This is not a joke...

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Kazimer
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This is not a joke...

Postby Kazimer » 2005-10-04, 21:14

While helping my little brother with his social studies homework this is what I found.

Cultural Diffusion

Cultural diffusion is how a culture spreads its knowledge and skills from one area to another. Merchants and traders used to be the major agents, or causes, of cultural diffusion. They spread cultures when they bought and sold goods.

Today, cultural diffusion occurs through radio, television, telephones, computers, and the Internet. For instance, as many as one-third of the world's people speak English, often because of American television and the Internet. English is used in between 80 and 90 percent of of Web sites worldwide. Airline pilots use English to communicate when they fly across national borders. Many experts predict that businesspeople worldwide will have to learn English-the language of most computer software-to keep up with world trade. Because of technology English is the most widely used second language in the world.



This book was published in 2003.

How does this make you feel?

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ZombiekE
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Postby ZombiekE » 2005-10-04, 22:21

It's not new. I've been learning English since I was 6, so I guess our country found it was important by then. Now, children start learning English when they are three.

I read somewhere half of the world's population would speak English in 50 years.

Personally, I find it nice as I am studying English to teach it. The more people who want to speak it, the more chances I have to get a job!
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Postby Gormur » 2005-10-04, 22:29

ZombiekE wrote:Personally, I find it nice as I am studying English to teach it. The more people who want to speak it, the more chances I have to get a job!


Same here. Well, it'll be a part-time thing during the summer anyway. :P

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Postby Rounin » 2005-10-05, 22:51

It's too bad we landed on such a complex language for our lingua franca. :)

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Postby Cro Magnon » 2005-10-05, 23:21

Rounin wrote:It's too bad we landed on such a complex language for our lingua franca. :)


I wouldn't call it that complex. Spanish has 2 genders and a whole slew of verb conjugations, and from what little I know, German is even worse. Though I'll admit the spelling and pronounciation is a problem in English.
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Postby Stan » 2005-10-06, 0:03

Cro Magnon wrote:Spanish has 2 genders and a whole slew of verb conjugations


so what? English has just as much verb conjugations. The only difference is they aren't attached to the verb.

think about it:

the verb "be"

is /are
was / were
would be
had been
has been
would have been

and on and on and on
if I was President,
I'd get elected on Friday
assassinated on Saturday
buried on Sunday

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Postby ego » 2005-10-06, 0:19

Indeed Spanish is so hell difficult!!!
But the English verbs are harder than the Spanish ones!!!!!!!

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Postby Ariki » 2005-10-06, 4:26

Cultural diffusion is how a culture spreads its knowledge and skills from one area to another. Merchants and traders used to be the major agents, or causes, of cultural diffusion. They spread cultures when they bought and sold goods.


Very nice, simple explanation.

Today, cultural diffusion occurs through radio, television, telephones, computers, and the Internet.


Agree

For instance, as many as one-third of the world's people speak English, often because of American television and the Internet.


Statistics please (it could be MORE or LESS)

English is used in between 80 and 90 percent of of Web sites worldwide.


That's because the internet was first fully utilised in the US - it doesn't help that a lot of influential TNCs are also based in the USA.

Airline pilots use English to communicate when they fly across national borders.


Well, they have to communicate somehow...

Many experts predict that businesspeople worldwide will have to learn English-the language of most computer software-to keep up with world trade.


Once again, market dominance coming from English based TNCs

Because of technology English is the most widely used second language in the world.


Once again, statistics - because if only 1/3 of the world's population are able to use English, I'd like to know what the other 2/3 are able to use. It also, does not indicate how bilingual or multilingual people are throughout the world.
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-10-06, 5:09

ego wrote:Indeed Spanish is so hell difficult!!!
But the English verbs are harder than the Spanish ones!!!!!!!

:twisted: :twisted: :twisted:
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Postby Gormur » 2005-10-06, 16:24

Psi-Lord wrote:
ego wrote:Indeed Spanish is so hell difficult!!!
But the English verbs are harder than the Spanish ones!!!!!!!

:twisted: :twisted: :twisted:


Portuguese makes Spanish look easy. :twisted:

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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-10-06, 19:39

Stan wrote:
Cro Magnon wrote:Spanish has 2 genders and a whole slew of verb conjugations


so what? English has just as much verb conjugations. The only difference is they aren't attached to the verb.

think about it:

the verb "be"

is /are
was / were
would be
had been
has been
would have been

and on and on and on


I love Spanish, and I love all the romance languages, but I don't understand how Spanish got the reputation in the United States for being the "easiest" foreign language. In a way it's actually doing Spanish a bit of an injustice to say it's that simple of a language to learn... and I also think it makes people expect to pick it up far faster than they really do.

