The How do you Pronounce X Thread

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Canard
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Postby Canard » 2006-04-14, 23:23

Am I the only one that uses that oh-so-lovely [ɨ] in the first syllable of decisive and divisive instead of [ə]?
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Kirk
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Postby Kirk » 2006-04-14, 23:34

Canard wrote:Am I the only one that uses that oh-so-lovely [ɨ] in the first syllable of decisive and divisive instead of [ə]?


Oh I probably do sometimes--in some cases it's in free variation with [ə]. I normally just mark [ə], tho.
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby Travis B. » 2006-04-15, 0:48

Kirk wrote:
Canard wrote:Am I the only one that uses that oh-so-lovely [ɨ] in the first syllable of decisive and divisive instead of [ə]?


Oh I probably do sometimes--in some cases it's in free variation with [ə]. I normally just mark [ə], tho.


On the other hand, I usually use a full [ɪ] in decisive, pronouncing it as [dɪˈsəɪsɪːf̆]. On the other hand, I more frequently use [ɨ] in divisive, pronouncing it as [dɨːˈvəɪsɪːf̆]. Why this variation occurs, my guess would be that it has to be due to the use of a coronal in one place and a labiodental in another for the following consonant, where the former case might be more likely to strongly favor a front vowel here than the latter.
secretGeek on CodingHorror wrote:Type inference is not a gateway drug to more dynamically typed languages.

Rather "var" is a gateway drug toward "real" type inferencing, of which var is but a tiny cigarette to the greater crack mountain!

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Postby Caramelicious » 2006-04-15, 0:51

I would like to participate, but I don't understand how these boxes are supposed to make/represent a sound, can someone explain it to me?
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Postby Travis B. » 2006-04-15, 2:26

Caramelicious wrote:I would like to participate, but I don't understand how these boxes are supposed to make/represent a sound, can someone explain it to me?


We are using IPA here to go and transcribe sounds; it also has a plain ASCII text analogue called X-SAMPA, but that happens to not be used much in this forum. For more information on IPA and X-SAMPA, go to:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-SAMPA

However, you speak of "boxes" here, which I would take as meaning that you do not have any proper font to display IPA characters with on your browser, making the IPA characters show up as boxes in one's browser. That I really cannot help you with, but you could probably search for "IPA" and "font" to find information about such.
secretGeek on CodingHorror wrote:Type inference is not a gateway drug to more dynamically typed languages.

Rather "var" is a gateway drug toward "real" type inferencing, of which var is but a tiny cigarette to the greater crack mountain!

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Postby Caramelicious » 2006-04-15, 10:43

Thank you!
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Postby Dminor » 2006-05-31, 18:47

Hey!

The paradigm of to win is 'to win, won, won'. However, for some reason I thought it was 'to win, won, wun'. Is there a difference in pronunciation? And if not, do you have any idea why I thought this? Or have I made it up entirely by myself?! :lol:
काव्यशास्त्रविनोदेन कालो गच्छति धीमताम् । व्यसनेन च मूर्खाणां निद्रया कलहेन वा

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Postby Le Serpent Rouge » 2006-05-31, 21:09

There’s no difference in pronunciation, it’s the same deal as ‘sit/sat/sat’ and ‘hurt/hurt/hurt’. So yep, it seems you made it up entirely, though by what stretch of the imagination, I cannot say. 8)
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Postby mgayoub » 2006-06-05, 23:41

Does anyone else have [ɪ] in "union"?
Last edited by mgayoub on 2006-06-07, 17:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Kirk » 2006-06-06, 0:15

mgayoub wrote:Does anyone else have [ɪ] in "union"?


