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Kat

English help

Postby Kat » 2003-09-20, 11:21

Hi I'm a new member, my name is Kat. I'm 16 and studying French among other things for my AS Levels at school in the UK.
Anyway I saw this topic and if anybody needs help with English then I'm here!! (English is my first language, French is my second but it's very basic!!)
Love, Kat xxxx

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-09-20, 16:04

Hurray, one more Brit to the group! :) Welcome to Unilang, Kat! :bounce:

Since we're in the English thread... Does anyone know which accent is that used by Quinn (Christian Bale) on "Reign of Fire"?
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Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-09-20, 16:08

Yep in that movie the accent he uses is a cockney accent, except his is really bad!! So there are people who sound a bit like that (mainly living in the poorer parts of London) but no quite like that. I really love his accent I think it is so sexy!! But unfortunately it doesn't really exist!!
Hope that helps....
Love Kat xxxx

Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-09-20, 16:09

Oh anyway I didn't notice that you were from Brazil!!
I really want to go there in my gap year, in two years time.
Is it as amazing as everyone says??
xxxx

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-09-20, 16:44

Kat wrote:Yep in that movie the accent he uses is a cockney accent, except his is really bad!! So there are people who sound a bit like that (mainly living in the poorer parts of London) but no quite like that. I really love his accent I think it is so sexy!! But unfortunately it doesn't really exist!!

Thanks a lot, Kat! I thought it might be Cockney, but since I've got no exposition to it at all (except for some slang words in a vocabulary list in one of my books), I couldn't tell. I once read that Christian Bale changes accents very easily for his roles and he can even use a different accent for each character he plays, so now, everytime I watch a film he's starring, I try to pay close attention to that. ;)

Kat wrote:Is it as amazing as everyone says??

Good question. :) Well, I confess I know very little of Brazil myself when it comes to travelling around and visiting places... My knowledge about many parts of it is purely theoretical, from books or from hearing what other people have to say about it. But being this large, Brazil has certainly a lot to offer for different tastes — from the jungle, the rivers and the Boi-Bumbá festival in the North to the food and the wonderful beaches in the Northeast, the historical towns, the 'hectic' life, the Carnival and the metropolises in the Southeast to the cosy, cool cities in the South... You can basically enjoy yourself as much as you want if you know what you like and know where to look for. ;) Ah, and don't believe everything you may read about violence, crimes and the like — they sure exist and they're certainly a problem, but, as far as I'm concerned, it happens in most (if not all) countries in the world and should never be the reason for someone to give up coming down and getting to know more about the country I love living in. ;)

Any details you might want to know, feel free to PM me, okay?
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comments by American English native

Postby tomak » 2003-09-26, 21:59

> You're welcome in Holland to speak Dutch.

To myself, that sounds like an odd rearrangement of (what I would expect):

In Holland you're welcome to speak Dutch.

That is, I parse it as "in Holland" being a prepositional phrase used adverbially.

I'm having trouble of thinking of any use of "welcome in" as a <xxx> <what do we call verb/prepositional combinations such as "welcome to" or "look up" ?>. The closest I can come is "Let us welcome in a new member", but that still sounds odd to my ears; I would rather expect "Let us welcome a new member", or "Let us welcome into our midst a new member". In the latter case, "into our midst" is clearly an adverbial phrase (a prepositional phrase used as an adverb), as is clear from the easy rearrangement, "Let us welcome a new member into our midst".



re: Cockney

How realistic was the Cockney that occurred in "Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels" (if you happened to see that) ?

re: English slang

Anyone know the etymology of "pants" for bad ?

Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-09-27, 7:20

Hmm about the cockney accents in Lock, Stock.... I haven't personally seen the film, but I do know that Vinnie Jones uses his own accent in the film so it must exist somewhere!! I would think they are real, most British films tend to be quite realistic but I would have to watch it to tell you for sure!! You would find those accents in the poorer parts of Greater London!!
And about the word 'pants' meaning bad, I have no idea but I can tell you that it is used a lot in England, although less now than a few years ago. Maybe it is cockney rhyming slang?? (Although I'm not a Cockney so I wouldn't know how it was formed!!)
Sorry that this isn't much help!
Love Kat xxxx

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Help with new course

Postby Junesun » 2003-10-15, 17:48

Hello,

I'm creating a basic English course for German speakers. For that reason, I'd like a native speaker to make some recordings to help with the difficult English pronunciation. For a more convincing rendition of the dialogues, I could even use several voices. Any volunteers?

