Please explain me.

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Dormouse559 » 2014-06-20, 6:29

"Forever" is the typical term. "Forevermore" is a poetic/archaic synonym.
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby linguoboy » 2014-06-20, 14:43

Dormouse559 wrote:"Forever" is the typical term. "Forevermore" is a poetic/archaic synonym.

Near-synonym, I would say. You can't use it with a past or perfect verb, can you?
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Dormouse559 » 2014-06-20, 17:07

I agree that it doesn't work with perfect verbs, but past verbs? Yes. "He lived as a beast forevermore".
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby LifeDeath » 2014-06-22, 11:37

Why doesn't a perfect work that way? "He's lived as a beast forevermore".

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby linguoboy » 2014-06-22, 13:27

LifeDeath wrote:Why doesn't a perfect work that way? "He's lived as a beast forevermore".

Because the time period encompassed by the present perfect only continues up to the present moment whereas adding the "more" to "forever" explicitly makes it extend into the future.
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Perceptor » 2014-07-18, 12:13

Hello. Can you explain to me what does "jump in line" mean? I heard this phrase several times. Maybe it means: "to understand something" or "to stop thinking about something" or something else?

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby linguoboy » 2014-07-18, 12:24

Perceptor wrote:Hello. Can you explain to me what does "jump in line" mean? I heard this phrase several times. Maybe it means: "to understand something" or "to stop thinking about something" or something else?

You can't provide any context?

I can think of at least two possible meanings: to join a queue or, specifically, to move to a position in a queue that is further forward than one is entitled to. (What is more commonly called "cutting" or "butting".) Your suggestions don't sound plausible to me in the least, but this could be some idiom I'm not familiar with.
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Re: Please explain to me.

Postby Perceptor » 2014-07-18, 14:00

I found it in a Onerepublic's song "Secrets'. I took that fragment from this song's part:
"This time don't need another perfect lie
Don't care if critics ever jump in line
I'm gonna give all my secrets away"

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Re: Please explain to me.

Postby linguoboy » 2014-07-18, 14:27

Perceptor wrote:I found it in a Onerepublic's song "Secrets'. I took that fragment from this song's part:
"This time don't need another perfect lie
Don't care if critics ever jump in line
I'm gonna give all my secrets away"

Hmm...maybe he means "fall into line"? That's a metaphor from Army service, where it means to line up shoulder to shoulder for inspection. The line is supposed to be perfectly straight, so it used in extended sense to mean "share the same opinion". Cf. "toe the line".

Other interpretations, anyone?
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby LifeDeath » 2014-07-18, 19:07

"This time don't need another perfect lie". What does that line mean? Is "we" implied after the word "time"? If not, isn't the word "time" an unplural form? Shouldn't it be "time doesn't"? Or maybe I'm goofing.

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby linguoboy » 2014-07-18, 19:34

LifeDeath wrote:"This time don't need another perfect lie". What does that line mean? Is "we" implied after the word "time"? If not, isn't the word "time" a non-plural[*] form? Shouldn't it be "time doesn't"? Or maybe I'm goofing.

With nothing more to go on, I would assume the pronoun "I", although "we" might work as well or better in context.

In colloquial speech, "don't" can be used with singular subjects. This is originally a dialect feature but it isn't uncommon to hear it in rock songs.

[*] "singular"
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Re: Please explain to me.

Postby Perceptor » 2014-07-18, 21:37

Someone translated this as "to pounce on the idea". That's all what I could find about it.

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Perceptor » 2014-07-22, 5:23

Freddie Mercury has a song "It's so you". What does this expression mean?

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Michael » 2014-07-22, 5:53

Perceptor wrote:Freddie Mercury has a song "It's so you". What does this expression mean?

It means that something is reminiscent of the character in the song.
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Re: Please explain to me.

Postby Perceptor » 2016-11-11, 18:46

Hi! I have another one question. In many games I played there're strange phrases I heard for example: "not enough mana" or not have enough mana". Is it right and if it's so then may i say "not have enought money on my card" or "not enough money on my card" or smth else?

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby LifeDeath » 2016-11-12, 17:29

I guess that both the first and the last one sound perfectly fine as written. Belonging to a formal register they can be used, accordingly, in banks, for exapmle. "Not enough money on my card." is just a shorter version of "There is not enough money on my card.", with omitted "there is". Ir that right?
But I can't say for sure whether options with "have" correct or not, so what do native speakers think?

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Re: Please explain to me.

Postby OyVey » 2016-11-14, 5:57

Perceptor wrote:Hi! I have another one question. In many games I played there're strange phrases I heard for example: "not enough mana" or not have enough mana". Is it right and if it's so then may i say "not have enought money on my card" or "not enough money on my card" or smth else?
To me, "Not enough mana" would be fine in the context of a game--you try to do an action and the game says "Not enough mana". A game might also say "Insufficient money" or "Access Denied", or "Access Granted". None of which would work in a conversation though.

*"not have enought money on my card" Incorrect. It should be "I don't have enough money on my card." Even *"I not have enought money on my card" would be incorrect.

*"not enough money on my card" Sounds incomplete. "I don't have enough money on my card" or "There isn't enough money on my card."

You couldn't tell your friend for instance "Not enough mana." It wouldn't make sense. You'd have to say "You don't have enough mana."
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby LifeDeath » 2016-11-14, 9:04

And what if my friend asks me and we have a conversation:
"Will you make a payment now?"
"No."
"You sure? Maybe you will? What's the reason?"
"No, sorry, not enough money on my card".

Is that an appropriate answer? OyVey said it sounds incomplete, but what about this case? It sounds natural to me, (and I even used sentences like that, like "Not a lot of people came there") but your experience is many times as bigger, that's why I'm asking you.

And since we started talking about money, I wondered what would be a proper expression to express "add more money on one's card". Quick google search brings up "to replenish an account". Is that option correct? Is it possible to say "to replenish a card"? I doubt, because, as far as I know, "account" and "card" are different things.

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Re: Please explain me.

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-11-15, 5:19

LifeDeath wrote:And what if my friend asks me and we have a conversation:
"Will you make a payment now?"
"No."
"You sure? Maybe you will? What's the reason?"
"No, sorry, not enough money on my card".

Is that an appropriate answer? OyVey said it sounds incomplete, but what about this case? It sounds natural to me, (and I have even used sentences like that, like "Not a lot of people came there") but your experience is many times as bigger. That's why I'm asking you.
Your proposal is correct. That's a very natural way to respond in a casual situation. (Just note that "Not enough money on my card" and "Not a lot of people came here" aren't comparable grammatically. The former is technically an incomplete sentence, "there is" having been omitted from the beginning; the latter is a complete sentence.)

LifeDeath wrote:And since we started talking about money, I wondered what would be a proper expression to express "add more money on one's card". Quick google search brings up "to replenish an account". Is that option correct? Is it possible to say "to replenish a card"? I doubt, because, as far as I know, "account" and "card" are different things.
You could use "refill" or "recharge". I feel like I'd probably say "put more money on".
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Re: Please explain me.

Postby hashi » 2016-12-07, 2:27

Dormouse559 wrote:
LifeDeath wrote:And since we started talking about money, I wondered what would be a proper expression to express "add more money on one's card". Quick google search brings up "to replenish an account". Is that option correct? Is it possible to say "to replenish a card"? I doubt, because, as far as I know, "account" and "card" are different things.
You could use "refill" or "recharge". I feel like I'd probably say "put more money on".

Might be necroposting, but I would say "top up" in this instance: "I topped up my bus card", or as Dormouse suggests "put money on", but more like: "I put twenty dollars on my bus card".
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