the word hello

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Stan
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the word hello

Postby Stan » 2005-10-19, 22:25

does anybody else think that the word "hello" is becoming more and more formal?

I would only use "hello" in the most formal situation

98% of the time I say "hey" or "hi", most of the time the first one

I only say hello when I'm answering the phone :lol:
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Re: the word hello

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-20, 0:04

Stan wrote:does anybody else think that the word "hello" is becoming more and more formal?

I would only use "hello" in the most formal situation

98% of the time I say "hey" or "hi", most of the time the first one

I only say hello when I'm answering the phone :lol:


Formality depends largely on context. You probably wouldn't answer the phone saying "hi", but "hello", as that is the "designated greeting" for such a situation. This has nothing to do with formality.

On the other hand, if one were to use "hello" in a face-to-face greeting, it might be considered rather formal as the usual greeting (in many dialects) is "hi" or "hey" (here in Canada, the usual greeting is "hey", whereas "hi" has a somewhat more formal connotation - you might use "hi" on first meeting someone, for example).

In the case of writing, it is more or less optional; though "hello" is generally viewed as better. I would use "hello" in a letter or E-mail to someone I didn't know, for example. However, IMHO this is just a matter of common courtesy

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Postby Kirk » 2005-10-20, 0:46

What you guys have said basically reflects my usage too--"hello" is somewhat restricted to more formal settings (or domain-specific circumstances like answering the phone) mostly in favor of "hey" and a little less commonly, "hi."

The same can be said of "yes" vs. "yeah." In my normal everyday speech, "yeah" ([jæ] or [ja]) is way more common than "yes."
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Postby amoeba » 2005-10-20, 2:02

'Hello' can also have an ironic or playful connotation. I often greet my friends with a 'hello' but it's certainly not the same 'hello' I use with my professors or on the phone. To make a playful hello, just take any part of the word to rediculously absurd lengths, e.g. hellooooooo, helllllllo!

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-10-20, 2:38

I usually use "hello" for formality. The rest is "hi" and "hey".

In French, usually I say "bonjour" to people I never met before and for formality. Otherwise it's "hey", "allô", or "salut" (mostly I use 'allô'). But some people says "allô" at me in shops and restaurants.
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Postby Ariki » 2005-10-20, 9:04

Does anybody else think that the word "hello" is becoming more and more formal?


I feel it is somewhat.

I would only use "hello" in the most formal situation


Greetings for me :)

98% of the time I say "hey" or "hi", most of the time the first one


The same applies to me when I'm in an informal conversation or if I'm with someone that I know.

I only say hello when I'm answering the phone


You probably wouldn't answer the phone saying "hi", but "hello", as that is the "designated greeting" for such a situation.


I say 'hi' :)
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Postby Alcadras » 2005-10-20, 10:09

Daniel wrote:I only say 'Hallo' or 'Hey (hey)', 'Hi' or even 'Heyup'.

'Hello' sounds much too formal so I only say it in formal situations - ie. meeting "important" people.

it's totally the same with me.

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Postby Travis B. » 2005-10-20, 11:12

Kirk wrote:What you guys have said basically reflects my usage too--"hello" is somewhat restricted to more formal settings (or domain-specific circumstances like answering the phone) mostly in favor of "hey" and a little less commonly, "hi."

The same can be said of "yes" vs. "yeah." In my normal everyday speech, "yeah" ([jæ] or [ja]) is way more common than "yes."


My usage is pretty much the same, except that I do not use "hi" much at all, and also use "ey" alongside "hey" (well, it's really "hey" with an elided /h/, as it is never preceded by a glottal stop, unlike words which phonemically begin with a vowel in my dialect), and I also have a "yah" ([ja]) alongside "yeah" ([jæ] approaching [jɛ]), which I perceive as a separate word from such, which has usage similar to (but not exactly the same usage as) it. In general, I have to say that I perceive "hello" and "yes" as being rather formal, and "yes" as being very strongly affirmative as well, and do not use them much in my general everyday speech. Consequently, "hey"/"ey" is primarily used in the place of the "hello", and "yeah" and "yah" are primarily used in the place of "yes" for most everyday usage fo rme.
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Postby Cisza » 2005-10-20, 11:54

It's a very interesting process. 20 years ago I was taught in school that hello is a strongly informal form and in formal speech I should use something like "Good morning" etc. depending on time. Maybe I had not the best teachers or maybe the time changes so quickly, but what do you think now about such forms of greeting? Do they sound archaic for you or even incorrect? And when hello became a formal kind of greeting? It's interesting to trace the evolution...
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Postby Travis B. » 2005-10-20, 12:01

Cisza wrote:It's a very interesting process. 20 years ago I was taught in school that hello is a strongly informal form and in formal speech I should use something like "Good morning" etc. depending on time. Maybe I had not the best teachers or maybe the time changes so quickly, but what do you think now about such forms of greeting? Do they sound archaic for you or even incorrect? And when hello became a formal kind of greeting? It's interesting to trace the evolution...