Spanish pronunciation is extremely easy to pick up, however.
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Postby Car » 2005-10-06, 20:23

reflexsilver86 wrote:I love Spanish, and I love all the romance languages, but I don't understand how Spanish got the reputation in the United States for being the "easiest" foreign language. In a way it's actually doing Spanish a bit of an injustice to say it's that simple of a language to learn... and I also think it makes people expect to pick it up far faster than they really do.


I think that can be easily explained. Beginning Spanish certainly isn't very difficult and many people probably never get far enough to get to know the real difficulties. For a long time, I thought Spanish was easier than French, but now, after knowing more Spanish, I'd say the opposite, and French has the reputation of being hard... The same applies to English here. So many people claim it's "easy", but once they actually write in English (and I've seen texts by those people where I could spot several mistakes easily, and they even had the same native language), it's so crystal clear to me, the real difficulties come much, much later. So if it's easy for a beginner, it's called easy, if it's hard, it's called hard.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-10-07, 2:35

Car wrote:
reflexsilver86 wrote:I love Spanish, and I love all the romance languages, but I don't understand how Spanish got the reputation in the United States for being the "easiest" foreign language. In a way it's actually doing Spanish a bit of an injustice to say it's that simple of a language to learn... and I also think it makes people expect to pick it up far faster than they really do.


I think that can be easily explained. Beginning Spanish certainly isn't very difficult and many people probably never get far enough to get to know the real difficulties. For a long time, I thought Spanish was easier than French, but now, after knowing more Spanish, I'd say the opposite, and French has the reputation of being hard... The same applies to English here. So many people claim it's "easy", but once they actually write in English (and I've seen texts by those people where I could spot several mistakes easily, and they even had the same native language), it's so crystal clear to me, the real difficulties come much, much later. So if it's easy for a beginner, it's called easy, if it's hard, it's called hard.


I really agree with you on that, Car. Because I noticed something similar about French. Everyone here has an image that French is an incredibly hard language to learn. The pronunciation can in fact be very difficult, and understanding a spoken conversation has to be one of the more difficult aspects of French, as opposed to Italian or Spanish, for example.

But the written language is actually very logical to a native English speaker, especially due to the tremendous amount of cognates between the two languages. And many of the cognates that exist in French are sometimes identical or nearly identical in spelling to their English counterparts (in Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese you can easily recognize them if you learn the rules of how these languages evolved)

And most beginners have no idea about the various tenses that exist in Spanish, for example. So at first glance it does seem simple, but of course no language is that simple.
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Postby Car » 2005-10-07, 9:47

reflexsilver86 wrote:The pronunciation can in fact be very difficult, and understanding a spoken conversation has to be one of the more difficult aspects of French, as opposed to Italian or Spanish, for example.


I'm not so sure about Spanish here. Ok, my French is clearly better and it certainly takes some time to understand it, but I never had the impression nor heard that "French-speakers speak so fast" while that's what most say when they hear Spanish. Italian, on the other hand, really seems to be easier to understand, I don't know much more than basic pronunciation rules, but yet it happened quite often that I found it easier to understand Italian than Spanish or Catalan.
Pronouncing French words is something you can get used to, but spelling them correctly is so much harder, unlike Spanish.

And most beginners have no idea about the various tenses that exist in Spanish, for example. So at first glance it does seem simple, but of course no language is that simple.


As a beginner, you're dealing with ser vs. estar, por vs. para and the like, but all those tenses and other grammatical aspects really aren't easy.
Please correct my mistakes!

icx

Postby icx » 2005-10-07, 13:44

Well it makes me feel that English kinda rulz the world. ;)

Many experts predict that businesspeople worldwide will have to learn English-the language of most computer software-to keep up with world trade.


It's already required all over the world.

icx

Postby icx » 2005-10-07, 13:51

Why is English more difficult? The only difference between the infinitive and the Present tense in English is a "s". [for the regular verbs ;)] Watch this:

TO SING
I sing
You sing
He sings
We sing
You sing
They sing


CANTAR
Canto
Cantas
Canta
Cantamos
Cantais
Cantan

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Postby ZombiekE » 2005-10-07, 15:15

Most people who say Spanish is an easy language prove in that sentence (if written in Spanish) that it's not xD

"habla español"
"hable español"

When they want to say "hablo español" xD

No comments about the subjunctive mood and all the stuff. I think Spanish is hard when one wants to become a fluent speaker. Maybe it's not very hard when one is still at the beginner level, but verbs are much harder than English ones. Of course the English languages does what we do in separate words, but most of them are common among different subjects, while in Spanish you need to learn them separately.
Last edited by ZombiekE on 2005-10-08, 14:48, edited 1 time in total.
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icx

Postby icx » 2005-10-07, 16:58

"habla español"
"hable español"


:lol: Yeah, i saw many.


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