IpseDixit - English

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby modus.irrealis » 2015-03-21, 20:29

Just to add that it means "directly north", since "to the north" could be understood more vaguely.

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-22, 21:36

Can I say something live "we're moving/driving/walking due north"?

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-22, 21:40

IpseDixit wrote:Can I say something live "we're moving/driving/walking due north"?

Absolutely. It's particularly common to say "We're heading/headed due north".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-22, 21:44

Thanks!

(and I meant like, not live)

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 11:37

I have three new questions:

To border something
To border on something
To border with something

Are all of them correct? And if so, is there any difference?

---

Are us two and the two of us interchangeable?

---

I'm reading a novel and I can't wrap my head around this passage:

It wasn't every day a single fight decided the fate of the world. It was every day at noon and again at sunset, and the general public had to pay to watch.

I really don't know what I'm supposed to understand from those two sentences that seemingly contradict each other...

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby Lazar Taxon » 2015-03-23, 13:28

IpseDixit wrote:I have three new questions:

To border something
To border on something
To border with something

Are all of them correct? And if so, is there any difference?

To border something is used for pieces of land: "France borders Belgium," "My property borders hers." To border on something is used in a conceptual sense, and is similar to to verge on something: "His thinking borders on the delusional," "His actions bordered on treason," "This proposal borders on the absurd." As you can see, it's often followed by "the [adj.]". To border with something isn't used.

Are us two and the two of us interchangeable?

They both mean the same thing, but the two of us is more standard, whereas us two is very informal.

It wasn't every day a single fight decided the fate of the world. It was every day at noon and again at sunset, and the general public had to pay to watch.

I think the author worded it this way in order to humorously misdirect the reader. The first sentence seems to imply that such fights are rare, but the second sentence subverts this meaning. The author is saying, "These fights don't happen [once] every day; they happen twice every day!"
Last edited by Lazar Taxon on 2015-03-23, 13:45, edited 2 times in total.
Native: [flag=]en-us[/flag] Good: [flag=]es[/flag] [flag=]fr[/flag] Okay: [flag=]de[/flag] [flag=]la[/flag] Beginning: [flag=]it[/flag] Interested in: [flag=]he[/flag] [flag=]hi[/flag] [flag=]ru[/flag]

Today we are cats in the apocalypse!

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 13:50

Oh, I see.

Thanks a lot!

---

Another ones:

-are in that way and that way both correct?

-I've found the expression do someone proud and now I wonder why do instead of make.

-which one is correct? do one's interest(s), make one's interest(s) or neither one?
Last edited by IpseDixit on 2015-03-23, 14:35, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 14:20

IpseDixit wrote:Another one: are "in that way" and "that way" both correct?
Depends on context. I wouldn't use them interchangeably.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 14:30

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Another one: are "in that way" and "that way" both correct?
Depends on context. I wouldn't use them interchangeably.

I don't have any contexts. Can you give me a general rule?
(Also, I added two more questions in the previous post)

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 14:39

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Another one: are "in that way" and "that way" both correct?
Depends on context. I wouldn't use them interchangeably.

I don't have any contexts. Can you give me general rule?
(Also, I added two more questions in the previous post)
I'm sorry, I can't. It's not something I've ever given any thought to before, so I'd need to collect a lot of data before I could deduce any sort of party.

As a first approximation, I think in that way can only refer to manner, not actual direction. Cf.

(1) "Go that way!"
(2) *"Go in that way!"
(3) "Don't look at me that way!"
(4) "Don't look at me in that way!"

Of the last two examples, (3) is definitely a more common phrasing than (4). I've been trying to think of cases where only in that way works, but I haven't been successful yet. The closest I've come is:

(5) I don't love him that way.
(6) I don't love him in that way.

(6) sounds better to me. (5) is odd, as if you're talking about the concrete methods of loving you use rather than the general nature of your love. But context could easily force the same interpretation of both sentences.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby Dormouse559 » 2015-03-23, 15:31

IpseDixit wrote:-I've found the expression do someone proud and now I wonder why do instead of make.
"Do" sounds informal, a little dialectal, whereas "make" is fairly neutral, but both are correct.

IpseDixit wrote:-which one is correct? do one's interest(s), make one's interest(s) or neither one?
Neither of them sounds right to me.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 15:39

Dormouse559 wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:-which one is correct? do one's interest(s), make one's interest(s) or neither one?
Neither of them sounds right to me.
I'm not even sure what the intended meaning is. Practice one's hobbies? Act in accordance with one's own interests?
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 15:59

linguoboy wrote: Act in accordance with one's own interests?

Yep. What should I say then?

Dormouse559 wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:-I've found the expression do someone proud and now I wonder why do instead of make.
"Do" sounds informal, a little dialectal, whereas "make" is fairly neutral, but both are correct.

Is that a fixed expression used only with proud or can it be used with any other adjective?
Last edited by IpseDixit on 2015-03-23, 16:06, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby Dormouse559 » 2015-03-23, 16:05

You're right, it's only used with "proud".
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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 16:24

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote: Act in accordance with one's own interests?

Yep. What should I say then?
In an informal context, I would say "looking out for oneself".

IpseDixit wrote:Is that a fixed expression used only with proud or can it be used with any other adjective?
Not generally, no. But you can do someone wrong (though you do right by them) and do someone like that.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 16:26

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote: Act in accordance with one's own interests?

Yep. What should I say then?
In an informal context, I would say "looking out for oneself".

And in a formal one? Is there anything shorter than "act in accordance with one's own interests?"

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 16:29

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote: Act in accordance with one's own interests?
Yep. What should I say then?
In an informal context, I would say "looking out for oneself".
And in a formal one? Is there anything shorter than "act in accordance with one's own interests?"
Maybe "serve one's own interests"?
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 16:52

Ok.

Sorry for today's shitload of questions but I'd have another one... :whistle: ^^"

I don't understand what this means:

-They're the only witnesses we've got, for all the good they'll do us.
Last edited by IpseDixit on 2015-03-23, 17:00, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-03-23, 16:55

IpseDixit wrote:They're the only witnesses we've got, for all the good they'll do us.
Expresses the speaker's opinion that they won't actually do any good. See: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/for_all.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2015-03-23, 17:04

I don't get it though.

If for all = despite, doesn't "despite all the good they'll do us" mean that they are actually going to do good?


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