An Example of Canadian English

Moderator: JackFrost

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

An Example of Canadian English

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-09, 23:49

A question that none of my Canadian friends could answer...

My Psycology text (obviously Canadian) talks about "Behaviour Science" rather than "Behavioural Science". I've run into many similar things in the text, which I will search for later. Is this an example of Canadian English or am I missing something? What's the grammatical logic behind this?

I think I've forgotten "American English". I'm totally screwed up now... :? :lol:

User avatar
Kirk
Posts: 2607
Joined: 2005-05-26, 19:43
Real Name: Kirk
Gender: male
Location: Los Angeles
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: An Example of Canadian English

Postby Kirk » 2005-10-09, 23:55

Gormur wrote:A question that none of my Canadian friends could answer...

My Psycology text (obviously Canadian) talks about "Behaviour Science" rather than "Behavioural Science". I've run into many similar things in the text, which I will search for later. Is this an example of Canadian English or am I missing something? What's the grammatical logic behind this?

I think I've forgotten "American English". I'm totally screwed up now... :? :lol:


That is interesting. I'm only used to hearing "behavioral science," not "behavior science." A google search for "behavio(u)r science" turns up few results, and even the Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science uses the "-al" form, so I'm not sure if it's a Canadian thing or just a peculiarity of your textbook.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

Stan
Posts: 2534
Joined: 2004-11-21, 0:19
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Postby Stan » 2005-10-10, 0:04

I've heard of "in hospital" as in "she's in hospital"
and "at university" as in "I'm at university"

For the first I would say "she's in the hospital"
for the second I would say "I'm in college"

college here is a synonym for university
if I was President,
I'd get elected on Friday
assassinated on Saturday
buried on Sunday

Stan
Posts: 2534
Joined: 2004-11-21, 0:19
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Re: An Example of Canadian English

Postby Stan » 2005-10-10, 0:08

Gormur wrote:A question that none of my Canadian friends could answer...

My Psycology text (obviously Canadian) talks about "Behaviour Science" rather than "Behavioural Science". I've run into many similar things in the text, which I will search for later. Is this an example of Canadian English or am I missing something? What's the grammatical logic behind this?

I think I've forgotten "American English". I'm totally screwed up now... :? :lol:


maybe it is part of this growing trend of using nouns as adjectives

for example, I've heard many people talking about if we might have a woman president in the near-future. The adjectival form of this would actually be female
if I was President,

I'd get elected on Friday

assassinated on Saturday

buried on Sunday

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-10, 0:26

Canadian English: Expiry date
American English: expiration date

actually, I hear both of them here.

Stan
Posts: 2534
Joined: 2004-11-21, 0:19
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Postby Stan » 2005-10-10, 0:31

Gormur wrote:Canadian English: Expiry date
American English: expiration date

actually, I hear both of them here.


expiry? I've never heard of that before.

is the i more of an /aj/ or is it a schwa as in "expiration"?
if I was President,

I'd get elected on Friday

assassinated on Saturday

buried on Sunday

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-10, 0:32

Stan wrote:I've heard of "in hospital" as in "she's in hospital"
and "at university" as in "I'm at university"


It varies across Canada. I've only heard British Columbians (my friends) use "in hospital". "At university" or "in university". It depends on the usage, just as in the States.

college here is a synonym for university


Not here. If you go to "college" in Canada, you're going to a trade/tech school. :wink:

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-10, 0:34

Stan wrote:
Gormur wrote:Canadian English: Expiry date
American English: expiration date

actually, I hear both of them here.


expiry? I've never heard of that before.

is the i more of an /aj/ or is it a schwa as in "expiration"?


Expiration doesn't always have a shwa here, sometimes it is ex-pi-ration, like ex-pi-ry date.

Stan
Posts: 2534
Joined: 2004-11-21, 0:19
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Postby Stan » 2005-10-10, 0:35

Gormur wrote:
Stan wrote:
Gormur wrote:Canadian English: Expiry date
American English: expiration date

actually, I hear both of them here.


expiry? I've never heard of that before.

is the i more of an /aj/ or is it a schwa as in "expiration"?


Expiration doesn't always have a shwa here, sometimes it is ex-pi-ration, like ex-pi-ry date.


ok :wink:
if I was President,

I'd get elected on Friday

assassinated on Saturday

buried on Sunday

User avatar
Cisza
Posts: 345
Joined: 2005-07-13, 10:00
Real Name: Walery Tichonow
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: PL Poland (Polska)

Postby Cisza » 2005-10-10, 15:26

Gormur wrote:Canadian English: Expiry date
American English: expiration date


Russian English: Date of expiry :)

(I've seen it many times on packages of goods, which have additonal info in English)
Różnica między wielbłądem i człowiekiem – wielbłąd może pracować przez tydzień nie pijąc; człowiek może przez tydzień pić nie pracując.

User avatar
Oleksij
Posts: 4762
Joined: 2005-06-28, 16:46
Real Name: Олексій Мірошниченко
Gender: male
Location: Nicosia
Country: CY Cyprus (Κύπρος / Kıbrıs)
Contact:

Postby Oleksij » 2005-10-11, 18:04

In Ireland it's also said "date of expiry".
Moja ulica murem podzielona - świeci neonami prawa strona, lewa strona cała wygaszona, zza zasłony obserwuję obie strony.
My Youtube Channel
Last.fm

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-11, 18:38

Yes, probably BE.

User avatar
Gormur
Posts: 7549
Joined: 2005-05-17, 1:11
Real Name: Gormur
Gender: male
Country: CU Cuba (Cuba)
Contact:

Postby Gormur » 2005-10-12, 18:36

Daniel wrote:Here, it's "expiry date" or "date of expiry".

:!: Irish English isn't necessarily British English, though.


Hiberno-English, I know. :wink:


Return to “English”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest