninkaakanino wrote:
HoneyBuzzard wrote:So what I was thinking was that maybe the არ ვუსმენდი above was actually (პროფესორს ნათქვამს) არ ვუსმენდი with პროფესორს as an indirect object of possessive meaning and ნათქვამს as the direct object. I guess it doesn't work that way, but something must be triggering the switch to an indirect object. And if the indirect object in sentence 11.28 is პროფესორს (i.e., listening to him), what is the direct object?


პროფესორს არ ვუსენდი, and in that case პროფესორს is a direct object.


Is it really? Let me see if I can show you my problem:

The aorist of a verb like "send" marks a direct object with the nominative and has no verbal marker for a 3rd person direct object. Like so:


წერილიგაგზავნა
letter-NOMhe sent it
direct object

He sent the letter

We can throw an indirect object into the mix with a verbal indirect object marker (usually უ for the 3rd person) and optionally a noun in the dative. Like so:


მასწერილიგაუგზავნა
him-DATletter-NOMhe sent it to him
indirect objectdirect object

He sent the letter to him

Note how the indirect object is marked on the verb with უ. We can remove the noun in the dative, but there will still be an indirect object, and the direct object will still be წერილი. Like so:


წერილიგაუგზავნა
letter-NOMhe sent it to him
direct object

He sent the letter to him

We can't see the indirect object because we've dropped the მას, but because of the უ we still know that it's there.

Now let's compare this to მოსმენა:


მუსიკამოისმინა
music-NOMhe listened to it
direct object

He listened to music

But now look what happens when we throw an indirect object in there:


პროფესორსმოუსმინა
professor-DAThe listened to him
indirect object

He listened to the professor

Where did the direct object go? And if პროფესორს is the direct object as you say (in which case it would be პროფესორი because this is an aorist), where is our indirect object? (and there must be one because of the უ in მოუსმინა)

Let me put it another way:

If you push პროფესორს ვუსმენდი back to the aorist, would you get "პროფესორს მოვუსმინე" or "პროფესორი მოვუსმინე"? If the პროფესორს in "პროფესორს ვუსმენდი" is really a direct object, it should convert into an aorist as "პროფესორი მოვუსმინე" with a left-over indirect object, and if it's actually the indirect object corresponding to the უ on the verb, it should convert into an aorist as "პროფესორს მოვუსმინე" apparently with a left-over direct object. It looks like this verb simply loses its direct object when it gets an indirect object.

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Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby cookietooting » 2010-05-03, 9:20

a few short translations please!, if someone has the time :o)

cutshi

nu mitknav tvins

araperi agar aris chven horis

garda da magic tu ar ginda paka


thank you :)

kondenado
Posts: 1
Joined: 2012-11-15, 17:05

Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby kondenado » 2012-11-15, 17:10

Hi

I was wondering if you could help me traducting one sentence from english to geporgian.

In my laboratory (Danish Polymer center) we are going to have a christmas lunch, and we are going to translate the invitation to every native languaje of the people at the lab and there is somebody from Georgia.

The sentence to translate would be: "You are hereby invited to DPC's christmas lunch"

Kind regards

HoneyBuzzard
Posts: 454
Joined: 2009-04-18, 11:08

Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby HoneyBuzzard » 2012-11-16, 0:24

kondenado wrote:Hi

I was wondering if you could help me traducting one sentence from english to geporgian.

In my laboratory (Danish Polymer center) we are going to have a christmas lunch, and we are going to translate the invitation to every native languaje of the people at the lab and there is somebody from Georgia.

The sentence to translate would be: "You are hereby invited to DPC's christmas lunch"

Kind regards


Well, with the caveat that I'm just a learner, and the assumption that this is a company "julefrokost" (i.e., not actually a lunch at all), I would say:

დაპატიჟებული ხართ DPC-ის საშობაო ქეიფზე.
Dap̣aṭižebuli xart DPC-is sašobao keipze.

taidoa
Posts: 2
Joined: 2012-12-28, 21:58
Real Name: Tai
Gender: female

Re: Translations - თარგმანები

Postby taidoa » 2012-12-28, 22:04

My best friend is getting married; she and her fiance met while teaching together in Georgia for a year. I wanted to personalize the wedding card I am making for them with the language they both are in love with, but I know absolutely no Georgian and I don't really trust Google Translator.

Is there a way of saying, "Love Birds" in Georgian?
Or something close to that?

Thank you! (:


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