For me at least, "good morning" definitely is still current, but it is on the very high end with respect to formality, along the lines of other things such as "have a good day" and like. "Hello", for me at least, is not quite as formal as "good morning", but it is still rather formal nonetheless, and generally is not used in most informal speech here, except in the modified versions "lo" (/lo/ -> [ɫo]) and "hlo" (//hlo/ -> [ɫ̥o] or [çɫo]), even though those are not that common here at that.
secretGeek on CodingHorror wrote:Type inference is not a gateway drug to more dynamically typed languages.

Rather "var" is a gateway drug toward "real" type inferencing, of which var is but a tiny cigarette to the greater crack mountain!

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Postby Gormur » 2005-10-20, 15:13

At least here nearly everyone would use "good morning" while I think it's more common in some parts of the States to say "morning" or "mornin'" for short. I have never heard that form used here.

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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-10-20, 16:56

Hello seems to me to be used only for the telephone. And the way you intone it says a lot.

"Hey" and "what's up" are more common, particularly in conversation. Online, if someone says "hello" I find that extremely, extremely odd. This one kid I know always says hello, and it seems almost a little creepy. LOL I don't know why.

I don't think I hear anyone in conversation say "hello" anymore, actually.
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Postby Travis B. » 2005-10-20, 20:16

Gormur wrote:At least here nearly everyone would use "good morning" while I think it's more common in some parts of the States to say "morning" or "mornin'" for short. I have never heard that form used here.


At least here, "g'morning" (/ˈgmornɪŋ/ -> [ˈgmoːɹ.nɪ̃ŋ]) or just "morning" seems to be more common, and is significantly less formal, than "good morning" as such, which is quite formal and not that common overall.
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Postby Rom » 2005-10-22, 2:23

The pattern here is: If someone says "Hello!" (if it's said in a friendly tone it's not particularily formal sounding), then you say "Hi!" back to them. If they say "Hi!" then you respond with "Hello!" If they say "Hi, [name]!", then you respond with "Hi!" but never "Hello" or "Hello/Hi [name]". You say "Hey!" to someone only if you were talking to someone else before you saw them, or are talking in a group and then they respond with "Hi!" "Good morning" is extremely rare, and "Good day" and "Good evening" are even rarer (and only if you are about to give a lecture or something.). To respond to "Good morning" you just smile and nod or say "Hi!" (Unless it's a lecture in which case everyone shouts "Good morning!"). "What's up" seems to have died out here almost completely, but the response is "Hi!", or "nothing much" or just silence. The word "yes" doesn't sound all that formal though, and is completely interchangeable with "yeah" (which isn't particularily informal either")

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Postby Jamie*On » 2005-10-22, 15:53

Personally:

hi - always, if I meet someone in person whether being formal or informal

hello - on the phone before I know who's on the other end of the line. "Hello? Oh, David, hi!" for example.

Hope that helps.

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Postby Cisza » 2005-10-24, 13:09

Rom wrote: "Good morning" is extremely rare, and "Good day" and "Good evening" are even rarer


Good day?! I was taught that good day isn't a very polite form of greeting, having a special hue ("well, I would say you something like hello, 'cause you are here, but I want to get rid of you")
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Postby Rom » 2005-10-24, 14:09

Cisza wrote:
Rom wrote: "Good morning" is extremely rare, and "Good day" and "Good evening" are even rarer


Good day?! I was taught that good day isn't a very polite form of greeting, having a special hue ("well, I would say you something like hello, 'cause you are here, but I want to get rid of you")

It only means you want to get rid of someone if you use an angry tone of voice: ":x Good day to you! :x "

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Postby jonathan » 2005-10-26, 16:55

As for me, I say Hi most often. But I'll say Hello to make my greeting more emphatic. I find that Hello has a sound (perhaps from being less used) that when used, gives the impression of a more meaningful—and perhaps more genuine—greeting. When I say "hello," I notice people respond to it warmly; I think it just feels more kind. Maybe it's a subconcious thing: since we don't really hear it, we think of it as special when we do.
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Postby Travis B. » 2005-10-26, 19:47

jonathan wrote:As for me, I say Hi most often. But I'll say Hello to make my greeting more emphatic. I find that Hello has a sound (perhaps from being less used) that when used, gives the impression of a more meaningful—and perhaps more genuine—greeting. When I say "hello," I notice people respond to it warmly; I think it just feels more kind. Maybe it's a subconcious thing: since we don't really hear it, we think of it as special when we do.


Hello I tend to find to be much more formal than hi, but it, yes, does seem to be "nicer" than hi as well, which I tend to find to be quite non-personal as greetings go (unlike hey, which I find to be far warmer than it).
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Rather "var" is a gateway drug toward "real" type inferencing, of which var is but a tiny cigarette to the greater crack mountain!


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