Anglais pour francophones

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variedanteater
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Anglais pour francophones

Postby variedanteater » 2002-11-23, 22:03

Salut!!

Premier, bonjour a tous!! Moi, je m'appelle John, et je suis votre proffesseur d'anglais. J'habite a Leeds, en Angletterre. Je parle francais assez-courrament, alors, pardon pour mes erreurs!!

On va commence le 1 decembre, alors si vous voulez faire ces cours, repondez avant ca!!


Au revoir,


John

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Axystos
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Postby Axystos » 2002-11-28, 19:47

Well..I'm not a francophone, but I would nevertheless appreciate it if someone could show me my mistakes whenever I want to sound important and try to use too 'big' words.. :)

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sova

Postby sova » 2003-03-30, 13:16

Neither I am a francophone, but I would like to participate in this topic, just to improve both my English and my poor French.

A bientôt!

τομάκιος

correction

Postby τομάκιος » 2003-05-23, 0:23

Neither I am -> Neither am I

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Postby Ozymandias » 2003-05-24, 0:37

Ah, the pesky verb to be, one of the only verbs in English that uses inversion. I think the only other one is the verb to be able to (I can...).


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τομάκιος

re: inversion

Postby τομάκιος » 2003-05-24, 2:35

I am not familiar with the term "inversion", but I believe that I deduce the meaning. Here are some examples I have myself composed just now:

* Examples of inversion that I think sound natural

I will not bend; neither will I yield.

Have I spending money? Then I have happiness to give.

Holding you for but a moment, I would count my life fulfilled.


* Examples that I think sound a bit old-fashioned

Will a man not beg when he has no money? Shall we then condemn him? Condemn we him, we condemn the entire species, and ourselves as well.

I see no reason nor rhyme to your plan; neither see I hope that you will any such to conjure.

τομάκιος

> Have I spending money? Then I have happiness to give.

Postby τομάκιος » 2003-05-24, 2:38

> Have I spending money? Then I have happiness to give.

Rereading this, I think that it would have a nicer, more parallel sound if rewritten as:

Have I spending money? Then have I happiness to give.

Guest

Postby Guest » 2003-05-28, 22:53

The best way to say it would be 'I am not a francophone either.' You would say 'neither am I' if it was just an answer. Also, 'have I' sounds like a question to me.

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Sarabi
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Postby Sarabi » 2003-07-19, 14:15

Well, now... I need no help with my English, and I speak little French, but I think I'll join the discussion. :)

"Have I spending money?"

Are you using "spending" as an adjective? It took me more than a couple of minutes to figure that out. It just looks awkward. If I were to hear it, I might have picked that up quicker. :roll: Some people say English is easy, and some say it's one of the hardest languages to learn. I don't know, but it's true that many people my age in America (where I live) still can't get some basic rules right. :shock:
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re: spending money

Postby tomak » 2003-08-20, 21:57

I'm using a noun phrase "spending money", which is fairly common where I'm from. It means cash on hand that you are free to spend. For example:

"My daughter is at the mall with her friends. I gave her some spending money to take with her, because she cleaned up the yard as I asked her to."

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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-21, 2:09

There's no such thing as a noun phrase in English, tomak. Two nouns don't go together unless with a hyphon. "Money" would be the noun.
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On noun phrases in English, with copious examples :)

Postby tomak » 2003-08-21, 3:26

Actually noun phrases are quite common in American English.

There are thousands of web pages on the subject -- here are two:

http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/noun-phrase.html

http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/arts/wri ... rfunc.html


The latter has a nice set of examples, one of use as subject, on as object, one as subjective complement, and one as objective complement.

Many, probably most, noun phrases contain words of various types, but there are certainly noun phrases comprised entirely of nouns. For ther remainder of this post I will address exclusively noun phrases comprised entirely of nouns. These are less common in popular discourse, but are extremely common in more technical discourse. Here are some examples:

kitchen sink
bedroom door
abbey steeple
church choir
packet sniffer
radio set
automobile radio
automobile radio set
automobile radio set assembly
wire harness
dog pound
benzene ring


Actually, these examples come quite freely to me; noun phrases consisting exclusively of nouns are more common than I had realized when I started writing this explanation :)

Ah, it has just occurred to me to look for web pages devoted to long noun phrases exclusively comprised of nouns, and I have found such a one:

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/phrases.htm

They term such a noun phrase a "compound noun phrase", and give a couple other terms for it. They give a pretty example of a compound noun phrase comprised of a single adjective followed by four nouns in immediate succession:

uniform resource locator protocol problem

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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-21, 3:35

Hmm... Well, I hadn't thought of possession. :oops:

"A noun phrase consists of a pronoun or noun with any associated modifiers, including adjectives, adjective phrases, adjective clauses, and other nouns in the possessive case" from one of the links you posted.

Exactly. Both nouns in these phrases aren't working as nouns. Well, maybe in some, but I don't recognize most of those phrases, to be honest. You see, in "dog pound", "dog" sounds like an adjective to me. I don't know... maybe I'm wrong.
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Attempted eight-noun noun phrase

Postby tomak » 2003-08-21, 3:39

The longest noun phrase comprised exclusively of nouns that I've thought of -- and I've sat here thinking for a few minutes -- is

Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history

This is rather a stretch, I admit. Here is what I have in mind:

"I was in the administrative office reviewing the radiation history -- I mean the Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history -- when I noticed the repeated pattern of high readings amongst the night staff."

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Nouns functioning as adjectives

Postby tomak » 2003-08-21, 3:42

You are quite right, I believe -- some of the nouns are functioning in an adjective style role -- the term grammarians like to use for this is "functioning attributively".

"dog pound"

dog is a noun, but, it is here used as an attributive noun, meaning that it describes an attribute of the pound -- a pound for dogs. Where I grew up, dog pound was a common phrase, in fact.

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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-21, 3:51

Yeah, but "reading" is not a noun at all, nor is "spending".
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Postby Junesun » 2003-08-21, 7:33

"Reading" and "spending" are gerunds, that are verbs used as nouns.
Examples of the usage of gerunds:

1) As the subject of a sentence: Swimming is great on a hot summer day.
2) As the object of a sentence: I went to a meeting.
3) As the complement after a preposition: I'm interested in meeting stars, but there's the difficulty in getting an interview.
4) In combination with an object: I enjoyed playing an instrument.
5) In combination with an adverb: I couldn't help laughing heartily.

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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-21, 20:52

Well, I must admit that I have no clue what the hell this, "Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history", means.
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So my example was way over the top... :)

Postby tomak » 2003-08-23, 2:26

> Well, I must admit that I have no clue what the hell this, "Washington University Hospital safety radiation badge reading history", means.

Ok, so I stretched it beyond the breaking point :)

Maybe I should have just stuck with "Washington University Hospital radiation badge" -- that is probably pretty legible ?

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Postby Sarabi » 2003-08-23, 16:14

LOL... Yeah, I understand that.
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