Could this soon be an integral part of English?

Moderator: JackFrost

D'you think the abbreviation "ASAP" could soon become an integral English term like "ok"?

Yes, I do think so. It might happen soon.
15
45%
No, I don't think that's possible.
5
15%
Perhaps it might happen - it will probably take ages and ages, though.
13
39%
 
Total votes: 33

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Gong Sun Hao Ran
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Could this soon be an integral part of English?

Postby Gong Sun Hao Ran » 2005-03-08, 5:02

Perhaps the way I phrased my topic is a little off - here's what I want to know anyway - if it is possible that the commonly used abbreviation ASAP could soon be used so often that it becomes "asap" and turns into an English word i.e. people would use "asap" as a word meaning "as soon as possible; as fast as one can".
I was wondering if it could gain such a "prestigious" status (rather like the word 'ok', which has become used so often that people use it without knowing its origins). I saw it being used in the subtitles of a Chinese TV programme. It got me thinking because I was quite surprised that the translators used "ASAP" instead of "as soon as possible". I doubt it was to save space because it wasn't a very long sentence.
I'm taking this as a sign that the abbreviation ASAP is slowly 'evolving' into an English word. What do you think?

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-03-08, 14:10

You have a good point there. But often enough in written sentences such as reports or newspapers, it's preferred to write everything down instead of just ASAP, since it won't look good if you use the short, quick form. ASAP is often found in ads, quick notes, e-mails, and anything needed to be paid attention quickly. We don't say..."get that done ASAP!" in spoken language, instead we say it all out. So there's kind of "unoffical" rule when using the short form and the long form. ;)
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Postby Hao_Ran_not_logged_in » 2005-03-08, 15:05

With regards to your statement about ASAP not being used in spoken language, I have heard people say it before. Usually it's in a situation when the person is getting uptight about having the thing done within the shortest amount of time it can be squeezed into - so things go like "I WANT it done ASAP! GRR!" or something similar.

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-03-08, 15:24

Well, I never heard it in my life in spoken langauge! (I'm a native speaker.) Maybe except for a couple cases on TV, but you can't expect our lives just like on sitcoms. ;)

But hey, I'm not going to doubt that. Perhaps it depends where you live. :D
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-03-08, 17:27

Maybe LOL makes it first—I've heard of internet-addicted people laughing like that. :roll:
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Postby ekalin » 2005-03-08, 18:13

Does it make any real difference? It will be used the same way it is now, official or not.
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Postby Car » 2005-03-08, 21:07

Psi-Lord wrote:Maybe LOL makes it first—I've heard of internet-addicted people laughing like that. :roll:


Yes, I've heard that, too.

As for ASAP, I doubt it. And if it does, it will take a lot of time.
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Postby sa wulfs » 2005-03-08, 21:42

I guess everything could happen (that's what's wonderful about languages), but I haven't seen ASAP or LOL out of their internet slang niches so I think that at any rate it will still take a long time.

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Postby Lauura » 2005-03-08, 22:02

Well, I guess ASAP stands the same chances as AFAIK (as far as I know), FYI (for your information), IMO (in my opinion) and so on...
I don't know... I don't think they'll make it into the spoken language; at least not massively.
That is: IMO, that's just Inet slang, and besides, AFAIK, those expressions aren't used orally. But of course, I'll be the first one in LOLing or even ROFLing if they should become officially a part of the lang. :lol:
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Postby Geist » 2005-03-09, 1:45

JackFrost wrote:Well, I never heard it in my life in spoken langauge! (I'm a native speaker.) Maybe except for a couple cases on TV, but you can't expect our lives just like on sitcoms.

But hey, I'm not going to doubt that. Perhaps it depends where you live.

I hear it many times each day in normal speech, though not nearly as often as OK. Demographics, I guess. :)
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Postby bluechiron » 2005-03-09, 2:33

In the US South and Midwest, you say ASAP and never "as soon as possible." So although I voted that it might integrate into the language soon, it's already in wide usage and used on the television.
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Postby bluechiron » 2005-03-09, 2:35

Just to comment on an earlier post, LOL is also frequently (and becoming even more frequently) used by US teenagers. You also hear ROFL although it usually sounds like roflo.
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Postby reflexsilver86 » 2005-03-09, 2:49

You know what's scary, I have, on more than one occasion when I've been really amused by something, been ready to say "LOL" aloud. I guess it's just a matter of time before that little abbreviation sinks into our minds so deeply it starts coming out in speech! :shock:
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Postby darkina » 2005-03-10, 10:47

reflexsilver86 wrote:You know what's scary, I have, on more than one occasion when I've been really amused by something, been ready to say "LOL" aloud. I guess it's just a matter of time before that little abbreviation sinks into our minds so deeply it starts coming out in speech! :shock:


well it almost happened to me too a couple of times... or i was about to use it on messenger with people who never entered a chat or a forum so they wouldnt know it...

as for ASAP, well do people really say it??? I would have never expected that... but if people use it talking and not only writing it has a chance...though I somehow hope not... After all, it might just go out of fashion and be forgotten in the oral usage, while remaining a nice abbreviation for us internet addicts with not enough time to spell words correctly ;)
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Postby kibo » 2005-03-10, 11:12

Well, for me, when I see ASAP I read that in my mind as "As Soon As Possible". The same happens with AFAIK (As Far As I Know) and RO(T)FL (Rolling On The Floor Laughing). But with LOL I never read it as "Laughing Out Loud", I always read it as "lol". I even use words like "to lol" and "loling". I never laugh this way in public though. (not yet... :P)
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Postby Dardallion » 2005-03-10, 14:22

I very much doubt that ASAP will become part of British English anytime soon. In fact, I have only ever heard it said by Americans, and most of them were on television or in films. As to the other abbreviations, LOL certainly has a good chance, though I myself can't stand it as it is so ambiguous, with multiple meanings. I'm not so sure about ROFL, and I am almost certain AFAIK will never be part of English.

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Postby lazy_lillekvinne » 2005-03-10, 18:22

I never hear ASAP in everyday life...and I'm a native speaker from the us....its only on tv that I hear it..

as a matter of fact I didn't even know what it meant until I heard the utada hikaru song 'asap' and I looked it up :oops:

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Postby Stan » 2005-03-10, 22:44

I have heard ASAP in common speech several times, spelled out as "a-s-a-p", very rarely will you hear someone say "a-sap".
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Postby Geist » 2005-03-11, 0:48

I hear them both, quite often. Probably a regional variation.
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Postby Ozymandias » 2005-03-11, 1:03

Yeah, I hear quite often too. It's not as common as OK, but, then again, it wouldn't be needed as much.


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