Ontario Accent

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Rom
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Ontario Accent

Postby Rom » 2005-11-28, 16:05

After listening to several people from Ontario, I decided to give this accent a try. I hope I didn't exaggerate it too much. I recorded part of "Please call Stella", and the "Rainbow Passage". Is it convincing enough?

Audio file

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Gormur
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Postby Gormur » 2005-11-28, 22:43

Since I don't know which accent you're imitating, I couldn't say for sure. There are many accents in Ontario.

amoeba

Postby amoeba » 2005-11-30, 5:05

I live in Toronto, Ontario.

You would easily be taken for an 'Ontarian' here. I can't really pick apart the different nuances of Canadian English, though. Hearing that file, I don't pick out anything about it that screams out Ontario, as opposed to British Columbia or Nova Scotia.

And as Gormur said, there are many accents in Ontario. Your accent would be taken as a sort of 'neutral' accent without any strong regional or social colourings.

Just out of curiosity, were there any features of the langauge that you tried specifically to imitate here that were different from your own accent?

Edit: Hearing your file again, I notice that I say 'bag' differently than you. 8)

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Postby Gormur » 2005-11-30, 21:07

A few people were saying I sounded a bit Irish here, so I decided to attempt a Newfie accent, for fun (albeit, it is a bit different from Hiberno English).....

http://uploadhut.com/view.php/441002.wav

Note: There are often huge differences between dialects/accents within Newfoundland -- here, I (am attempting to) imitate more or less the speech of St. John's -- the largest city on the island. There are some dialects and accents which are extremely difficult to make out for non-Newfoundlanders (esp those in the north -- from what I hear). I may attempt some of those later on, or sneak a recording of a Newfie girl here in rez. She actually doesn't have a very distinctive accent though, IMO....

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Postby Sirach » 2005-12-22, 9:51

Gormur wrote:A few people were saying I sounded a bit Irish here, so I decided to attempt a Newfie accent, for fun (albeit, it is a bit different from Hiberno English).....

http://uploadhut.com/view.php/441002.wav

Note: There are often huge differences between dialects/accents within Newfoundland -- here, I (am attempting to) imitate more or less the speech of St. John's -- the largest city on the island. There are some dialects and accents which are extremely difficult to make out for non-Newfoundlanders (esp those in the north -- from what I hear). I may attempt some of those later on, or sneak a recording of a Newfie girl here in rez. She actually doesn't have a very distinctive accent though, IMO....


Yes, some Canadian accents are quite unique, but I bet that to most of us Canadians, they are almost inaudible in trying to pick up differential pronunciations. I for one, could not pick up a Newfie accent from this Newfie woman at my school until a person pointed it out.

Either that was an example of how we are so familiar with the accents that we dont' assume that they may be from another part of Canada, or it's just me :lol: .

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Postby Pips » 2005-12-22, 14:41

Canadian English, for the most part, shows very little dialectal differentiations across the country (with a few exceptions, of course - the most obvious being, of course, the various accents from Newfoundland; the Maritime provinces also have some features that distinguish them from the rest of the country, as does the English spoken in Quebec [particularly in the Montréal area]. But from the Ontario border to the West Coast, you won't encounter much variation in pronunciation.)
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Postby Sirach » 2005-12-23, 21:33

Pips wrote:Canadian English, for the most part, shows very little dialectal differentiations across the country (with a few exceptions, of course - the most obvious being, of course, the various accents from Newfoundland; the Maritime provinces also have some features that distinguish them from the rest of the country, as does the English spoken in Quebec [particularly in the Montréal area]. But from the Ontario border to the West Coast, you won't encounter much variation in pronunciation.)


How about that supposed Canadian Rising in words such as:

'knife' to 'knives'
'writer' to 'rider'

Of course, I don't know much about it in the first place, but perhaps this might strengthen in years to come as dialectal differences between provinces might arise if isolated long enough?

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Postby Gormur » 2005-12-30, 22:59

Pips wrote:Canadian English, for the most part, shows very little dialectal differentiations across the country (with a few exceptions, of course - the most obvious being, of course, the various accents from Newfoundland; the Maritime provinces also have some features that distinguish them from the rest of the country, as does the English spoken in Quebec [particularly in the Montréal area]. But from the Ontario border to the West Coast, you won't encounter much variation in pronunciation.)


There's a definite Manitoban or prairie dialect in existence, which includes characteristics like non-merged cot-caught speakers and an almost exaggerated form of Canadian raising.


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