Thanks,

Judith (Junesun)

Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-10-15, 18:03

I am a native English speaker from Herts (near London) and I would be happy to help you out, but I don't have a microphone, although if you need my help I could tape myself speaking and send it on to you through the post?? Let me know if you want me to do anything, I'm happy to help!! (By the way, the English I speak in Standard English, which could cause a problem if these people learn American English, coz they are very different both phonetically and grammatically.)
Love Kat xxxx

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Postby Steisi » 2003-10-15, 20:00

I can do some standard english recordings, although my accent differs only slightly from that of London, as I'm south of it.
but if you want my help i'm happy to give it :)

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Preposition?

Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-10-18, 4:24

A friend was writing a composition and had a doubt I totally blanked and couldn't solve for her... It was in a sentence similar to the following:

'Her father died in 1822. Her mother, however, got married [in] that same year.'

Should 'in' be included or not?

TIA!
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Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-10-18, 8:08

No the 'in' shouldn't be in that sentence!!
Love Kat xxxx

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Re: comments by American English native

Postby darkina » 2003-10-18, 19:17

tomak wrote:

re: English slang

Anyone know the etymology of "pants" for bad ?


I've seen 'that's pants' used as 'that's crap', to mean something stupid (example: a judgement on a tv show). I think it's just because 'pants' means underwear so it associates to...ehm low parts of a person ;) Am I stating the obvious? I probably am...
век живи, век учись, а дураком помрешь

Pleasures remain, so does the pain

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-10-23, 7:46

Guys, would you happen to know how common and in which places 'nephew' is pronounced /'nev.ju:/ (as opposed to /'nef.ju:/)?

Kat wrote:No the 'in' shouldn't be in that sentence!!

Thanks, Kat! :)
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Postby Patricia » 2003-10-23, 11:15

I think the first option looks more like how you'd write "nephew" in phonetics, but I pronounce it like the second option.

Kat

Postby Kat » 2003-10-23, 15:41

I have no idea but I asked my mother who said that people who say Nev-yu would most likely be people who are more common, and the posher people would say Neff-yu. But I don't know for sure....
Love Kat xxxx

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-10-23, 17:50

Just for the record, that question arose while I was reading Daniel Jones's An Outline of English Phonetics. In the chapter about The English Fricative Consonants, he writes:

691. v is the usual sound of v; example: voice vOIs, wave weIv. Ph is generally pronounced v in nephew 'nevju:, though some English people pronounce 'nefju:.

I had learnt that as /'nefju:/ myself, and I was surprised to find out /nevju:/ was possible — the difference is so 'small' I may've actually ignored the variation all my life after all. I even thought it might not be the case nowadays, since the 1st edition of the book dates back to 1918, but I looked it up in some dictionaries and some of them did indicate both possibilities. Even though I have to confess my English can get quite a mix of AE and BE at times, I try to stick as close to BE (and RP) as possible, so I couldn't help wondering whether that might be an important thing to 'change'. :)
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Kat

Nephew!!

Postby Kat » 2003-10-23, 18:48

I think if you want to be as close to British English as possible, then you should say 'nef-yu.' I have to say that I don't think many people say it the other way 'Nev-yu.' It is more 'English' to say the former. But there are of course lots of things that some English peope will say differently to others, for example Transport *trans-port (the 'a' sound from 'cat') or trarns-port(the harsh English 'a' sound, as in 'bath.')* And I have to say that most Brits find a foreign accent very charming - so I say keep it!!
Love Kat xxxx

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Postby ekalin » 2003-10-23, 21:19

Psi-Lord wrote:I couldn't help wondering whether that might be an important thing to 'change'. :)


Possibly if you really want to sound British. But as you said, the difference is so small that it is not likely that someone will notice.
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-10-24, 3:17

These last two years have been great to 'tune' my pronunciation — both teachers I've had are excelent in pointing many things that (curiously and unfortunately) many (most?) English courses around here doesn't seem to focus on.

Thanks for the help and the tips, guys. :)
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