Syrup

Moderator: JackFrost

Does your pronunciation of the first syllable of "syrup" rhyme with:

"see"
11
38%
"sir"
10
34%
other
8
28%
 
Total votes: 29

Steve

Syrup

Postby Steve » 2005-06-12, 23:00

I pronounce ''syrup'' as ''sur up'' with the vowel in ''bird'', ''burn'' and ''fir'', not ''seerup''.

Don

Pronunciation of ''syrup'' in South Wales.

Postby Don » 2005-06-13, 0:52

Geist wrote:
There doesn't seem to be any geographic pattern regarding the pronunciation of "syrup" - it really does differ from individual to individual.

Right. It doesn't to be as regional a difference as some words or pronunciations, but I would imagine region still plays some role in many cases. I almost always hear "sir"-up [ˈs3˞əp] here in California, but a few people do say "sear"-up [ˈsɪɹəp].[/quote]

That's interesting, svenska84. In my accent ''syrup'' is not pronounced ''sir up'' not ''sear up'', but with the sound of the ''irr'' in ''mirror'' plus ''up''. i.e. /sIr@p/. I'm from South Wales. Are you Kirk from Antimoon? If you're not, but you've been to antimoon, you've probably seen me post there.

User avatar
Kirk
Posts: 2607
Joined: 2005-05-26, 19:43
Real Name: Kirk
Gender: male
Location: Los Angeles
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Pronunciation of ''syrup'' in South Wales.

Postby Kirk » 2005-06-13, 2:04

Don wrote:That's interesting, svenska84. In my accent ''syrup'' is not pronounced ''sir up'' not ''sear up'', but with the sound of the ''irr'' in ''mirror'' plus ''up''. i.e. /sIr@p/. I'm from South Wales. Are you Kirk from Antimoon? If you're not, but you've been to antimoon, you've probably seen me post there.


Hey Don--yup, it's me :) Yeah, it's relatively common (tho certainly not universal) to say "sir-up" in North America.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

User avatar
Geist
Posts: 819
Joined: 2004-07-21, 18:02
Location: New York, US

Postby Geist » 2005-06-13, 3:33

svenska84 wrote:
Geist wrote:
Stancel wrote:Some people (especially TV new journalists) will pronounce the -stan in Uzbekistan as "stahn".


As opposed to what?


I would guess as opposed to having "-stan" rhyme with "can." So, in IPA [stæn] as compared to [stɑn].

I see. :) I have heard it that way (though not in my region), now that you mention it.
Das ganze Meer verändert sich, wenn ein Stein hineingeworfen wird.
- Blaise Pascal

English, Deutsch, Español

Learning: Polski, Русский

JoeK
Posts: 14
Joined: 2005-06-13, 3:37
Real Name: Joe Kelly
Gender: male
Location: san antonio
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby JoeK » 2005-06-13, 5:32

reading this tripped me out.

I say "syrup" as either "seer-up," "sur-up," or even "s'yurup"

in the third, "yurup" sounding like "Europe."

Upon further research I found this one out: My mother has always said it as "sur-up," and my father as "seer-up." She comes from a town in Texas with no discernible accent whatsoever -- it's so flat they even lack inflection, and he from a town in Illinois where people say "he spilt oynch koyl-ait in tha cah."

These people have really screwed me up.

<i>Not withstanding the fact that I also come from a town where people say "crown" instead of "Crayon," and "meer-oh" instead of "mirror."</i>

User avatar
Kirk
Posts: 2607
Joined: 2005-05-26, 19:43
Real Name: Kirk
Gender: male
Location: Los Angeles
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby Kirk » 2005-06-14, 3:52

JoeK wrote:reading this tripped me out.

I say "syrup" as either "seer-up," "sur-up," or even "s'yurup"

in the third, "yurup" sounding like "Europe."

Upon further research I found this one out: My mother has always said it as "sur-up," and my father as "seer-up." She comes from a town in Texas with no discernible accent whatsoever -- it's so flat they even lack inflection, and he from a town in Illinois where people say "he spilt oynch koyl-ait in tha cah."

These people have really screwed me up.

<i>Not withstanding the fact that I also come from a town where people say "crown" instead of "Crayon," and "meer-oh" instead of "mirror."</i>


I lived in the Dallas-Ft.Worth metro area for several years as a kid and heard "crown" for "crayon" commonly there. Then when we moved to California the kids just called them "colors." :)

Your pronunciatin of "syrup" is pretty interesting. But I'm gonna be a picky linguist and remind you all places have accents, so maybe by "no discernible accent" you mean it doesn't sound "Texan," instead being closer to that nebulous concept of "General American." Anyway, that was my experience in the DFW metro area, as well--overall I don't remember the accents sounding very stereotypically "Texan," altho there were exceptions, of course.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

JoeK
Posts: 14
Joined: 2005-06-13, 3:37
Real Name: Joe Kelly
Gender: male
Location: san antonio
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby JoeK » 2005-06-16, 8:32

I guess by "no discernible accent" I meant an El Paso accent. :wink:

User avatar
Kirk
Posts: 2607
Joined: 2005-05-26, 19:43
Real Name: Kirk
Gender: male
Location: Los Angeles
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby Kirk » 2005-06-16, 9:07

JoeK wrote:I guess by "no discernible accent" I meant an El Paso accent. :wink:


Yeah, El Paso may as well be considered the Southwest, as it's barely in Texas anyway. I haven't spent considerable time in El Paso (tho I passed thru it often on Intersate 10 while going from Dallas-Ft.Worth to visit our relatives in Phoenix when my family was still living in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area) but I would bet its dialectal features sound more Southwestern or Western than what is typically thought of as "Texan" (which obviously, for better or worse, many Texans don't even speak).

I need to do a dialectal road trip thru the US and Canada someday. I wanna analyze as many different regional accents as I can. In my daily life I almost exclusively come into contact with Californians so the chances I've had to be out of state or to meet people here from out of state I've always been eager to listen and see what they do the same or differently as compared to people here.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

User avatar
Kirk
Posts: 2607
Joined: 2005-05-26, 19:43
Real Name: Kirk
Gender: male
Location: Los Angeles
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby Kirk » 2005-06-16, 19:19

Daniel wrote:In the UK, we say 'poh-tay-toh' but 'toh-mah-toh'. :wink:

Yes, we are very strange. :roll:


Yes, I always thought that was a fun characteristic of UK English. Variation in /æ/ and /ɑ/ can be interesting in different English-speaking countries. My Canadian relatives say /pæstə/ and /lævə/ for "pasta" and "lava" while I have /pɑstə/ and /lɑvə/. I believe I've heard UK speakers use /pæstə/, as well.
Image
'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks


Return to “English”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest