Monterey Arabish: A new dialect of English

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Lee
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Postby Lee » 2005-10-01, 12:34

What about starting to use foreign pronunciation? I think I sometimes do use Indonesian pronunciation of English loan words in English and I just realised I have a tendency to start trilling my r's as well. :shock:
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Stan
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Postby Stan » 2005-10-04, 23:00

ZombiekE wrote:Actually, most Spaniglish we get comes from Latin American soap operas. Especially in those where the characters are wealthy people from Latin America who move to the US.

We use the word "party" for events in which people bring their own PC's and connect them to a LAN. I don't know if people from Latin America use "party" for that too. We have no word for that, but we don't use it for "fiesta".

We don't use "weekend" either. I think I heard it once in an advertisement on TV, but just there.

I would also like to add I heard "ser greedy" used in a Spanish sentence today :P
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Postby Kazimer » 2005-10-04, 23:46

Here in Ohio we have a fairly large Puerto Rican population which is larger than the Mexican one. A lot of times things are in English and Spanish like at the BMV (bureau of motor vehicles). And sometimes when I call certain places their is always the Spanish option. Interesting....

I guess in the USA Spanish is becoming more important. Like at my school people learning Spanish outnumber the people learning French like 5:1. Also, putting on an application you speak Spanish is more likely to get you hired than if you say you speak French or German or both. One other thing we have quite a few Spanish channels. Even PBS (Public Broadcasting System) has been introducing many more kids programs that have Spanish speaking characters and things like that.

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Kirk
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Re: Monterey Arabish: A new dialect of English

Postby Kirk » 2005-10-05, 0:00

Tom K. wrote:I suppose it's inevitable: you get a bunch of people together who are all studying the same language, and little bits of that language are going to start appearing in the way they speak their native language. Hang around some DLI Arabic students in Monterey for a while and you're bound to hear exchanges like this:

"Who has cash?" "Ana." (Ana = I)
"There's 12 feet of water fy New Orleans." (fy = in)
"How was class break?" "Jayid jidden." (very good)
"I finally made Phase IV, al hamdu li-lah." (praise be to God)
"I can't pay attention to people singing Karaoke. Walakin, you picked a good song." (walakin = but)

I overheard someone saying the other day he was talking to his mother on the phone, said "jayid jidden" without really thinking about it, and his mother of course could only say "huh?" Other words that have crept into our English include "shukran" (thank you), "mumtaz" (excellent), "limatha?" (why?), "mumkin" (maybe), "tayyib" (OK), "in shah allah" (God willing), "ma salaama," (goodbye), the greetings "marhaban" and "ahlan wa sahlan," and of course "naam" (yes) and "la" (no), and probably lots of other stuff that I can't think of now.

People studying other languages probably also do this too, but I haven't heard much. I asked some Korean students about it and they said they don't do that with Korean because "we hate Korean!" (apparently people find Korean too frustrating) However, I asked some Chinese students and they said they do the same thing with Chinese we do with Arabic. They call it "Chinglish." I wonder if anyone speaks "Farsish" or "Darish" around here?


That happened when I studied abroad in Argentina and I got together with other Americans also studying abroad there. We would pepper our English with Spanish words and phrases which we knew everyone there would understand or sometimes even use English words in a nontraditional sense because they were close to a similar-looking Spanish word. One example of this was "partials." "Parciales" in Spanish means "midterms" and we used the Spanish word so often in speaking Spanish that when we actually spoke English again with fellow Americans, "partials" slipped out quite often instead of expected "midterms."

"How were your partials?"

Here's another example of stuff I heard from American friends speaking English:

"Ok, so last night we went to this boliche (club)in el centro (downtown) and there were totally all these piropoers (piropo = catcall...so piropoer is one who does that) around...etc."

"Did you try the carne (meat) at that place? It's better at that restaurant"

"Did you try that ddl?" (ddl, short for dulce de leche). I heard various words for that one in English, including "dulce" [duls].

One time I caught myself saying "you need to grab me that CD" when I meant "burn," but I had been thinking of Spanish "grabar" so even tho I was speaking English "grab" instead of "burn" came out.

Interesting phenomenon!
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Postby Gormur » 2005-10-05, 0:23

Lee wrote:What about starting to use foreign pronunciation? I think I sometimes do use Indonesian pronunciation of English loan words in English and I just realised I have a tendency to start trilling my r's as well. :shock:


I tend to use trilled "r" after "th" nearly always, and I'm not sure why. I've always had this problem for as long as I can remember. :oops:

I notice my retroflex "r" sometimes is further back in the throat than my friends, depending on what I'm saying.

Hm, well I'm not sure how to describe it well enough, yet.

P.S. - How does one go about submitting a recording? I have been recording with my SV-3700 Panasonic DAT machine and saving my recordings as sound files on an audio program. What I'm wondering is how I can submit such files.

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Postby Rom » 2005-10-05, 2:02

Gormur wrote:P.S. - How does one go about submitting a recording? I have been recording with my SV-3700 Panasonic DAT machine and saving my recordings as sound files on an audio program. What I'm wondering is how I can submit such files.

Depends. There are several options. You can host it on your own computer with Apache HTTP server. Do you have broadband? Do you have a static ip or a dynamic ip (you can use ipconfig to determine this) (it is possible with a dynamic ip, but you need to get ip hosting)? What operating system do you have? Or you can upload it to your web host, if you don't want to have to use your own computer as a server. If you don't have a webhost, you could email it to me, and I would upload it for you.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-10-06, 4:34

I encourage all learners of Māori, that if they don't a Māori word for an English word, to just say (or write if they're writing) the sentence in Māori using good correct native speaker grammar and place the English word in the correcet place in the sentence, e.g.

I haere atu au ki te tower karaka

I went to the clock tower

And then, to remember to look up the English word in a bi-lingual dictionary to find out what the Māori equivalent is (in this case, pourewa).

You could even say -

kei runga te cow i te grass

which, in proper Māori would be - kei runga te kau i te wao.

I also tell others that when they write an essay that has to be in the Māori language, to write it straight in to the Māori language, instead of doing a translation from English. It takes twice as long when doing it from the English language.
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Postby Karavinka » 2005-10-06, 20:20

After half a decade of speaking English daily, my Korean pronounciation is slightly affected by English. For example, ㅈ(j) often becomes like /z/ and my ㄹ(l) is somewhere between /l/ and /r/. I also stopped making distinction between ㅐ/ae/ and ㅔ/e/ long time ago.

English words in my Korean kept increasing for the first few years, but now I consciously try to reduce the amount of English words. I still rely heavily on English words when I speak Japanese, though. When I can't think of the Japanese word, I say it in English with Japanese pronounciation.;)
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Postby Car » 2005-10-06, 20:52

noir wrote:I still rely heavily on English words when I speak Japanese, though. When I can't think of the Japanese word, I say it in English with Japanese pronounciation.;)


Considering how many English words there are in Japanese, your chances to have picked one which they use isn't that bad after all, it seems (I'm just a beginner, though). ;)
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Postby Gormur » 2005-10-07, 2:12

But there are many false friends in Japanese too. :D

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ZombiekE
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Postby ZombiekE » 2005-10-07, 15:32

svenska84, when I read your sentence with the verb "grab" I understood "burn" too and I wasn't translating in my mind by then xD

lol @ ser greedy xD
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