I assume you mean in the final syllable? Yes, I do, since I am "Lennon-Lenin" merged to [ɪ]. This is commonly done in North American English. So anyway my pronunciation of "union" is something like this:

[ˈjɯnjɪn]

with the final syllable rhyming with that of the one in "pinyin" or "tailspin."
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby mgayoub » 2006-06-06, 6:57

Yes, I was referring to the final syllable. I only thought it was weird because of the fact that my dad, my mom, and my brother all have [ə], and I somehow ended up with [ɪ]. :roll:
Last edited by mgayoub on 2006-06-07, 17:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Kirk
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Postby Kirk » 2006-06-06, 8:26

mgayoub wrote:Yes, I was referring to the final syllable. I only thought it was weird because of the fact that my dad, my mom, and my brother all have [ə], and I somehow ended up with [ɪ]. :roll:


Interesting--from what I can tell everyone in my family is also "Lennon-Lenin" merged to [ɪ] so I'm no innovator as far as that goes. However, it is a common thing in North American English and if anything I would expect it to be growing rather than receding so maybe you're the first to pick up on it in your immediate family.

Anyway, we discussed the Lennon-Lenin merger here on another language-related forum if anyone is interested.
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby Nounoursette » 2006-06-15, 5:44

How do you pronounce "bear" and "beard" ?
Is there a difference?

Thank you! :D
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Postby Travis B. » 2006-06-15, 6:09

Nounoursette wrote:How do you pronounce "bear" and "beard" ?
Is there a difference?

Thank you! :D


I pronounce bear as [beːʁ] and beard as [bɪːʁd̥] myself.
secretGeek on CodingHorror wrote:Type inference is not a gateway drug to more dynamically typed languages.

Rather "var" is a gateway drug toward "real" type inferencing, of which var is but a tiny cigarette to the greater crack mountain!

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Kirk
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Postby Kirk » 2006-06-15, 9:03

Nounoursette wrote:How do you pronounce "bear" and "beard" ?
Is there a difference?

Thank you! :D


Yes--"bear" has the vowel of "air" and "beard" has the vowel of "ear" in many/most dialects. I say them [bɛɹ] and [bɪɹd] respectively.
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby Nounoursette » 2006-06-15, 14:50

Thanks! :D

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Pronunciation of ROUTE

Postby samiam1955 » 2006-07-21, 1:48

I have noticed that the word route is pronounced to rhyme with boot in New England, but ryhmes with about in the Midwest and West. I have a theory on this - because of the greater influence of French in New England, and German in the Midwest, the OU sound is pronounced in the French way by those in New England, and the German way by those in the Midwest. I would be interested in how people from different parts of the US, and the broader English-speaking world, pronounce the word. For instance, is it pronounced to rhyme with about in Pennsylvania or central Texas, where the German influence is strong? Is it pronounced to rhyme with boot in Lousiana?

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Re: Pronunciation of ROUTE

Postby mgayoub » 2006-07-23, 14:31

samiam1955 wrote:For instance, is it pronounced to rhyme with about in Pennsylvania or central Texas, where the German influence is strong?
I haven't been to Pennsylvania in a while, but I can tell you that in Texas I only rarely hear /rut/. /raut/ is far more common.

Aì hævìnt bìn tu Pìnsìlvenyé ìn é waìl, bút aì kæn tèl yu ðæt ìn Tèksìz aì onli rerli hir /rut/. /raut/ ìz far mor kòmìn.
Last edited by mgayoub on 2006-07-24, 8:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pronunciation of ROUTE

Postby Kirk » 2006-07-23, 20:17

samiam1955 wrote:I have noticed that the word route is pronounced to rhyme with boot in New England, but ryhmes with about in the Midwest and West. I have a theory on this - because of the greater influence of French in New England, and German in the Midwest, the OU sound is pronounced in the French way by those in New England, and the German way by those in the Midwest. I would be interested in how people from different parts of the US, and the broader English-speaking world, pronounce the word. For instance, is it pronounced to rhyme with about in Pennsylvania or central Texas, where the German influence is strong? Is it pronounced to rhyme with boot in Lousiana?


I, like many Americans, pronounce it both ways. For a specific numbered route such as Route 66 it always rhymes with "boot" for me. However, the set phrase "paper route" always rhymes with "about" for me. In terms of a generic "route" I find myself using either pronunciation somewhat interchangeably.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby chuff » 2006-08-20, 2:57

I share preference with Kirk.


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