Varieties of English

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Gormur
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Varieties of English

Postby Gormur » 2005-12-12, 17:12

Ok, I couldn't locate the thread with British vs American English, so I'll open this one...

Here are some differences I've heard as of late (between American and Canadian, in particular, which also applies to British too):

UK and Canada: have a look
US: take a look

UK and Canada: write an exam
US: take an exam

Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)

UK and Canada: go on holiday
US: go on vacation

UK and Canada: in hospital
US: in the hospital

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Re: Varieties of English

Postby darkina » 2005-12-12, 19:35

Gormur wrote:
Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)


Which is a British "to queue", unless I misunderstand you... :) (my Britishness just pushed me to add that ;))
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Postby Stan » 2005-12-13, 1:21

Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)

here it's "wait in line"

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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-13, 2:36

Stan wrote:
Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)

here it's "wait in line"


yes, and I've heard "wait on line" on the east coast.

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Re: Varieties of English

Postby Gormur » 2005-12-13, 2:37

Darky wrote:
Gormur wrote:
Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)


Which is a British "to queue", unless I misunderstand you... :) (my Britishness just pushed me to add that ;))


Yes, I wasn't sure what was used in the UK, so I didn't include that category.

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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-13, 2:42

Also, I don't know if these are regional or not.....

have a seat/take a seat
take the bus/bus it ("bus" is a verb here)
drive a car/motor or auto (to drive) - I motored to town.

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Postby ZombiekE » 2005-12-13, 12:43

For me:

UK/Canada: 3
US: 2

I would have never said wait in a line-up, but queue, or if I were in America, wait in line.

About the three Gormur added:
have a seat
take the bus
drive a car
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Re: Varieties of English

Postby kibo » 2005-12-13, 12:56

I'm not a native speaker, but here's what I'd use:

Gormur wrote:UK and Canada: have a look
US: take a look


Both.

Gormur wrote:UK and Canada: write an exam
US: take an exam


I though "take an exam" was universal, and "sit an exam" was UK but very formal.

Gormur wrote:Canada: wait in a line-up
US: wait in/on line (depending on the region)


queue. ;)

Gormur wrote:UK and Canada: go on holiday
US: go on vacation


Both, but I use holiday more. :)

Gormur wrote:UK and Canada: in hospital
US: in the hospital


in the hospital

Gormur wrote:have a seat/take a seat


both, I guess I would use have a seat more.

Gormur wrote:take the bus/bus it ("bus" is a verb here)
drive a car/motor or auto (to drive) - I motored to town.


to bus, to motor and to auto sound very funny to me. :lol:
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Postby allemaalmeezinge » 2005-12-13, 13:48

Bugui wrote:Queue


May I just step in and ask how this word is actually pronounced properly in English? :p
Like in French?

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Postby Kubi » 2005-12-13, 13:53

yabba wrote:
Bugui wrote:Queue


May I just step in and ask how this word is actually pronounced properly in English? :p
Like in French?

Not at all...it's more like [kju:].
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Postby kibo » 2005-12-13, 14:19

Yes, it's [kjuː], and it's pronounced the same way the letter Q is pronounced in English. :)
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Postby jonathan » 2005-12-13, 17:24

Another one, I think, UK speakers say "post" for what Americans would use for "post office."

e.g.,
UK: "I'll bring the letter to the post."
US: "I'll bring the letter to the post office."

...I think so, but UK English speakers please correct me if I'm wrong!
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Postby Dardallion » 2005-12-13, 23:28

But we say 'post' instead of 'mail'. Most of the time anyway, although many people are converting to American terms.

And we do say 'put it in the post' meaning 'send it via the post box\office'
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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-14, 0:08

jonathan wrote:Another one, I think, UK speakers say "post" for what Americans would use for "post office."

e.g.,
UK: "I'll bring the letter to the post."
US: "I'll bring the letter to the post office."

...I think so, but UK English speakers please correct me if I'm wrong!


Around here it's called "courier" instead of "post" (for "mail").

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Postby jonathan » 2005-12-14, 10:19

Gormur wrote:
jonathan wrote:Another one, I think, UK speakers say "post" for what Americans would use for "post office."

e.g.,
UK: "I'll bring the letter to the post."
US: "I'll bring the letter to the post office."

...I think so, but UK English speakers please correct me if I'm wrong!


Around here it's called "courier" instead of "post" (for "mail").


So what do you say in reference to an actual courier service?
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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-14, 17:12

jonathan wrote:
Gormur wrote:
jonathan wrote:Another one, I think, UK speakers say "post" for what Americans would use for "post office."

e.g.,
UK: "I'll bring the letter to the post."
US: "I'll bring the letter to the post office."

...I think so, but UK English speakers please correct me if I'm wrong!


Around here it's called "courier" instead of "post" (for "mail").


So what do you say in reference to an actual courier service?


People call it "the courier" - e.g. "the courier is slow". "Courier" seems to be used for "mail", "mail service", and "postman" (if I'm not mistaken). I wonder if this is a localized usage because I can't find any sources online, but I hear it almost exclusively around here. :?

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Postby MikeL » 2005-12-14, 20:00

Perhaps a French influence -"le courrier" is the ordinary French word for mail.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-12-14, 23:07

My experience with the courier here is that it is faster than mail....honest...I groan about how long mail takes more than I would groan about the 'courier'. To be fair though, I'd groan about anything that takes more than a week to reach another place when mailing between Australia and New Zealand.
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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-15, 1:37

riki wrote:My experience with the courier here is that it is faster than mail....honest...I groan about how long mail takes more than I would groan about the 'courier'. To be fair though, I'd groan about anything that takes more than a week to reach another place when mailing between Australia and New Zealand.


You want to talk about ridiculously slow, it took 6 months for my parents to get a packet I sent to them last year. Here's what I found on Canada Post (from Wiki) -

Canada Post has a history of troubled labour relations with its trade unions, particularly the Canadian Union of Postal Workers and the Letter Carrier's Union of Canada (which merged with CUPW in 1989) culminating in periodic strike action which has brought mail service in Canada to a halt. There have been at least 19 strikes and walkouts between 1965 and 2005 including several wildcat strikes. A number of these strikes have seen the corporation employ strike breakers and most, since the 1970s, have resulted in back-to-work legislation being passed by the Canadian parliament.


Everything is slow here though, and people are always making excuses. :roll:

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Postby Ariki » 2005-12-15, 1:54

now that's DISGUSTING!
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

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