Anglais pour francophones

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Sarabi
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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-23, 16:14

LOL... Yeah, I understand that.
English (native); français (semi-fluent); español (basic conversational, 3 years in school + completed Duolingo tree); română (studied for a year + Duolingo Level 7); italiano (beginner; Duolingo tree completed); Deutsch (Duolingo Level 11, but I have a poor grasp of this language)

Official Dabbling History: 1.5 semesters in college nihongo; 2 semesters in college Kiswahili; 3 college linguistics classes

degree in Quenya from University of Rivendell (j.k.)

Carollline

Re: English (pour les francophonies)

Postby Carollline » 2004-12-02, 8:48

Hi !

Is it too late to start english lessons ? :oops:

How can I participate ?

caro_line_g@yahoo.fr

fanouq

english for frenchies

Postby fanouq » 2004-12-02, 8:52

Hello
I'm french and I need to practice my english.
Mais je peux aussi correspondre en français sans problème et corriger les erreurs.
Cordialement à tous. :)

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Kubi
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Postby Kubi » 2004-12-02, 14:10

Queen Ehlana wrote:Well, I must admit that I have no clue what the hell this, "Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history", means.

Well, I'd interpret it as the history of the reading of the safety radiation badge of the Washington University Hospital :)

Differently said, it's an overview of what the reading of that badge was during a certain time.
Je défendrai mes opinions jusqu'à ma mort, mais je donnerai ma vie pour que vous puissiez défendre les vôtres. - Voltaire

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JackFrost
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Postby JackFrost » 2004-12-02, 15:03

Kubi wrote:
Queen Ehlana wrote:Well, I must admit that I have no clue what the hell this, "Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history", means.

Well, I'd interpret it as the history of the reading of the safety radiation badge of the Washington University Hospital :)

Differently said, it's an overview of what the reading of that badge was during a certain time.

Exactly. ;)
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Kazimer
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Radiation Badge

Postby Kazimer » 2004-12-31, 1:40

Hey
I would like to join this forum. English is my native tongue and I'm studying French in school.

A radiaton badge is basically a piece of film that changes color when exposed to too much radiation. So that the person wearing it usually a radiation tech doesn't get exposed to a lot radiation at one time. And the history is probably a log of the techs exposed to much to radiation.

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Kubi
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Postby Kubi » 2005-01-03, 12:06

Hi phreaker, welcome! Your interpretation matches mine. And I had this idea because I was already wearing such badges during my time at CERN, so I know how they work :wink:
Je défendrai mes opinions jusqu'à ma mort, mais je donnerai ma vie pour que vous puissiez défendre les vôtres. - Voltaire

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Dardallion
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Postby Dardallion » 2005-04-22, 11:33

I'm English, with a good knowledge of French, so I'll be happy to help out with any lessons here.

I just want to go back to the discussion on noun phrases. An important thing to note here is that if you divide a sentence into subject and predicate, then the subject is considered by formal logic to be a noun phrase.

For example:

The red book was on the big table.

The bold part is the subject, which is considered a noun phrase. Note also that although the whole underlined section is the predicate, the italic section is the object, and thus another noun phrase.
As you can see, noun phrases can include adjectives, articles and in some cases, any other parts of speech, but they are still noun phrases.

This can be easily seen if we draw a tree, like so:

The red book was on the big table
/\
/ \
/ \
/ \
/ \
/ \
/ \
/ \
(subject) (predicate)
The red book was on the big table
/\ /\
/ \ / \
/ \ / \
/ \ / \
/ \ / \
/ \ / \
/ \ / \
(noun phrase) (adjective) (verb phrase) (noun phrase)
The book red was on the table
/\ /\ /\
/ \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \
(article) (noun) (verb) (preposition) (adjective) (noun phrase)
the book was on big the table
/\
/ \
/ \
/ \
(article) (noun)
the table

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Dardallion
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Postby Dardallion » 2005-04-22, 11:55

I'm English, with a good knowledge of French, so I'll be happy to help out with any lessons here.

I just want to go back to the discussion on noun phrases. An important thing to note here is that if you divide a sentence into subject and predicate, then the subject is considered by formal logic to be a noun phrase.

For example:

The red book was on the big table.

The bold part is the subject, which is considered a noun phrase. Note also that although the whole underlined section is the predicate, the italic section is the object, and thus another noun phrase.
As you can see, noun phrases can include adjectives, articles and in some cases, any other parts of speech, but they are still noun phrases.

This can be easily seen if we draw a tree, like so:

----The red book was on the big table
-----------------------/-------\
----------------------/---------\
---------------------/-----------\
--------------------/-------------\
-------------------/---------------\
------------------/-----------------\
-----------------/-------------------\
----------------/---------------------\
----------(subject)----------------(predicate)
---The red book------------------was on the big table
-----------/\-------------------------------/-----\
----------/--\-----------------------------/-------\
---------/----\---------------------------/---------\
--------/------\-------------------------/-----------\
-------/--------\-----------------------/-------------\
------/----------\---------------------/---------------\
-----/------------\-------------------/-----------------\
(noun phrase)-(adjective)---(verb phrase)-------(noun phrase)
--The book-------red------------was on-------------the table
-------/\------------------------------/\---------------------/---\
------/--\----------------------------/--\-------------------/-----\
-----/----\--------------------------/----\-----------------/-------\
----/------\------------------------/------\---------------/---------\
---/--------\----------------------/--------\-------------/---------- \
(article)--(noun)-------------(verb)-(preposition)-(adjective)-(noun phrase)
-the-------book----------------was------on-----------big-----------the table
--------------------------------------------------------------------------/\
-------------------------------------------------------------------------/--\
------------------------------------------------------------------------/----\
-----------------------------------------------------------------------/------\
----------------------------------------------------------------(article)-----(noun)
------------------------------------------------------------------the----------table

Harry

bonjour

Postby Harry » 2005-05-27, 11:11

Comment qu'on dit <watch> en anglais?

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JackFrost
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Re: bonjour

Postby JackFrost » 2005-05-27, 17:29

Harry wrote:Comment qu'on dit <watch> en anglais?

Watch comme un nom, "une montre".
Watch comme un verbe, "regarder" (I am watching TV ---> Je regarde à la télé.)
Neferuj paħujkij!

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勺园之鬼
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Re: bonjour

Postby 勺园之鬼 » 2005-05-27, 18:15

JackFrost wrote:
Harry wrote:Comment qu'on dit <watch> en anglais?

Watch comme un nom, "une montre".
Watch comme un verbe, "regarder" (I am watching TV ---> Je regarde à la télé.)


Non, c'est faux. "watch" en anglais se dit... "watch". :mrgreen:
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greg-fr
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Postby greg-fr » 2005-06-16, 6:30

Back to En <spending money>. It makes me think about Fr <toilettes hommes> & Fr <espace client> where the non-written connector between both noun pairs is Fr <pour> = En <for>.

Determiner postposition notwithstanding, Fr <toilettes hommes> & Fr <espace client> follow the same pattern as En <cash machine> & En <car park>.

Do you know phrases with the same N-N construction in both languages ?


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