Another Example of Canadian English?

Moderator: JackFrost

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Another Example of Canadian English?

Postby Gormur » 2005-11-08, 19:29

Reading my writer's handbook today, I see the following:

Academic writing permits some corrections. Make your corrections neatly, either by typing or by hand in black ink.


What I don't get is why the word "neatly" is in italics. And why "neatly"? Is this presriptivist English or a Canadianism? ...something else, perhaps?
How can one use an adjective in this case?

MikeL
Posts: 136
Joined: 2005-07-10, 22:58
Real Name: Michael Liddell
Gender: male
Location: Auckland
Country: NZ New Zealand (New Zealand / Aotearoa)

Re: Another Example of Canadian English?

Postby MikeL » 2005-11-08, 19:43

Gormur wrote:Reading my writer's handbook today, I see the following:

Academic writing permits some corrections. Make your corrections neatly, either by typing or by hand in black ink.


What I don't get is why the word "neatly" is in italics. And why "neatly"? Is this presriptivist English or a Canadianism? ...something else, perhaps?
How can one use an adjective in this case?


Not sure what you're getting at. Presumably the word is italicised for emphasis. And the usage is normal - "neatly" is an adverb modifying the verb "make". There is a syntactical difference between "make your corrections neatly" and "make your corrections neat" although the end result is the same!

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Re: Another Example of Canadian English?

Postby Gormur » 2005-11-08, 20:10

MikeL wrote:
Gormur wrote:Reading my writer's handbook today, I see the following:

Academic writing permits some corrections. Make your corrections neatly, either by typing or by hand in black ink.


What I don't get is why the word "neatly" is in italics. And why "neatly"? Is this presriptivist English or a Canadianism? ...something else, perhaps?
How can one use an adjective in this case?


Not sure what you're getting at. Presumably the word is italicised for emphasis. And the usage is normal - "neatly" is an adverb modifying the verb "make". There is a syntactical difference between "make your corrections neatly" and "make your corrections neat" although the end result is the same!


I see. Thank you for the explanation. I was a bit thrown off because I have never seen such a usage in American texts. I'm wondering if that's a coicidence or just matter of preference in certain instances (or dialects).


Return to “English”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest