Syrup

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Does your pronunciation of the first syllable of "syrup" rhyme with:

"see"
11
38%
"sir"
10
34%
other
8
28%
 
Total votes: 29

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Geist
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Syrup

Postby Geist » 2005-05-06, 3:35

A friend of mine and I conducted an informal survey at school about this the other day. So, here's the question for Unilang: How do you pronounce "syrup"? Are you a native English speaker? Where are you from? Does your current pronunciation of the word reflect the way you were taught to pronounce it in your youth, or is it an adopted pronunciation?

I'm a native speaker; I've grown up in the northeast US, and I (like my parents and their parents), pronounce "syrup" as if its first syllable rhymes with "see".

I'm sorry I can't describe the sound relationships better - that area of linguistics is not (yet) my speciality. :oops:
Das ganze Meer verändert sich, wenn ein Stein hineingeworfen wird.
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-05-06, 6:19

I'm not a native speaker (my first language is Portuguese), and I wouldn't really know when or how I was taught the pronunciation of syrup. I pronounce it with a short i, like the i in sick, sin or sit.
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Postby Nukalurk » 2005-05-06, 7:13

I'm not a native speaker but I pronounce it "see.."; so nearly like in German where it's "zee...".

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Car
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Postby Car » 2005-05-06, 8:28

I was never taught it, but I'd pronounce it as "see".
Please correct my mistakes!

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Postby dorenda » 2005-05-06, 9:02

I'm a native speaker of Dutch and I have no idea where I was taught how to pronounce this word (if I ever was). I pronounce it like Psi-Lord, so with a short i.

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Postby Le Serpent Rouge » 2005-05-06, 17:59

I say “sir”, just an influence of where I grew up. I don’t know anyone who says “see”.
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Postby Mark W » 2005-05-06, 19:34

I always say syrup with the "see" pronunciation, though I've heard both. I've also heard differing pronunciations when people say "zero".

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Re: Syrup

Postby JackFrost » 2005-05-06, 20:52

Geist wrote:How do you pronounce "syrup"? Are you a native English speaker? Where are you from? Does your current pronunciation of the word reflect the way you were taught to pronounce it in your youth, or is it an adopted pronunciation?[/size]

"Sir-up"

Yes I'm a native speaker from the northeastern US. Yes it reflects how I was taught in my youth. ;)

Funny, I never heard anyone saying it as "see-rup" :shock:
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Postby Stan » 2005-05-07, 0:15

I pronounce it as "sir-up".
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Postby alois » 2005-05-07, 1:35

I'm not a native speaker either, but I would pronounce it like "sir-up".

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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-05-07, 3:04

I say it closer to "seerup" It's definitely not anywhere near "surrup"

I'm from Long Island, but then I no longer have a New York accent so I'm not indicative... however we still pronounced it like that there.
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Postby bluechiron » 2005-05-08, 2:57

I'm from the South where we say sear-up; in the Midwest it's sir-up
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Re: Syrup

Postby Kirk » 2005-05-27, 10:13

Geist wrote:A friend of mine and I conducted an informal survey at school about this the other day. So, here's the question for Unilang: How do you pronounce "syrup"? Are you a native English speaker? Where are you from? Does your current pronunciation of the word reflect the way you were taught to pronounce it in your youth, or is it an adopted pronunciation?

I'm a native speaker; I've grown up in the northeast US, and I (like my parents and their parents), pronounce "syrup" as if its first syllable rhymes with "see".

I'm sorry I can't describe the sound relationships better - that area of linguistics is not (yet) my speciality. :oops:


I'm a native speaker from California and say the first vowel in "syrup" with the same vowel in "sir" or "fur" so I say [ˈs3˞əp] for those familiar with IPA. I grew up saying it this way (both of my parents are California natives and say [ˈs3˞əp]) and that's how I hear the vast majority of people here pronounce it, but I have heard it to rhyme with "cheer up." I've never considered changing my pronunciation of it, tho, as I'm quite content with [ˈs3˞əp]. :)

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Postby Moonshadow » 2005-06-02, 3:54

I'm a native speaker, originally from the Midwest (Cincinnati, Ohio), and I've always said "seerup". I think the first time I ever heard "sirrup" was on TV, because everybody I remember speaking to personally said "seerup" as well.

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Postby linglover » 2005-06-06, 3:02

Well I'm from north carolina, born and raised, and I pronounce it "sir-up." or more accurately - "sirp" :)

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Postby Stan » 2005-06-06, 3:08

sir-up seems to be more common (I use it as well). It's like that old saying "you say poh-tay-toh, I say poh-tah-toh, you say toh-may-toh, I say toh-mah-toh."

There are all sorts of these words with differences in pronunciation, that vary from place to place. Some people (especially TV new journalists) will pronounce the -stan in Uzbekistan as "stahn".
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Postby JackFrost » 2005-06-07, 1:33

Tomayto,potayto. Very common here. :P

Tomahto, potahto...are very Southern to me.
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Postby Stan » 2005-06-07, 1:38

JackFrost wrote:Tomayto,potayto. Very common here. :P

Tomahto, potahto...are very Southern to me.

Actually, you will never hear "tomahto" around here. I think it's more of a British thing.
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Postby Geist » 2005-06-07, 2:50

Stancel wrote:Some people (especially TV new journalists) will pronounce the -stan in Uzbekistan as "stahn".


As opposed to what?

There doesn't seem to be any geographic pattern regarding the pronunciation of "syrup" - it really does differ from individual to individual. :wink:
Das ganze Meer verändert sich, wenn ein Stein hineingeworfen wird.

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Kirk
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Postby Kirk » 2005-06-07, 3:43

Geist wrote:
Stancel wrote:Some people (especially TV new journalists) will pronounce the -stan in Uzbekistan as "stahn".


As opposed to what?


I would guess as opposed to having "-stan" rhyme with "can." So, in IPA [stæn] as compared to [stɑn].

Geist wrote:There doesn't seem to be any geographic pattern regarding the pronunciation of "syrup" - it really does differ from individual to individual. :wink:


Right. It doesn't to be as regional a difference as some words or pronunciations, but I would imagine region still plays some role in many cases. I almost always hear "sir"-up [ˈs3˞əp] here in California, but a few people do say "sear"-up [ˈsɪɹəp].
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