The use of the word "like"

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Stan
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The use of the word "like"

Postby Stan » 2005-06-18, 0:39

According to this article, the word "like" can be used as a noun, verb, adverb, adjective, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

:wink:
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Postby Geist » 2005-06-18, 1:35

And it is, in everyday teenage American English.
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Postby Stan » 2005-06-18, 2:01

Geist wrote:And it is, in everyday teenage American English.

Are you trying to say I use it that way? FYI I don't.
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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-06-18, 3:01

Stancel wrote:
Geist wrote:And it is, in everyday teenage American English.

Are you trying to say I use it that way? FYI I don't.


:?

Where did that come from, Stancel? Are you the only American teenager or something? Geist is a teenager also. I'm a teenager too. Lighten up.
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Postby Stan » 2005-06-18, 5:07

reflexsilver86 wrote:
Stancel wrote:
Geist wrote:And it is, in everyday teenage American English.

Are you trying to say I use it that way? FYI I don't.


:?

Where did that come from, Stancel? Are you the only American teenager or something? Geist is a teenager also. I'm a teenager too. Lighten up.

sorry about that. :wink:

But languages should evolve, so whether we like it or not, like will be used frequently by like so many people in like about 500 years in the future, so we should like, you know, like calm down about the use of the word like.

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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-06-18, 6:11

I admittedly use it more than I'd like to. Particularly when I'm recounting a conversation. I say "And I'm like (...) and she was like (...)"

I personally think it's better than those people who say "And he was all (...) and she's all (...)"

I never quite understood that. But then some can't understand the "like" thing.

The funniest thing is when you intentionally focus on how many times someone says it in conversation, and keep count. It can drive anyone insane. LOL
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Re: The use of the word "like"

Postby ekalin » 2005-06-18, 20:07

Stancel wrote:According to this article, the word "like" can be used as a noun, verb, adverb, adjective, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

:wink:


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Postby Erica » 2005-06-18, 20:50

Actually, I don't think teenagers use the word "like" as much as some peple say we do. I mean I know we use it a lot, but we don't use it every ohter word as some people say we do.

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Postby Kirk » 2005-06-18, 21:58

Geist wrote:And it is, in everyday teenage American English.


It's definitely not just teenagers. At least here, I hear speakers up to middle-aged people (tho not everyone) using "like" in all different ways.

I, for one, am an unashamed user of "like." It's a very useful word and in its nontraditional constructions fills some semantic voids with remarkable utility. For example, when I say something like

"and so I was like, "how about no?"

I don't have to specify if that was something I actually said or what I was thinking/my inner attitude at the moment. It's surprisingly useful in everyday conversation.

Several linguistic studies have come out recently on the use of the word "like" for nontraditional purposes--pretty interesting research if you get the chance to read it (I'll try and see if any of the research has been posted online).

When I was living in Buenos Aires I became familiar with the "like" equivalent there, "tipo," "tipo que," or "tipo nada" ("tipo na'"). What was funny was that like here, people often made fun of the use of "tipo" in those senses but then didn't realize when they did it themselves, as I heard my Argentine friends use it and not even realize it ;)

There's a popular Argentine TV show "No hay 2 sin 3" that has a segment called "Ricos y Mocosos" that exaggerates and pokes fun at its usage, If anyone's curious (and knows Spanish) I found a fan page of the site:

http://www.milinkito.com/archivos/000809.php

where people wrote in using their "exaggerated" tipos in the way people sometimes use them. Here's an example of one of the posts:

"Tipo na, el programa esta buenishimo, tipo, mis amigos lo ven todos los dias y dicen que es too much... ademas tipo la rubia felicitas es lo mejor del programa... me vuelve loko. tipo na tipo.... na!!! bueno ademas quiero hacerte una pregunta a
vos... si a vos... tipo na, me da verguenza pero bueno tipo na.......... Todo bien???"

It's obviously somewhat exaggerated, as people do when they make fun of "like" in English but it more or less reflects a genuine phenomenon in Argentine Spanish. I found it useful as a sentence "filler" (altho of course it's really more than just "filler," just like "like" in English) myself when speaking Spanish there.
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Postby Geist » 2005-06-18, 23:49

There are certain circumstances where (at least in my opinion) "like" has evolved a subtlety of meaning not expressible in English with other constructions - for example, "There were, like, a dozen people there." (awkward in writing, but natural in speech) shows uncertainty or approximation regarding the number of people to a greater extent than a word like "about" would. I try to limit myself to these kinds of untraditional but useful "like" phrases, but I do fall into the "she was like,..." trap more often than I'd...like. :wink:
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Postby JackFrost » 2005-06-19, 0:32

You guys are, like, getting on, like, my nevres, like, with so many "likes". :P
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Postby Stan » 2005-06-19, 1:10

JackFrost wrote:You guys are, like, getting on, like, my nevres, like, with so many "likes". :P


Like, and we could also like be getting on your nerves too. :twisted: What's the like problem with like our love of the word like? Is it not like the most useful and versatile word in the like, 1000 or like 1500 years of English language history, so like, chill dude like the word like is like whoa, like so many people like love to say that word it's so great like WOW...........

</sarcasm> :twisted:
Last edited by Stan on 2005-06-19, 6:39, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-06-19, 4:37

Well I made a point of listening closely when we were out to eat with family friends this evening and my mother was telling a recount of a conversation.

While I would have said "and he was like "blah blah blah" She never once said this. She always said "He said," and "and she said" and so on. I say this too, but she never said like once. Nor did any of the other people in their 40s or 50s at the table. It's definitely more popular among the younger generation, I would say.
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Postby Kirk » 2005-06-19, 5:58

reflexsilver86 wrote:Well I made a point of listening closely when we were out to eat with family friends this evening and my mother was telling a recount of a conversation.

While I would have said "and he was like "blah blah blah" She never once said this. She always said "He said," and "and she said" and so on. I say this too, but she never said like once. Nor did any of the other people in their 40s or 50s at the table. It's definitely more popular among the younger generation, I would say.


I agree it's definitely weighted towards younger speakers, but I have noticed middle-aged people occasionally saying it too.
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Postby JoeK » 2005-06-19, 9:49

Like is such a useful word in rapid speech.

Which is faster?:

"He said something along the lines of...."

or

"He said, like....

"His demeanor directly reflected his response, which was..."

or

"He was like...."

It's like I like 'like' like a brother.

<i>oh god, I can't even tell if I'm spelling the word correctly anymore....</i>

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Postby Kirk » 2005-06-21, 20:41

JoeK wrote:It's like I like 'like' like a brother.


Haha. Clever.
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby Kazimer » 2005-06-22, 22:43

I'm 16 and I don't use the word like that much. Like used as any other than a verb or in a simile is what most people I know refer to it as 'Valley English'. Recently I have not heard it used as much as say in the 90's when it was like almost like every other like word like like.

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Postby Erica » 2005-07-04, 20:14

Everyone says "the" a lot, and no one complains about that.


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